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The Next Frontier: Older Gen Alpha and Younger Gen Z

The Next Frontier: Older Gen Alpha and Younger Gen Z
Are you effectively engaging the youngest – and most diverse – consumer segments in America?

September 23, 2022
Natalie Griffith – Director, Product & Content

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If not, then you’re not only missing out on forging a connection that will pay dividends for years to come, you also may be missing out on connecting with their parents, who control a sizeable portion of spending today. Keep reading to learn more about how Collage Group can help you better connect with older Gen Z, younger Gen Alpha, and their (mostly) Gen X and Millennial parents.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
The Next Frontier: Older Gen Alpha and Younger Gen Z presentation.

There are currently more than 62 million American parents living with children under 18. These individuals constitute an outsized opportunity for brands as they’re making spending decisions for both themselves and their kids. As kids in America reach majority minority status, it’s becoming harder to know how to authentically connect with kids (and parents) of different cultural backgrounds.

To fully capture the attention of parents and kids today, organizations must learn to speak to and connect with this newest generation of families.

Collage Group’s Parents & Kids Program offers organizations the insights they need to fully understand today’s modern families and how they differ across race, ethnicity, and generation on important issues and topics, at both the consumer and category level. The fifth presentation in the Parents and Kids program, attached here as a webinar replay and PowerPoint, provides primary research on kids 6-12, as well as their parents. This research will ensure organizations appreciate the full picture of the modern American family.

Key Insight #1:Gen Alpha and Gen Z are the most racially and ethnically diverse cohorts of Americans to date. Gen Alpha is the first majority-minority generation, with only 48% of the cohort identifying as non-Hispanic White.

Context:

The increase in interracial and interethnic marriages over the past 50 years, steady immigration, and higher birthrates among multicultural women have led to an increasingly diverse population of younger Americans. In turn, the youth is coming of age surrounded by and expecting greater diversity in all aspects of life.

Action Steps:

    • Reflect America’s growing diversity in your advertising.
    • Start working now to win and build relationships with your future consumers by understanding how to best connect with culturally diverse Americans.

Key Insight #2: For kids today, standing out is the new fitting in. And differentiators have shifted too – kids view their mindsets as more differentiating than traditional markers like looks or skin color.

Context:

Kids today have grown up with diversity as the norm, so differences based on skin color or ethnicity do not stand out as strongly for them as they did for previous generations of kids. Instead, differentiators like mindset and interests are more prominent.

Action Steps:

    • Celebrate diversity along multiple facets – from interests to ethnicity

Key Insight #3: Today’s kids, especially girls, are eagerly pushing the boundaries and even rejecting the very premise of gendered play. This pushback goes well beyond the superficial elements such as packaging and shelf placement: Kids today firmly believe that toys are created for all.

Context:

The fact that young girls today are rejecting gender-based stereotypes in play is a logical extension of the decades’ long conversation around gendered roles and expectations. An incremental, yet powerful shift in higher education and in the workplace is erasing the lines between traditionally “gendered” careers. In popular culture, strong female-lead characters are defying the stereotype of a dainty damsel in distress. And many parents today deliberately choose to avoid such stereotyping. This shift  is both lauded by the voices promoting gender equality and derided by more conservative critics. 

Action Steps:

    • Manufacturers and retailers should watch this space closely. As kids increasingly perceive toys as gender-neutral and play with any toy they choose, brands that lean in can get first-mover advantage, especially if they can do so without getting political. But this privilege may come with a burden of some backlash, at least initially. To appeal to a broader customer base, consider offering several product line varieties or designing store layouts in a way that accommodates both mindsets.

Key Insight #4: Digital media, including on-demand streaming services, multiplayer video games, and social media platforms, dominate kids’ time and attention today. While parents continue to monitor and supervise their children’s online activity, Older Gen Alpha and Younger Gen Z are expertly and confidently navigating the digital world.

Context:

The unprecedented pace and breadth of tech innovation has allowed these digital natives to gain agency, serve their personal and collective interests (from hobbies to social causes), and amplify their voices. Peer-to-peer collaboration and connection, exposure to always-on surveillance and tracking, and a need to balance and reconcile the images they project online and in real life (IRL) will mark Gen Z and Gen Alpha segments’ relationship with people and technology for the foreseeable future.

