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Understand and Embrace Women’s Media Habits and Channels

Understand and Embrace Women’s Media Habits and Channels
Learn how women engage with media, including social media, movies, TV shows, music, reading, and podcasts.

October 18, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

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Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Media Habits & Channels presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 Media Habits and Channels Study provides insights on the specific platforms Americans go to, their media habits, and their preferences for media content. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes. This report presents the data and insights through the gender lens.

Key Findings: Social Media

    • Social media serves as one of the keys to discovery and social connection. Women use online platforms to explore their personal interests and passions and stay in touch with their loved ones.
    • Women are slightly less concerned than men about the negative impact of social media on society. However, they are much more wary when it comes to personal priorities, like safety and privacy.

Context:

As women balance the positives and negatives of social media use, their Self-Caring Group Trait will likely guide them towards the types of interactions and platforms that justify their time, attention, and emotional investment.

Action Steps:

    • Be an empathetic, encouraging, and responsible owner of your social media channels. Content moderation and safety guidelines are paramount.
    • To amplify your brand’s presence in the noisy social media environment, sponsor or co-brand with popular social media content creators who appeal to women specifically.  As women seek inspiration and discovery online, your brand’s proximity can help boost lead generation.

Key Findings: Movies and Television

    • Women are not as enthusiastic about movies as they are about TV shows. Instead of watching a movie in a theater or even at home, many prefer binge-watching their favorite show.
    • There are notable genre preferences by gender. Across media, women enjoy comedy, drama, and suspense or thrillers more than men do. Meanwhile, action or adventure and sci-fi are more suited to men’s tastes in movies and TV.
    • Personal recommendations are the leading source of new content discovery for women. These viewers are also delighted to discuss movies and shows they watch with loved ones.

Context:

Women’s Self-Directed Group Trait helps explain why many women would rather string together a series of TV episodes instead of going to the movies. Watching at home offers greater control over content, timing, and personal safety. But this is not reclusive behavior. Socialization is embedded in the viewing experience: from discovery to post-watch lowdown sessions with friends.

Action Step:

    • Advertisers must collaborate with streaming TV providers to finetune technical ad execution to the streaming environment. The goal is a more seamless, subtle, and streaming-native ad experience.
    • Use the power of social listening and cultural trend insights to inform your brand’s creative strategy. Word of mouth and user-generated content related to popular movie and TV releases can be a powerful draw of women’s attention.

Key Findings: Music

    • For women, music is self-care. They often put on tunes to relax or lighten the load of their chores; they sing and dance along, which also helps lift their spirits.
    • Women are also less inclined to feel the pressure of developing or showing off their unique taste in music. Instead, they are more likely to go along with what’s currently popular.

Context:

Women lean into their Self-Care Group Trait by creating a safe and comfortable space in both physical and emotional places. In a fast-paced, news-cycle driven daily grind, busy women use music as a shortcut to respite.

While women’s relative disinterest in pursuing totally unique music interests is seemingly at odds with their Self-Directed Group Trait, it’s really a simple reminder that not every aspect of life demands the same investment of energy that’s required to assert one’s stance.

Action Step:

    • Be an extension of the listening experience, not a nuisance. Since desire to relax and recharge sets women’s listening experience apart, strive to match your tone, pace and the decibel level of the content that your ad or branded message may interrupt.
    • When designing your brand’s musical expression, lean into popular and trending tracks that have broad appeal. These will have a greater chance of resonating with women than more niche tunes will.

Key Findings: Reading

    • Despite the mainstreaming of digital and audio book formats, women still prefer the sensory experience of reading a print book. By extension, they’re also more likely to browse physical bookstores.
    • Women are drawn to fictional storylines, including novels, which lend themselves well to what women are looking for in a book: escape, relaxation, and entertainment.

Context:

Deep down, women’s attachment to physical print books is likely an expression of their desire for self-care. Book-in-hand, she can’t do chores or drive the carpool. A book provides the ultimate me-time, protected from external demands, expectations, or distractions. And preference for escapist, yet entertaining narratives is yet another manifestation of the Self-Caring Group Trait.

