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Slow Improvement Amid Cultural Uncertainty: Updated Economic Forecast and Survey Results on Consumer Finances and Purchasing

Slow Improvement Amid Cultural Uncertainty: Updated Economic Forecast and Survey Results on Consumer Finances and Purchasing
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Given all the uncertainty and stress of COVID, it’s more important than ever for marketers to keep a finger on the pulse of important consumer attitudes and behaviors.

To support this need, we at Collage have been conducting an intermittent tracking survey of how 18 to 39-year-old Americans, a group we call the New Wave, are responding to this extraordinary time.  In our most recent update, we compare the trailing average of four pulse surveys through mid- September to the trailing average through late August.  Read further for excerpts from our full report available exclusively to members.

Consumers Remain Generally Hesitant to Engage in Social Activities But Trending Slightly Positive.

One key indicator for increasing economic activity is how comfortable people feel engaging in the social activities which drive personal consumption and job creation. The story here is that of little meaningful change: consumer hesitancy to participate in these activities is clear across the board. We’re over six months into a worsening pandemic and unsurprisingly we see that most consumers just aren’t comfortable getting back to life “as it was.” The only substantial difference across multicultural segments is that non-Hispanic white consumers tend to be more comfortable engaging in these social activities, while unacculturated Hispanics tend to be less comfortable overall.

Purchase of Home Care and Personal Care Products May Be Trending Positive.

Despite the greater concern with finances and slightly reduced comfort with public places overall, New Wave consumers report they plan to spend more in a few areas, notably home care, personal care, and beauty. We see some small movements in other categories as well, including food, home care, and beverages, but the real story is lingering overall hesitancy to increase spending on non-essentials.  The increased spread of COVID-19 as we head into the cooler months may be driving the expected increase in home care spending.  As the downloadable presentation shows, personal care and beauty vary considerably by demographic.

Fill out the form below to to learn how your brand can stay ahead of the curve on critical consumer trends.

Fill out the form below to to learn how your brand can stay ahead of the curve on critical consumer trends.

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Nonalcoholic Beverages: Jarritos

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Nonalcoholic Beverages: Jarritos
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In this CultureRate:Brand study for non-alcoholic beverage brands, we had the opportunity to test Mexican soda brand, Jarritos, with multicultural consumers.

You might expect Jarritos to do well with Hispanic New Wave consumers – and you’d be right – but you might be surprised to know that the brand achieved a cultural reach score of 2, being culturally resonant with the Asian New Wave segment as well.

You may be wondering why Jarritos performed so well with these two groups. On the slide below, you see the percent of each segment that agrees with each of the six components of our Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ). We see trends both across segment lines (columns) and across specific components (rows).

When you look at the different components, you’ll notice that pretty much across the board, Hispanic Acculturation segments score Jarritos very highly. Asian consumers share much of this sentiment, but aren’t as fanatic when it comes to perceiving Jarritos as a brand which shares their values. So there’s still room to improve, but Asian consumers – who are often adventurous and seek out authentic options for food and drink – clearly have strong affinity for this Hispanic heritage brand.

For Black and white New Wave consumers, though, Jarritos falls behind. With one exception – the Black segment sees Jarritos as a brand they can advocate for, potentially for its cultural significance, even if it’s not one they relate to personally. This sentiment is something Jarritos can leverage in future campaigns seeking to broaden its consumer base.

Collage Group members get access to a free, detailed report on one ad and one brand per year. Members may also obtain more reports on ads at an additional cost. Fill out the form below to learn more about the benefits of membership, cultural fluency, brand testing and more.

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How Great Brands Confront Racism and Injustice: Panel Discussion With Leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel & Walt Disney Company

How Great Brands Confront Racism and Injustice: Panel Discussion With Leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel & Walt Disney Company
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Augmented by early findings from our research into racism in America, our virtual panel discussion with leaders from Coca-Cola, Google Pixel and Walt Disney Company provided powerful new insights into the actions brands need to take now. Replay the entire discussion below.
 

The week of Juneteenth 2020, Collage Group was honored to host a virtual panel discussion with Daneyni Sanguinetti from Coca-Cola, Natasha Aarons from Google Pixel and Brian Walker from Walt Disney Company on the topic of how great brands are confronting racism and injustice. Our sessions was scheduled on short notice after public outrage in the wake of the killings of black individuals and the video footage of white privilege at its worst in Central Park.  We have witnessed an extraordinarily generative moment prompting citizens of all backgrounds across the country to protest for social justice, an end to police violence, and to initiate real meaningful steps toward reducing institutional racism.

As part of our session, we shared early findings from our just-fielded survey of over 2361 consumers on racism and social justice in America.  Full results of this initiative will be published in several weeks, but we provided an excerpt to set discussion with our invited guests.  Wound that the vast majority are feeling “sad,” “frustrated,” and “angry” in response to the recent events, but we also found that 20% of consumers felt “hopeful.”  Indeed, similar positive emotions are significantly stronger among the multicultural community, with Black consumers in particular feeling “motivated” and “empowered” to a degree unmatched by other consumers.

We also asked consumers to report on how big a problem racism is on a scale of 1 to 10  where 1 equates to “not a problem at all” and 10 to “a very serious problem.”  No surprise that the Black community overindexes in response to this questions with 85% scoring it in the range between 8-10, but even a solid majority of White consumers report scores in this range.  Indeed more individuals across every single intersection of race, ethnicity and generation responded with a 10, than with any other score.

The good news is that brands taking a stand are most likely to gain. We asked consumers how they would respond to brands making statements “supporting causes and organizations I care about”, and to brands “donating money to causes and organizations I care about.” The answer: the highest percentage of consumers report they are “more likely to purchase products,” with an around one in ten reporting they would react negatively.

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Is That Organic? How Millennial Food & Beverage Choices are Quickly Changing

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Consumers of all ages have begun to pay more attention to their health and wellness. So how can brands position themselves around these trends? Our food and beverage deep dive takes a look at how gen-Z and millennials’ conception of health and wellness influences their behaviors.

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Convenience Stores: A $140 Billion Opportunity

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Multicultural consumers are changing the retail landscape and the way brands approach shopper marketing. Convenience store marketing, however, is often neglected and poorly understood, especially across multicultural segments. But why? According to Nielsen, convenience-store sales represent 17% of total retail sales, and reached $140 billion in 2016, up from $126 billion in 2012. This trend, combined with the rising purchasing power of multicultural consumers, reveals a big need for multicultural insights within the convenience-store channel.

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The Millennial Path to Purchase: Food & Beverages

Continuing with our millennial shopper series (access Youth & Sports Part I & Part II) our latest installment takes on the path to purchase for food & non-alcoholic beverages. Understand the journey of the millennial shopper – from catalyst to loyalty.

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Changing Tastes: Non-Alcoholic Beverages

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Whether you’re five or ninety-five, you probably drink at least one non-alcoholic beverage per day. Despite this, the non-alcoholic beverage industry has seen a steady decline over the past few years. Is this driven by more interest in healthy foods, a change in tastes, or something else? Our latest total market study was designed to learn more about consumers’ beverage preferences and uncover the drivers behind the trends.

Multicultural Consumers are More Loyal

Hispanic and African-American consumers typically stick with their favorite brands when shopping for non-alcoholic beverages. They’re less likely to be swayed by a sale or coupon. On average, 27% of consumers say that  they purchased a non-alcoholic beverage because of a sale.

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