Action Steps:

    • Meet these young consumers where they are. Where appropriate, use your digital platforms to amplify their voices.
    • Create consistent and coherent experiences across channels — both online and IRL.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Parents and Kids Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Natalie Griffith
Director, Product & Content

Natalie has over 10 years of experience in consumer insights and brand strategy, including 3+ years as lead researcher in Gartner Iconoculture’s Gen Z practice. Natalie has managed research projects across industries, including extensive work in financial services, media, technology, and food and beverage. Natalie holds a B.S. in Psychology from Tulane University.

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New Diverse Consumer Insights for Q4 2022

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New Diverse Consumer Insights for Q4 2022

More than 250 of America’s top brands have access to the deep cultural insights needed to engage America’s diverse consumers. Do you?

September 20, 2022
David Evans – Chief Insights Officer

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Here’s an overview of the new reports we’re releasing in Q4 2022 and beyond that you’re missing out on.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these
diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

2022 Virtual Members-Only Roundtable

In 2022, increasing polarization around social issues has revealed that America’s cultural divisions are likely here to stay. But it has also become clear that the conventional wisdom regarding where various segments stand on social issues is no longer fully accurate. National events are reshaping many of the priorities and perspectives of Americans in unexpected ways. The upshot is that brands may miss the mark if they assume embracing diverse segments requires aligning around a specific activist or political point of view.

To navigate this minefield, brands need a clear understanding of where Americans across diverse segments stand on these issues and how they respond to brand activism. Collage Group’s 2022 Virtual Members-Only Roundtable, featuring updates to our America Now and CultureRate research, will help brands and organizations navigate the challenge of connecting during this period of uncertainty and confusion. Attendees will walk away with insights and tools to make data-driven decisions that will maximize connection.

Category Essentials

Our category-specific research evaluates consumer attitudes and behaviors across specific consumer goods industries. New proprietary deliverables, which include deeper category insights identified by member request, will be made available for each of our four memberships throughout the fall.

Media Habits & Channels

Learn how to connect with diverse consumers by engaging them through media. This quarter we will explore Americans’ behaviors and attitudes related to various entertainment and social media (visual, social, audio). Our research centers on both traditional media and content, as well as new channel preferences.

CultureRate

Through insights gleaned from our CultureRate database, we will unveil lessons learned from top performers across diverse segments. CultureRate provides a one-stop solution for our members’ mounting need for a comprehensive, ongoing analysis of the cultural fluency of their brands. Cultural fluency is crucial to future growth as American consumers become more responsive to multicultural themes, representation, and stories. In our all-new Q4 research, learn how CultureRate continues to be an asset for companies, many which are leveraging the largest database of its kind available and growing annually by over 200,000 responses or 30 million unique datapoints.

Parents & Kids

Create a lifetime of brand loyalty by tapping into the evolving needs of parents and their children. With rapidly changing demographics, families are becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. Discover how your brand can leverage these insights to better engage parents and kids.

Health & Wellness

Health affects every community in America, and is a key area of interest for consumers, especially as we approach a post-pandemic America. Learn more in this exploration of diverse consumer health and wellness attitudes and behaviors, covering payers, providers, and industry insights.

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Other Recent Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

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5 Key Findings on American Parents

5 Key Findings on American Parents

Learn how American parents differ from their non-parent peers with respect to key cultural values such as community-seeking, optimism, and being culture-focused. The presentation uses both a gender and race/ethnicity lens to unearth in-depth insights about both moms and dads.

August 1, 2022
Bryan Miller – Director, Syndicated and Solutions

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America’s leading brands know that a key strategy for maintaining and growing market share is to connect with parents. The reasoning behind this is twofold. First, it allows brands to capture mind and wallet share of individuals (parents) that are often making decisions for multiple people at once (themselves and their kids). Second, it allows brands to begin building a relationship with kids through their parents–the payoff here is the kids’ loyalty in the future.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Activate American Parents Through Culture:2  presentation.

Collage group’s newest research within the Parents & Kids program provides insights brands can use to execute on this family-focused strategy. We provide data-driven insights and action steps brands can use to deepen their connection with American parents and the children they are raising.  This current study reveals how American parents differ from their non-parent peers with respect to key cultural values such as community-seeking, optimism, and being culture-focused. The presentation uses both a gender and race/ethnicity lens to unearth in-depth insights about both moms and dads.