Action Steps:

    • Use brick-and-mortar bookstores and other retail locations as standalone media channels. Seize the opportunity to serendipitously get your brand’s message in front of consumers naturally primed for purchase.
    • Brands and products should aim to enhance women’s reading experiences and create a quiet retreat from the world.
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Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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The New Marketing Imperative: How Brands Win by Navigating Diverse America’s Evolving Priorities

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The New Marketing Imperative: How Brands Win by Navigating Diverse America’s Evolving Priorities

In 2022, increasing polarization on social issues revealed that America’s cultural divisions are likely here to stay. Further, it has become clear that conventional wisdom is no longer reliable, particularly in regard to where various segments stand on social matters. 

October 3, 2022
David Evans – Chief Insights Officer

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Collage Group’s Virtual Annual Member Roundtable is Thursday, Nov. 3 from 1 – 4 p.m. ET

National events are reshaping many of the priorities and perspectives of Americans in unexpected ways. The upshot is that brands may miss the mark if they assume embracing diverse segments requires aligning around a specific activist or political point of view.  

To navigate this minefield, it’s necessary to deeply understand where America’s diverse consumers stand on these issues and how they respond to brand activism. 

CMO Panelists

Francesco Lagutaine
Chief Marketing Officer

Michael Smith
Chief Marketing Officer

Gary Osifchin
Chief Marketing Officer & GM, US Hygiene

Here are some highlights from our agenda. Download the full agenda.

America Now 2022: Harnessing American Identity to Navigate Social Issues

Our Keystone presentation, America Now, will reveal Americans’ stances on major issues including race relations, abortion, climate change, LGBTQ+ rights, and challenges with personal finances and inflation. Throughout this presentation, we will go deeper than ever before, addressing if and how Americans want brands to respond to these social issues. 

The core of our research unveils how diverse consumer segments respond to the central ideas that have driven marketing for decades, such as the belief in the American Dream. In a time of radical cultural transformation, learn how brands can activate diverse segments with these core ideas in flux.

CultureRate Ad and Brand Performance: Engage Diverse Consumers with Lessons in Cultural Fluency

In this section of the Roundtable, you’ll access insights learned from our proprietary CultureRate database as we reveal new learnings into how your brand can differentiate and win across the diverse consumer spectrum.

Whether you are targeting across all consumer segments, working to resonate with multicultural consumers generally, or targeting a specific race or ethnicity, this research covers the bases on what works and why in ads–and provides examples from the brands that are winning in each case.

Our team calls out key lessons from winning brands and ads to guide you as you plan your marketing campaigns post- mid-term elections and into the new year.

CMO Panel: Succeeding Amidst America’s Cultural Divisions

Collage Group members have thought deeply about how to successfully navigate America’s cultural divisions that are likely here to stay. In this panel discussion with Chief Marketing Officers from America’s iconic brands, including M&T Bank, NPR and Reckitt, you’ll hear directly from them about the actions they are undertaking in marketing and insights strategy to successfully navigate the new social landscape.

Don’t miss this chance to learn how to navigate the challenge of connecting with diverse American consumers–across race, ethnicity, generation, sexual identity, and gender. Reserve your spot today!

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David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

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Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points
Learn how American Women engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Multicultural Women like cooking and baking the most

Women are less likely than Men to love cooking. Multicultural Women lean into cooking more than Non-Hispanic White Women and are the most into baking.

Context:

For Multicultural Women, cooking and baking are opportunities to connect with their heritage. It can be challenging to find baked goods they grew up eating, so baking them instead is a helpful option.

Action Step:

Provide examples of how your brand can help Multicultural Women connect with their cultural heritage through food.

Key Finding #2: Multicultural Women love to travel to connect with their heritage and be immersed in the culture

Multicultural Women are more likely to want to travel to places tied to their family’s heritage. When they do travel, they want to be immersed in the local culture through experiencing the food and living like a local.

Context:

Hispanic and Asian Americans are culture-focused and traveling to places that mean something to them culturally is one way they show their love of their culture. Asian Women are most likely to want to live like a local while traveling because of their inquisitive group trait, which shows up in their desire to learn about other places.

Action Step:

When showcasing travel as part of an overall marketing strategy, highlight what it means to travel like a local with cultural immersion at the center of the experience. Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.

Key Finding #3: Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise

Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise and will work out regardless of needing to do it to lose weight or be healthy. Walking is the most popular way to work out.

Context:

Multicultural Women’s love of fitness and exercise is part of a larger trend of being more health and fitness conscious. This shows up across category.

