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Collage Group Case Study | Cell

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Collage Group Case Study | Cell

INDUSTRY: TECHNOLOGY

GLOBAL CORPERATE REVENUE: $183 BILLION

Learn how the world’s leading brands are applying Collage Group’s cultural insights to drive authenticity in marketing that improves cultural resonance.

To demonstrate the company’s commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion, a global brand of consumer electronic devices planned an integrated brand campaign for Pride Month. As an organization, their objective was to engage multicultural audiences authentically and sustain conversation with diverse consumers. The electronic devices company aimed to shine a light on intersectionality of the communities they seek to engage throughout the year, specifically Black trans women. They saw an opportunity in Pride Month to show up as a brand to support the LGBTQ+ community, going deeper than they had in previous years. This was a key moment for the electronic devices company to elevate the stories and truths of underrepresented communities and carry optimism and advocacy forward throughout the year.

CHALLENGE

A global brand of electronic devices sought insight into how to activate LGBTQ+ consumers, with a specific focus on Black trans women. The Marketing Lead wanted to link category preferences to key segment insights to develop a creative brief for their ad agency for a Pride Month Campaign.

SOLUTION

Using Collage Group’s proprietary CultureRate:Ad data on advertising performance and the Cultural Traits of LGBTQ+ consumers, the company clarified the story line for the creative brief that grounded product features and category specific interests in an appreciation of Cultural Traits and was able to link these to the traits of LGBTQ+ allies. The Marketing Lead rethought the brief in a way that significantly expanded the audience without losing focus on LGBTQ+.  

Tying Objectives to Insights

Collage Group provided the insight and guidance needed to reposition the creative brief to significantly expand its appeal to a larger audience without losing focus on the target segment.

Category-level detail asked for by the client served as a useful, practical starting point for connecting with specific demographics.

OBJECTIVE

More deeply understand LGBTQ+ preferences for consumer electronic device usage.

COLLAGE RESOURCES, DATA & TOOLS

Category Essentials-Media specific to LGBTQ+ consumers provided a range of insights into streaming consumption, social media behavior, and device usage.   

Connecting the Dots

But to connect the dots, Collage’s deep dive into cultural insights allowed brand leaders to interpret the category-level detail into broader strategy and application of the insights.

OBJECTIVES

Immerse in LGBTQ+ cultural experience.

COLLAGE RESOURCES, DATA & TOOLS

Webinars and in-depth Q&A presentations on LGBTQ+ Cultural Traits revealed crucial Cultural Traits that could clarify the storyline particularly on the importance of a highly diverse friend group and low levels of “rootedness” or family ties.

Evaluate the cultural resonance of recent brand and recent ads with LGBTQ+ consumers.

Webinars on understanding Culturally Fluent ads provided essential guidance on casting, stories, and authentic representation.

 

Detailed CultureRate evaluations of recent alcoholic beverage ads leading with Black trans women and registering high Cultural Fluency were used to build confidence in the potential for allyship appeal.

Lean into LGBTQ+ Passion Points that reveal where the segment’s culture comes to life.

Webinars and Presentations on LGBTQ+ Passion Points revealed specific activities including music and fashion preferences that would inform creative decision making.

Putting Insights Into Action

Relying on these insights, and SME support from Collage Group’s in-culture subject matter experts, the Marketing Lead was able to develop a much more powerful creative brief.

Instead of relying solely on insights into the preferences of the (very small albeit visible) segment of Black trans women,  the Marketing Lead was able to reframe the campaign around the much more lucrative combination of this segment and its allies. The following actions were taken:

    • Oriented messaging around Cosmopolitan and Self-Expression, key traits of both LGBTQ+ and Black consumers.
    • Associated electronic device usage with the nuances of specific Passion Points appealing to LGBTQ+ people, including fashion and music.
    • Better positioned the product’s innovative camera features important to photography of diverse friend groups and community members.

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Multicultural Consumer Category Pulse Check: F&B, Alcoholic Beverages, Media, Telecom & QSR

Multicultural Consumer Category Pulse Check: F&B, Alcoholic Beverages, Media, Telecom & QSR
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The life of American consumers today seems to have only one constant – change. To keep up with these changes, we provide our members timely and relevant learnings they can use to fine-tune their multicultural consumer research and marketing strategies.

We offer these learnings at three levels:

1. Consumer demographics, cultural values, and passion points (Multicultural Essentials)

2. Consumer attitudes and behaviors within specific categories (Category Essentials)

3. Consumer perceptions of individual brands and advertisements (CultureRate:Brand and CultureRate:Ad)

Understanding this second level – how diverse consumer segments approach the industries relevant to you – is the focus of Collage Group’s Category Essentials reports.