Below are 3 key findings and action steps from this study you can use to drive better connection with these key decision-makers. 

    1. Parents are inherently optimistic about the future, including achieving success. Recognize parents’ optimism by leaning on themes that speak to bright days ahead, while being careful not to discount current worries and hardships. Appeal to parents’ desire to achieve their goals, particularly in the context of having a family and multiple obligations, by showing how your products will help them find the time to do everything they need—and want—to do.
    2. Parents, especially multicultural parents, prioritize cultural heritage and stewardship. Celebrate the importance of cultural heritage and passing on traditions in families, while reminding consumers how your products can support this.
    3. Dads are more likely than men without kids to open up about their emotions. Highlight dads’ emotional, less reserved, and caring side in your marketing efforts. Recognize and validate in communications that dads also go through changes once they have children, which are often not as visible.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Parents & Kids Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Bryan Miller

Bryan Miller
Director, Syndicated and Solutions

As Director of Content, Bryan leads the content team that produces all of Collage Group’s syndicated research and oversees the AdRate and BrandRate ratings products. Bryan holds a Master of Arts from Georgia State University’s Philosophy and Brains & Behavior Program, a Master of Science in Applied Economics from the University of North Dakota, and a Doctor of Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University in the Philosophy of Science, the Philosophy of Psychology and Bioethics. Outside of work, Bryan is a passionate film buff and lover of great food.

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Parents & Kids: Category Essentials

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Activate Parents & Kids Within Categories
Part of understanding parents and kids is appreciating how decisions are made in specific categories. Explore usage, drivers, and channels for specific categories that are top of mind for parents and kids, as well as additional insights brands need to fully understand parents and how they differ across diverse segments.

May 20, 2022
Natalie Griffith – Director, Product & Content

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Collage Group’s Parents and Kids Category research explores dynamics of parents and kids by ethnicity within key categories: food, beverage and QSR, personal care and beauty, infant care, media, toys and games, and travel.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our 
Activate Parents & Kids Within Categories presentation.

Part of understanding parents and kids is appreciating how and who makes decisions in specific categories. It’s also crucial to understand how parenting styles vary based on key characteristics such as race, ethnicity, generation, and gender. In this presentation, we explore usage, drivers, and channels for specific categories that are top of mind for parents and kids, including:
    • Food, beverage and QSR
    • Personal care and beauty
    • Infant care
    • Media
    • Toys and games
    • Travel

Key Finding #1: Consider the multiple factors impacting parenting style and values

Parents today are overwhelmed with information and influence – from competing information sources, to competing  parenting styles, it can be hard to make decisions in any category.

Many Factors Impact Parenting Style and Values, but Generation and Race and Ethnicity Have an Oversized Impact

    • Race and Ethnicity transmit and proxy for religious and country of origin elements that impact parenting style and values
    • Generation transmits the powerful social norms the parent grew up in

Action Step:

 Understand the specific factors that drive purchases in your category, as well as how they differ by ethnic segment.

Key Finding #2: Mealtime is an opportunity for familial and cultural connection

Mealtime is an important connection point for families, especially for multicultural parents who seek to introduce their culture to their children through native cuisine.

Multicultural Parents, Especially Hispanic and Asian American Parents, Want Their Children to Enjoy Cultural Foods

% of parents that think it’s very or extremely important their children eat food from their family’s cultural background

Hispanic
53%
Black
46%
Asian
59%
White
30%

Action Step:

Message not just around the importance of mealtime, but around the cultural connection it enables. Also consider providing parents with accessible ways to introduce native foods to their children.

​Key Finding #3: Today’s parents give let kids share in family decision making

From mealtime and personal care to travel, parents today are involving their kids in decision making processes, big and small.

Most Parents Have Handed off Decision Making about Personal Care Products by the Time Their Kids Become Teenagers

I let my teenager(s) choose their own personal care products like shampoo, soap, lotion, etc.