Action Step:

Showcase how your brand can help Multicultural Women reach their fitness goals. Walking is a very popular form of exercise, so highlight walking for its many benefits.

Key Finding #4: Women gamers prefer playing on their own

Women are more likely to play video games by themselves and on their mobile phones.

Context:

Women routinely experience bias and harassment online and that includes online gaming. As a result, many Women are choosing games that allow them to play alone and avoid toxic online interactions. Mobile games are often a more solo experience which may be way they lean into this channel for gaming more. However, Women are still active leaders in gaming and should be celebrated as such.

Action Step:

Showcase Women as leaders in the gaming industry and promote greater positivity for Women who enjoy gaming. It is also helpful to highlight solo games over more collaborative ones when engaging with Women in the gaming space.

Key Finding #5: Women are eco-conscious when it comes to fashion

Women, particularly those who are younger, love thrift shopping.

Context:

Women are conscientious shoppers. They care about the future of the world and thrift shopping is a sustainable, thoughtful, and economical way to shop.

Action Step:

Highlight your brand’s sustainable features and how your brand supports Women in being conscientious eco-friendly fashionistas.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Engaging Women Small Business Owners

Engaging Women Small Business Owners

Small businesses drive the American economy, and the number of women-owned small businesses is growing. Read on for more information about how to connect with women small business owners by understanding how they see themselves, their goals, challenges, and motivations for partnering with larger companies.

June 16, 2022
Jenny Wolski – Analyst

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Nearly all private businesses in the U.S. are small businesses and 1.2 million of those companies are women-owned. The number of women-owned small businesses is growing, and women small business owners are highly engaged in the day-to-day decisions about their business. As a result, women small business owners make up an important segment with whom marketers and larger businesses should engage and build partnerships. In our recent Small Business Owners Study we look at small business owner’s identity, future outlook, operations, and relationship with larger companies. Read below for highlights of the study related to women small business owners and contact us to receive insights for the full picture.

Key Insight #1

Women small business owners self-identify as purposeful individuals who think about their impact on the world and value community involvement. They possess a strong desire to have their business connect to other women in their community.

Women small business owners are determined to make a difference in their communities

Implication:

Women small business owners see themselves as perseverant, conscientious, and community-oriented, so focus in on those attributes in your communication with the segment.

Key Insight #2

Women small business owners are feeling less confident than men small business owners about the current health of their business. As a result of a more tepid business outlook, they are less likely to aim for expansion.

Women small business owners are less likely to report improvements in their business

Implication:

Recognize that women small business owners haven’t had the easiest year and focus communications on how your company may be able to lend a hand.

Key Insight #3

Women small business owners are hands-on leaders that play a significant— if not complete role— when making operational decisions including benefits, finance, technology, etc.

Implication:

Address marketing communication directly to women small business owners. Despite their busy and varied schedules, owners are usually at the heart of their company’s day-to-day decisions.

Key Insight #4

Women small business owners are looking for product innovation partnerships with large companies.

Implication:

Provide women small business owners with the tools and knowledge they need to innovate.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Jenny Wolski

Jenny Wolski
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Jenny is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2021 graduate from The George Washington University where she studied Statistics and Sociology. In her spare time, Jenny is often on a hike enjoying nature.

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How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres

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How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres
Mother’s Day is an important holiday for Americans of all backgrounds, but Multicultural segments—especially moms and dads versus non-parents—have nuanced attitudes and celebration styles. Read on for insights curated from our Holidays and Occasions research.

Mother’s Day is one of Americans’ most beloved holidays. It’s a day dedicated to Moms (and maternal figures), honoring their important role in the family. 85% of Americans celebrate it, with an especially strong emphasis from Hispanic Americans (91%). Mother’s Day has the fourth highest average per-person spending of any holiday or occasion according to the National Retail Federation. Mother’s Day occurs every second Sunday of May, which means this year (2022), it will be on May 8th.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

However, it’s important to note that while motherhood is celebrated all over the world, it doesn’t always occur on the same date as it does in the United States. For instance, some Latin American countries such as Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala celebrate Mother’s Day (El Día de las Madres) on May 10th every year. Many Hispanic-American consumers with heritage from these countries, especially Bicultural and Unacculturated, may prefer to uphold the tradition on the day from their country of origin instead of—or in addition to—the date Mother’s Day is celebrated in the United States. So, this is an important nuance not to be overlooked when activating on multicultural consumers. Plus, it offers an additional day to connect with your brand’s target consumer groups!