These biannual reports provide a high-level view of the category-specific trade-offs and considerations facing today’s consumers.  They contextualize what you learn about America’s major consumer segments in the Multicultural Essentials by placing these segments within specific industries and categories. The reports’ category-specific coverage also provides insight that can help you better understand how your Brands and Ads are doing as revealed by your CultureRate:Brand and CultureRate:Ad reports. 

Through Collage’s consumer-level expertise and the input we receive from members on issues of high priority, we develop the insights you need to understand key similarities and differences across multicultural segments. Equipped with these insights, you will be able to better navigate topics of interest and importance for your category and target consumers.  We plan on revising all Category Essentials decks twice every year.

Collage Group members can exclusively access full webinar replays and more in-depth Category Essentials materials for the following categories:

Food & Beverage

QSR

Alcoholic Beverages

Media

Telecom

To learn more about our multicultural consumer category research, fill out the form below.

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Brands: Media, Telecom, and Sports Leagues

Cultural Fluency Product Spotlight: Apple Music
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Our recent CultureRate:Brand study tested the cultural resonance of 47 media and telecom brands and sports leagues.

One of our key findings from this study is that many media brands fail to resonate with multiple cultural segments. This is likely due to the highly saturated media space (there are 1,000s of channels to choose from) and the fact that many channels are targeted to specific segments and don’t aim for total market appeal. Nevertheless, there were a few brands that did resonate widely like the streaming music service Apple Music. This brand did very well across Multicultural segments.

Why does Apple Music perform so well with Multicultural consumers?

One reason Apple music performs so well with multicultural consumers is because of high brand trust. When you look at the different components broken down on the chart below, you’ll notice that all segments rank Apple Music around or above average on trust. This makes sense: Apple is a well-regarded brand with huge name recognition and is known as a pioneer in the digital music industry. When Apple launched the Apple Music service in 2015, they already had a reputation for quality music products from iPod and iTunes – Apple Music was the next logical product. And it looks like they’ve been able to maintain and extend their users’ trust with this high-quality music service.

To view the full report, please fill out the form below.

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How Great Brands Confront Racism and Injustice: Panel Discussion With Leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel & Walt Disney Company

How Great Brands Confront Racism and Injustice: Panel Discussion With Leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel & Walt Disney Company
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Augmented by early findings from our research into racism in America, our virtual panel discussion with leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel and Walt Disney Company provided powerful new insights into the actions brands need to take now. Replay the entire discussion below.
 

The week of Juneteenth 2020, Collage Group was honored to host a virtual panel discussion with Daneyni Sanguinetti from Coca-Cola, Natasha Aarons from Google Pixel and Brian Walker from Walt Disney Company on the topic of how great brands are confronting racism and injustice. Our sessions was scheduled on short notice after public outrage in the wake of the killings of black individuals and the video footage of white privilege at its worst in Central Park.  We have witnessed an extraordinarily generative moment prompting citizens of all backgrounds across the country to protest for social justice, an end to police violence, and to initiate real meaningful steps toward reducing institutional racism.

As part of our session, we shared early findings from our just-fielded survey of over 2361 consumers on racism and social justice in America.  Full results of this initiative will be published in several weeks, but we provided an excerpt to set discussion with our invited guests.  Wound that the vast majority are feeling “sad,” “frustrated,” and “angry” in response to the recent events, but we also found that 20% of consumers felt “hopeful.”  Indeed, similar positive emotions are significantly stronger among the multicultural community, with Black consumers in particular feeling “motivated” and “empowered” to a degree unmatched by other consumers.

We also asked consumers to report on how big a problem racism is on a scale of 1 to 10  where 1 equates to “not a problem at all” and 10 to “a very serious problem.”  No surprise that the Black community overindexes in response to this questions with 85% scoring it in the range between 8-10, but even a solid majority of White consumers report scores in this range.  Indeed more individuals across every single intersection of race, ethnicity and generation responded with a 10, than with any other score.

The good news is that brands taking a stand are most likely to gain. We asked consumers how they would respond to brands making statements “supporting causes and organizations I care about”, and to brands “donating money to causes and organizations I care about.” The answer: the highest percentage of consumers report they are “more likely to purchase products,” with an around one in ten reporting they would react negatively.

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Tales of Telecom: See What Multicultural Consumers Really Want from Providers

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In 2017, cell phones, internet, and watch-anywhere TV have become appendages of consumers’ bodies. We’ve conducted several studies about digital behaviors and attitudes, but our latest work goes deep into how consumers make the critical decisions around which telecommunications products to buy, and what features are important to them. The research uncovers a broad array of insights, with explorations into the telecom landscape, deep-dives into cell phone, TV and internet providers, and path-to-purchase.

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