Hispanic
71%
Black
68%
Asian
73%
White
76%

Travel Decisions Are a Collaborative Process Between Kids and Parents – Older Parents Who Are More Likely to Have Older Kids Over-Index Seeking Their Children’s Input

How much influence does your child(ren) have on where you go for family vacations? 

Hispanic Black Asian White
A lot - I plan vacations on where my child(ren) says they want to go
28%
27%
22%
24%
Some - I provide my child(ren) with options for where we can go and get their input
56%
56%
63%
58%
None - I plan where we go for vacations without my child(ren)'s input
15%
17%
16%
18%

Action Step:

Recognize that there are two key decision makers when messaging to the families of today, and make sure you are communicating benefits that appeal to both parents and kids.

Key Finding #4: Use media to enable cultural connections 

Media is an important cultural connector for families today. Asian and Hispanic parents seek out shows and movies in their native language, and Black parents feel it is important for their kids to see characters that look like them.

Across Multicultural Segments, Parents Are Making an Effort to Ensure Their Children See Themselves in the Characters They Watch

I make an effort to have my child(ren) watch shows that have main characters that are: 

Black Hispanic Asian White
Black
41%

77% ▲

36% ▼

46%
Hispanic

63% ▲

36%
34%
43%
Asian
35%
33%

61% ▲

42%

Almost Half of Hispanic and a Third of Asian American Parents Think It’s Important Their Children Watch Shows and Movies in Their Family’s Language

0 %
of Hispanic parents say it's important that their children watch shows and movies in Spanish
0 %
of Asian parents say it's important that their children watch shows and movies in their family's native language

Action Step:

Provide representation in ways that are culturally specific, and enable the learning experiences parents hope to provide – whether that is through language or representation.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Parents Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Natalie Griffith
Director, Product & Content

Natalie has over 10 years of experience in consumer insights and brand strategy, including 3+ years as lead researcher in Gartner Iconoculture’s Gen Z practice. Natalie has managed research projects across industries, including extensive work in financial services, media, technology, and food and beverage. Natalie holds a B.S. in Psychology from Tulane University.

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There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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Connect with America’s Diverse Parents

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Connect with America’s Diverse Parents
Are you effectively engaging the 62 million parents currently living in the US with kids under 18? To win in a rapidly diversifying America, it’s crucial to understand these individuals and how they’re raising their children. Keeping reading to learn more about how Collage Group can help you better connect with parents and kids in America.

April 28, 2022
Bryan Miller – Director, Syndicated and Solutions

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There are currently more than 62 million American parents living with children under 18. These individuals constitute an outsized opportunity for brands as they’re making spending decisions for both themselves and their kids. To fully capture parental attention, organizations must understand and address these individuals as parents. But as America continues to diversify, it’s becoming harder to know how to authentically connect with parents of different cultural backgrounds.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Parents and Kids : Connect with America’s Diverse Parents presentation.

Collage Group’s Parents & Kids Program offers organizations the insights they need to fully understand parents and how they differ across race, ethnicity, and generation on important issues and topics, at both the consumer and category level. The program also provides primary research on young kids to ensure organizations appreciate the full picture of the current American family. The program’s inaugural webinar series consists of 5 presentations, listed below.

The first presentation is attached here as both a downloadable pdf document and a webinar replay. It offers brands three recommendations to better connect with parents, as well as a warehouse of insights to help brands activate on the recommendations.  The recommendations are:

    1. Speak to the stresses and challenges many parents face
    2. Position your brand as a tool to help parents move their kids closer to their goals
    3. Help parents educate their kids around core culture and identity issues

Several key findings and next steps from this presentation include:

    1. Younger parents, especially Gen Z, are less likely to think that having kids should completely change their lives. Embrace younger parents’ desire to have it all by acknowledging this sentiment and how it shapes their reality.
    2. Multicultural parents place a higher emphasis on their children achieving financial success. Position the desire for their kids’ financial success within the context of persevering through challenges, children realizing the fruits of their parents’ labors, and having the means to take care of loved ones.
    3. Moms are more likely than dads to teach or plan to teach their kids about other identities, including other races, other cultural groups, LGBTQ+ identities, and differently abled people. Prioritize communicating with moms when offering tools to parents that want to teach their kids about these identities.
    4. Around two-thirds of Hispanic and Asian American parents are raising their kids to be bicultural—i.e., actively and fully embracing both being American and of another culture. Consider light-lift social media activations around culturally-specific holidays to drive resonance within the segment, and educate those outside of it.
    5. Almost half of all parents—and 3 in 5 black parents—believe that girls will have a harder time achieving success because of their gender. Acknowledge the gender-related challenges many moms have faced in their own lives, while clarify the steps you’re currently taking to reduce sexism.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Parents Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Bryan Miller