As your brand strategizes on how best to resonate with multicultural consumers, take note of the key similarities and differences in how each racial and ethnic segment (as well as differences among Parents and Non-Parents of each demographic) perceives of and celebrates Mother’s Day. Download the attached presentation and read on for key insights and takeaways.

Key Insight #1:

Hispanic Americans are highly involved on Mother’s Day, and this is true for both Parents and Non-Parents. They have higher celebration rates compared to other segments and are usually more likely to participate in celebration activities like hosting a barbecue/cookout, giving cards, and buying gifts.

A Deeper Look:

For Hispanic Americans, Mother’s Day is a family affair. Everyone comes together to honor the matriarch of the family. “It’s important to celebrate mothers because they are the building blocks of the family and they are the teachers,” says Maria Miranda, assistant director of the Arizona Latino Arts and Culture Center. Typical celebrations include extended family gatherings with plenty of food, music, and flowers.

Collage Group’s research on Family Connection underscores the importance of family relationships for Hispanic Americans. Mother’s Day is a natural extension of the segment’s love and appreciation for close family bonds and festive gatherings.

Action Step:

Acknowledge Hispanic Americans’ culturally-dual Mother’s Day celebrations, including the difference in celebration dates, through your marketing efforts. Incorporate the nuances that Hispanic Americans consider meaningful aspects of the holiday, such as large family gatherings with food and music.

Key Insight #2:

Black and Asian parents (both Moms and Dads) feel especially strongly about celebrating ALL the women in their life for Mother’s Day.

A Deeper Look:

Our research on Cultural Traits has showed us that these two segments are highly community-oriented, which likely explains their stronger association with Mother’s Day as a holiday honoring all women. Parents of these segments are particularly attuned to the role that other women in their communities play in raising their children, such as sisters, aunts, cousins, Godmothers, and friends.

For the Black segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the community’s history of adversity and the necessity to create a strong network of support for one another. It’s possible that as many Black Americans become parents themselves, they reflect even more strongly on the role that many women in their community had played in helping to raise them. 

For the Asian segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the segment’s cultural emphasis on respect and humility. Many Asian countries are more collectivist, meaning that social norms prioritize the community over the individual. This may help explain why Asian Parents would be more likely to want to recognize the contributions of all women on Mother’s Day. 

Action Step:

Create cross-cultural appeal by expanding your brand’s Mother’s Day marketing efforts to be inclusive of all women that play an important maternal or supporting role in the family. Connection with others is a theme that consumers across backgrounds resonate with universally. Be sure to infuse authentic cultural cues and segment-specific nuances to connect deeply both within segments, as well as across segments.

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Essentials of Women Consumers

Essentials of Women Consumers
Collage Group’s Essentials of Women Consumers presentation explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research for American Women: demographics and segment context, identity, and Group Traits.

March 21, 2022
Giana Damianos – Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

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Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural, and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all household purchasing decisions. But many advertisers are missing the mark in their portrayals of this powerful consumer segment. While gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman in recent years, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising.

Read on and fill out the form for more insights from our American Women research.

Representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about their identity. Brands today must evolve to effectively understand and engage the modern American woman.

Collage Group’s Essentials of Women Consumers explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research: demographicsidentity, and Group Traits to help your brand authentically connect with Women.

Key Insight #1:

Young women are especially likely to report their gender has become increasingly important over the past few years.

My gender has become increasingly important

A Deeper Look:

The greater focus on intersectional identities over the past few years has made it easier for younger people to embrace and recognize the importance of all aspects of their identity, including the important role gender plays, especially in the lives of women.

Action Step:

Bring a nuanced portrayal of women today to your marketing efforts – relatable specificity beats painting with too broad of a brush here.

Key Insight #2:

Women across age ranges are more likely than men to say that the only achievement they care about is being happy with what they do.

A Deeper Look:

Many Women have begun to reject #GirlBoss culture and the pressure to prove themselves as equally ambitious as men. Instead, they’re redefining what success means altogether – and doing it on the individual level.

Action Step: Let go of traditional, patriarchal definitions of success and instead, portray success on individualistic terms. Acknowledge that women have the power to choose the direction of their lives – and the choices are as unique as the individual.