Bryan Miller
Director, Syndicated and Solutions

As Director of Content, Bryan leads the content team that produces all of Collage Group’s syndicated research and oversees the AdRate and BrandRate ratings products. Bryan holds a Master of Arts from Georgia State University’s Philosophy and Brains & Behavior Program, a Master of Science in Applied Economics from the University of North Dakota, and a Doctor of Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University in the Philosophy of Science, the Philosophy of Psychology and Bioethics. Outside of work, Bryan is a passionate film buff and lover of great food.

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How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres

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How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres
Mother’s Day is an important holiday for Americans of all backgrounds, but Multicultural segments—especially moms and dads versus non-parents—have nuanced attitudes and celebration styles. Read on for insights curated from our Holidays and Occasions research.

Mother’s Day is one of Americans’ most beloved holidays. It’s a day dedicated to Moms (and maternal figures), honoring their important role in the family. 85% of Americans celebrate it, with an especially strong emphasis from Hispanic Americans (91%). Mother’s Day has the fourth highest average per-person spending of any holiday or occasion according to the National Retail Federation. Mother’s Day occurs every second Sunday of May, which means this year (2022), it will be on May 8th.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

However, it’s important to note that while motherhood is celebrated all over the world, it doesn’t always occur on the same date as it does in the United States. For instance, some Latin American countries such as Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala celebrate Mother’s Day (El Día de las Madres) on May 10th every year. Many Hispanic-American consumers with heritage from these countries, especially Bicultural and Unacculturated, may prefer to uphold the tradition on the day from their country of origin instead of—or in addition to—the date Mother’s Day is celebrated in the United States. So, this is an important nuance not to be overlooked when activating on multicultural consumers. Plus, it offers an additional day to connect with your brand’s target consumer groups!

As your brand strategizes on how best to resonate with multicultural consumers, take note of the key similarities and differences in how each racial and ethnic segment (as well as differences among Parents and Non-Parents of each demographic) perceives of and celebrates Mother’s Day. Download the attached presentation and read on for key insights and takeaways.

Key Insight #1:

Hispanic Americans are highly involved on Mother’s Day, and this is true for both Parents and Non-Parents. They have higher celebration rates compared to other segments and are usually more likely to participate in celebration activities like hosting a barbecue/cookout, giving cards, and buying gifts.

A Deeper Look:

For Hispanic Americans, Mother’s Day is a family affair. Everyone comes together to honor the matriarch of the family. “It’s important to celebrate mothers because they are the building blocks of the family and they are the teachers,” says Maria Miranda, assistant director of the Arizona Latino Arts and Culture Center. Typical celebrations include extended family gatherings with plenty of food, music, and flowers.

Collage Group’s research on Family Connection underscores the importance of family relationships for Hispanic Americans. Mother’s Day is a natural extension of the segment’s love and appreciation for close family bonds and festive gatherings.

Action Step:

Acknowledge Hispanic Americans’ culturally-dual Mother’s Day celebrations, including the difference in celebration dates, through your marketing efforts. Incorporate the nuances that Hispanic Americans consider meaningful aspects of the holiday, such as large family gatherings with food and music.

Key Insight #2:

Black and Asian parents (both Moms and Dads) feel especially strongly about celebrating ALL the women in their life for Mother’s Day.

A Deeper Look:

Our research on Cultural Traits has showed us that these two segments are highly community-oriented, which likely explains their stronger association with Mother’s Day as a holiday honoring all women. Parents of these segments are particularly attuned to the role that other women in their communities play in raising their children, such as sisters, aunts, cousins, Godmothers, and friends.

For the Black segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the community’s history of adversity and the necessity to create a strong network of support for one another. It’s possible that as many Black Americans become parents themselves, they reflect even more strongly on the role that many women in their community had played in helping to raise them. 

For the Asian segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the segment’s cultural emphasis on respect and humility. Many Asian countries are more collectivist, meaning that social norms prioritize the community over the individual. This may help explain why Asian Parents would be more likely to want to recognize the contributions of all women on Mother’s Day. 

Action Step:

Create cross-cultural appeal by expanding your brand’s Mother’s Day marketing efforts to be inclusive of all women that play an important maternal or supporting role in the family. Connection with others is a theme that consumers across backgrounds resonate with universally. Be sure to infuse authentic cultural cues and segment-specific nuances to connect deeply both within segments, as well as across segments.

Contact us via the form below to learn more about how you can access deeper insights on our cultural intelligence platform.

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Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity

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Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity
Collage Group Launches Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program

American consumer attitudes continue to evolve, and to help you keep pace, Collage Group is incredibly excited to announce our new Parents & Kids Program as part of our leading Cultural Intelligence Platform. This new offering, created with input from nearly a dozen Collage members, is designed to cover the insights marketing and consumer insights professionals need to engage and activate parents and kids across race and ethnicity. Based on our scoping, there is no other syndicated resource available that offers full coverage of parents and kids with race and ethnicity overlays.

Fill out the form below for more details on the new program, including reporting breakouts and content.

Why focus on Parents & Kids?

Demographic change amplifies the need to effectively resonate with America’s diverse parents and their children. In fact, the generations most likely to have children are between 5 and 12 percent more racially and ethnically diverse than older generations.

And, multicultural Americans are 10% more likely to have children under 18 living in their households.

Household with Children Under 18 Present Average Household Size
40% Hispanic
3.4 Hispanic
34% Asian
3.0 Asian
27% Black
2.6 Black
23% White
2.4 White

For many brands, the age of kids is also especially important given the development of decision-making processes–our research will dig deeper into this area. From birth to age 3 children are largely dependent on parental decision-making. As children age, they develop more capacity to make their own decisions.

What’s included in the Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program?

Starting this spring, our new Parents & Kids Program will unveil how culture impacts the roles that moms and dads play in their children’s lives, with insights including:

    • the parenting style(s) they embrace
    • the values they prioritize instilling in their kids
    • how they navigate the impact of the changing media landscape and shifting social norms on their children

The Program also provides insight into how the culture, age and gender of the child impacts parental attitudes and behaviors, including:

    • how they respond to their children’s preferences and desires
    • how they select products and services for their kids across category
    • when and how they “hand-off” decision-making to their kids across category

Collage Group is committed to conducting specific research on both parents and kids to provide unparalleled insights, as many brands have a significant gap in their understanding of the way culture impacts parenting and the parent-child decision-making process. We hope you’ll find value in this new research.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Multicultural Consumer Media Consumption

Multicultural Consumer Media Consumption

Optimize your brand’s connection with consumers across multicultural segments by understanding where they consume media content, and why they go where they do. Keep reading for key insights on social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming, with downloadable deck and webinar replay.

Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

    • Are they following specific topics?
    • Are they following influencers?
    • Are they looking for products to purchase?
    • Are they just killing time?
    • Is it device dependent?
    • Does it depend on the race, ethnicity, sexuality, gender of the characters or hosts?

Collage Group’s 2021 Media Study answers these questions by providing granular insights across multicultural segments. Our research reveals the specific platforms American media users go to, and what they’re using them for. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes.

Fill out the form below to access the Media Consumption in Diverse America ranked as part of our CultureRate research.

Media Consumption in Diverse America

Social Media

Key Insight: Across age cohorts, multicultural segments are more likely to engage in consumer journey behaviors on social media.

Not only are multicultural Americans more likely to use social media in the first place, they’re also more likely to be power-users, engaging with brands and products alongside friends and family. These relative differences are most pronounced for the 41+ Hispanic segment, where they uniquely over-index in finding new products, communicating directly with brands, finding coupons, and participating in competitions on social media.

Video Media

Key Insight: Black and Hispanic Americans are most likely to add subscriptions for specific content

Over half of Hispanic Americans, and about a third of Black and Asian Americans, listen to podcasts or radio shows in a non-English language. And for Hispanic and Asian consumers, the primary resource they use is social media, on platforms like YouTube and Twitch. Hispanic Americans also over-index on AM/FM radio, Spotify, and Pandora for non-English audio content.