Key Insight #3:

Women are particularly mindful about what they say and how it may affect others. They are much less likely than Men to speak their mind if it might hurt someone’s feelings.

I speak my mind even when it hurts feelings

A Deeper Look:

Women tend to have different emotional intelligence (EQ) strengths than men, such as higher levels of empathy, greater mindfulness in interpersonal relationships, and a stronger sense of social responsibility–all of which culminate in conscientiousness toward others.

Action Step: Portrayals of Women should highlight their soft skills as their superpower–and steer clear of portraying emotion and empathy as a pitfall or stereotypical trope.

Key Insight #4:

Women often feel uncomfortable putting their own needs first and feel a stronger obligation than Men to take care of others.

I do not feel comfortable putting my needs first

A Deeper Look:

Women’s discomfort with putting their own needs first before taking care of others is likely tied to longstanding social norms and gender roles. This feeling could also be tied to lack of self-confidence or self-worth. Women’s sense of obligation may also be out of necessity, since Women often face more pressures and stresses than Men.

Action Step: Give Women the space and permission to prioritize themselves and help alleviate the everyday pressures they face.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Giana Damianos
Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

Giana joined Collage in 2019 from Indiana University, where she studied economics, political science and psychology. In her spare time, Giana is getting to know Washington DC and its historic architecture.

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Insights for Engaging & Celebrating Women

Insights for Engaging & Celebrating Women
Collage Group Hosts A Conversation About Gender Equity with Pandora, TVOne, JAFRA and Diageo in Celebration of Women’s History Month Discussion.

Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all purchasing decisions. Gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman, however, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising.

Representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about their identity. Has your brand evolved to effectively understand and engage the modern American woman?

Read on and fill out the form to watch the replay and hear how brand leaders responded.

Collage Group had the pleasure of hosting four leaders from our member brands to explore insights and ideas for brands to support women and gender equality. Fill out the form to watch a replay of the presentation and panel discussion, and download an excerpt of the insights:

Collage Group Director of Product & Content Natalie Griffith kicked off the event with cultural intelligence on the demographic profile and cultural traits of women consumers, as well as insights from our Holidays & Occasions work specific to Women’s History Month.

Natalie’s presentation was followed by a conversation with Collage Group member panelists moderated by Zekeera Belton, Vice President of Client Services. Panelists included:

    • Nicole Buchanan, Pandora, National Sales and Strategy Lead, Multicultural Growth Segments
    • Audrey Cochran, TVOne, Vice President, Research
    • Andrea Hernandez, JAFRA, Sr. Brand Marketing Manager, U.S.
    • Tatiana Stadukhina, Diageo, Vice President, Johnnie Walker & Buchanan’s

Panelists answered key questions about their challenges and successes in authentically engaging and supporting women, including:

Q1: Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all purchasing decisions. How has your brand evolved to effectively understand and engage women consumers – and harness the power of their influence?

Q2: Gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman, however, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising. How has your brand worked to address this – and other challenges – to effective portrayals of American women?

Q3: The disruptions caused by the pandemic have disproportionately impacted women, specifically working moms, and could lead to long-lasting consequences for gender equality in the workplace. How is your brand supporting the modern American woman and taking steps to authentically support gender equality and drive progress?

Q4: How is your brand or company applying consumer insights on American women to support Diversity and Inclusion efforts, such as addressing the gender pay gap?

Q5: What do you think women – and the majority of Americans – are looking for from brands?

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Multicultural Women Expect Brands to Take Action towards Gender Equality

Multicultural Women Expect Brands to Take Action towards Gender Equality
This research is part of a series that expands on our 2021 Roundtable Presentation, America Now. Read on to learn more about American consumers today, their relationship to their gender identities, and what they expect from brands like yours.
 

Brands can better engage with consumers if they understand how they view identity. Race, ethnicity, age, sexuality, and gender are just some of the characteristics that people consider important to who they are. The different intersections of identity that people hold also impact how they think about themselves and the world around them. Women, and especially Multicultural women, consider their gender identity important and want to see brands support women in a variety of ways.

In a recent survey, Collage Group asked people to choose the most important aspect of their identity. Personality came out on top, followed by race, American nationality, and age. Just 5 percent of women responded that gender is the most important aspect of their identity. However, as Americans place increasing emphasis on all aspects of their identities, gender is no exception. Nearly half of women say that their gender has become an increasingly important part of their identity in recent years. Multicultural women are significantly more likely to agree with this statement, at 52 percent, compared to 39 percent of White women.