Audio Media

Key Insight: For non-English radio shows and podcasts, social media and AM/FM radio are multicultural consumers’ go-to sources. 

Over half of Hispanic Americans, and about a third of Black and Asian Americans, listen to podcasts or radio shows in a non-English language. And for Hispanic and Asian consumers, the primary resource they use is social media, on platforms like YouTube and Twitch. Hispanic Americans also over-index on AM/FM radio, Spotify, and Pandora for non-English audio content.

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Fill out the form below to access the Top 20 Brands and Ads ranked as part of our CultureRate research.

How Consumers Across Generations Celebrate Mother’s Day

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How Consumers Across Generations Celebrate Mother's Day

Learn how American consumers prepare for and celebrate Mother's Day.

Mother’s Day presents ample opportunity for brands to connect authentically with consumers across generations. Collage Group’s Holidays & Occasions research provides insights on a wide scope of important events that occur throughout the year. In addition to Mother’s Day, members get access to research on holidays such as Thanksgiving, Hispanic Heritage Month, Halloween, Christmas, plus several more. Fill out the form below to view a sample from this year’s Mother’s Day study on Gen Z, Millennials, Gen X and Boomers. 

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This past Mother’s Day, Pandora launched a thoughtful campaign aimed towards younger generations that features Netflix sensation and Stranger Things actor, Millie Bobbie Brown. 

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Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology

Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology

Cultural Fluency, or the ability to use culture to connect effectively and authentically within and across consumer segments, is an emerging priority for brands. Understanding and embracing multicultural terminology is a key component of the cultural fluency journey.

Applying Multicultural Terminology

Brands Are Challenged by Rising Cultural Diversity and Polarization.

Research and insights leaders face enormous pressure to translate the rapid cultural transformation underway in the U.S. marketplace into clear action steps for their brands.

In 2020, cultural change rapidly accelerated, given the sudden shifts in consumer values and behaviors driven by COVID-19 and the heightened recognition of the social justice movement. CMOs began 2021 with the demand that their insights and marketing teams adopt new and more inclusive approaches to engaging America’s diverse population. “Cultural Fluency” has emerged as a new mandate: the ability to use culture to connect effectively and authentically within and across segments.

Getting language and labels right is a key component of authentically engaging across America’s diverse consumer segments. Our research-centered insights unveil consumer reaction to terms like Latinx and BIPOC, the nuances of Hispanic vs. Latino and Black vs. African American, and the most preferred terminology for Asian Americans.

Learn What Factors Influence Multicultural Terminology Preferences

The challenges insights professionals face with respect to multicultural terminology are growing as American consumers, fueled by recent social events, embrace their racial, ethnic, and intersectional identities.

This presentation explores how personal characteristics such as race, ethnicity, country of origin, generation, and gender influence self-identification and preferences for specific labels. Insights and marketing professionals can use these findings to craft outreach and messaging that respects consumer preferences and signals empathy and understanding.

Additionally, many insights professionals fail to recognize and account for the diversity within the Hispanic population that is especially important when it comes to terminology and preferred labels. This presentation also provides an overview of Collage Group’s proprietary Hispanic Acculturation model and a breakdown of preferred identifiers by acculturation level. These findings can be leveraged to improve engagement among specific Hispanic segments, including those that are Spanish-dominant.

Further, researchers unfamiliar with multicultural America often struggle to identify the correct terminology to use in surveys and may accidentally bias their results in ways they fail to appreciate. This research helps insights professionals understand the nuances of multicultural terminology, including the positive or negative sentiment in-culture consumers associate with specific terms. These findings can be used by insights professionals to craft more effective surveys.

Top Lessons for More Inclusive Research

Leveraging data from over 6,000 respondents across three surveys fielded in 2020, this presentation explores how multicultural Americans approach the many options available to them for personal self-identification. While the language surrounding multicultural identity has evolved over the past years in public discourse, multicultural Americans themselves are mostly neutral or negative about the proliferation of many new options others use on their behalf. When engaging multicultural research participants, insights professionals should be mindful to present options aligning with how these individuals prefer to think of themselves.

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