Multicultural Women and Gender Identity

As gender becomes a more important element in how women see themselves, brands must improve on current gender representation in advertising. Only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising, significantly less than the approximately 60 percent of men who agree.

Representation is especially important to multicultural women. Nearly two thirds of multicultural women say it matters to them either somewhat or a lot that advertisements portray people of the same gender identity as them. This is significantly more than the 40 percent of White women who say the same. Multicultural women also more often agree that they are more likely to patronize brands that use their advertising to challenge gender stereotypes.

But for many women, representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about their identity. About half of women want to see brands commit to equal pay for equal work and train their employees to recognize and confront sexism. Women also want to see brands hire more women in leaderships roles and make supportive statements and donations. Multicultural women demand a wide span of action from brands towards gender equality and are significantly more likely than White women to say they want brands to take all of these actions.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to diverse consumer insights in our cultural intelligence platform.

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How Women Want Brands to Get Involved in Women’s History Month

How Women Want Brands to Get Involved in Women’s History Month
How do women celebrate Women’s History Month? And what are their expectations from brands during the month of March? Read on for insights curated from our 2021 Holidays and Occasions research.
 

Women’s History has been celebrated in March nationwide since 1982, when the government designated the week of March 7th as Women’s History Week. The occasion expanded to Women’s History Month beginning in 1987.

Today, about four in ten Americans – women and men – celebrate Women’s History Month in some way. More than half of younger women ages 18-40 celebrate the occasion, as do more than 60 percent of multicultural women.

4 in 10 Americans celebrate Women's History Month

The most common way women mark Women’s History Month is to support women-owned businesses. Overall, about a quarter of all women do this, with multicultural women even more likely to do so. Education, both about women’s history and the challenges facing American women today, is also a common way many celebrate the month. It’s also important to note that multicultural women are significantly more likely to participate in all the methods of celebration we asked about than White women. The sole exception to that trend is donating money to relevant non-profits.

Multicultural women celebrate Women's History Month

In 2021, the food delivery app DoorDash celebrated Women’s History Month by leveraging women’s interest in supporting their peers’ businesses. They created a “Made by Women” section of the app to allow users to browse women-owned businesses all in one place. Plus, for each order from these restaurants that month, DoorDash donated $1 in support of women culinary entrepreneurs. This campaign allowed DoorDash to both support women-owned restaurants directly and provide support to the non-profit sector.

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America Now: Gen Z Women Key Issue – Sexism

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America Now: Gen Z Women Key Issue – Sexism

This research is part of a series that expands on our 2021 Roundtable Presentation, America Now. Read on to learn how Gen Z women stand out for their prioritization of reducing sexism.

2017 was a pivotal year for women in the U.S. The day after President Trump was inaugurated, millions of Americans across the U.S. participated in the largest single-day protest – The Women’s March – to support gender equality and protest the President’s anti-women statements. Later that year, the #MeToo movement gained momentum as more women broke their silence as survivors of sexual abuse and revealed the prevalence of sexual violence against women. With increased visibility on women’s issues, women have reported that their gender identity has become more important to them over the past few years. This is especially true of Gen Z women; 55% agree that their gender is now a more important aspect of their identity than it used to be. Brands can better engage with consumers by understanding how Americans’ identities shape their views on social and political issues, and what they expect from brands like yours in engaging with these issues.

In a recent study, Collage Group asked Americans what three social and political issues are most important to them and found that Gen Z women are unique in wanting to see the reduction of sexism in society. 33% of Gen Z women feel reducing sexism is one of the most important social or political issues today, compared to just 10% of Millennial women, 7% of Gen X women, and 3% of Boomer women.

Gen Z women’s perceptions on the importance of reducing sexism is even more pronounced when it comes to their support of brands. Over half of Gen Z women will reward brands that support reducing sexism. And while older women tend to prioritize other social and political issues over sexism, many are still more likely to support brands that will confront sexism.

Across generations, women want brands to address sexism by paying them equally to men for the same jobs and offering training for employees so they can identify sexism and combat it. Gen Z women, however, stand out from older women by wanting brands to address sexism in other ways too. Half of Gen Z women also want brands to hire women to leadership positions. And over one in four want brands to make public statements about sexism and donate money to organizations that work to reduce sexism.

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