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Understand and Embrace Generational Consumer Media Habits and Channels

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Understand and Embrace Generational Consumer Media Habits and Channels
Learn how Americans across generations engage with media, including social media, movies, TV shows, music, reading, and podcasts.

November 28, 2022
Giana Damianos – Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Generational Consumer Media Habits & Channels presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 Media Habits and Channels Study provides insights across generations on the specific platforms American media users go to, their media habits, and their preferences for media content. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes.

Key Findings: Social Media

    • All Generations, with the exception of Boomers, use a wide variety of platforms, and they tend to be always ‘on’.
    • This high social media use comes at a cost, Gen Z worries most about the impact on their mental and emotional wellbeing and becoming addicted. All generations have concerns for their privacy and safety.
    • Social media functions as a portal to other media, especially for younger generations.
Primary concerns about use of social media

Context:

Social media is both friend and foe for consumers today. It is a powerful enabler of connection across generations – on the younger end, it provides ways to find community and make new friends, and on the older end it’s a powerful way to reconnect.

But there are downsides too – younger generations feel the pressure of constant comparison that social media forces upon them, and consumers of all generations worry about safety and security.

 Action Steps:

    • Provide ways to mediate the mental and emotional effects of being online.
    • Facilitate meaningful connection by encouraging authentic self-expression.
    • Utilize the power of social media as a discovery engine for other types of media – like new music and shows to watch.

Key Findings: TV & Movies

    • Most generations watch TV shows via online streaming platforms, but for Boomers, watching live TV is still most common.
    • Generations also vary when it comes to what they watch – younger generations show a preference for comedy, whereas older generations show a preference for tv news and action/adventure movies.

Context:

The proliferation of mobile devices has driven demand for streaming platform subscriptions among younger consumers. The accessibility of smart phones, tablets, and laptops offers younger generations the opportunity to stream content on the go.

Further, younger generations’ changing tastes align better with what streaming platforms offer, compared to Boomers who still highly favor news and sports, which are better suited to live TV.

 Action Steps:

    • Find and attract different generations of TV and movie viewers by understanding, and activating, based on where and when they are viewing:
      • Maintain advertising presence across TV formats, but understand that while Boomers may be watching TV more, their viewing is more passive.
      • Meanwhile younger generations are watching more via streaming platforms, but may have shorter attention spans for ads

Key Findings: Music

    • Music is a top passion point for younger consumers. The majority of Gen Z and Millennials would rather listen to music than watch TV.
    • Music is popular across generations for its ability to provide comfort and diversion while multitasking.
      Across Generations, consumers embrace the human element of music – and enjoy creating playlists themselves and sharing musical tastes with others.
47% of Americans would rather listen to music than watch TV

Context:

Music is a powerful comfort – and a powerful connector – across generations, but this is particularly true for Gen Z, a generation that craves human connection and relief from stress and anxiety.

Younger generations are passionate music fans overall, but while Gen Z tends to consume music more passively, their Millennial counterparts are more active in their passions – and like to go out to shows or live music venues.

 Action Steps:

    • Embrace the human element when selecting and promoting music – from showcasing artists stories to background on lyrics
    • Lean into options for music to be both passive and active, depending on consumer needs. For example, create task specific playlists to help consumers as they multitask, or interactive playlists for when music is the main focus.

Key Findings: Reading & Audiobooks

    • Most Americans enjoy reading – but we see significant variation by generation when it comes to format. Millennials are much more likely to consume audiobooks, and are also the most likely generation to embrace digital books.
    • Reasons for reading also vary significantly by generation. Gen Z reads as an escape, whereas older generations read to relax and to learn.
List of reasons why one reads for pleasure

Context:

Life stage and generational values play a big role when it comes to each generations reading style, as well as reasons for reading.

Millennials are often on the go, which is reflected in their penchant for consuming audiobooks as well as digital books that don’t require lugging around their reading material of choice.

The high stress and high pressure that Gen Z faces on a day-to-day basis are reflected in their desire to read as an escape, whereas Boomers entering retirement and looking for new passions are more likely to use reading to learn and to explore new topics.

 Action Steps:

    • Reach on-the-go Millennial readers through on-the-go media – audiobooks and e-readers.
    • Show an understanding of why readers are reading – for Gen Z and Millennials, this means giving them an escape, whereas for older readers, this might mean showing knowledge or skills gained through reading.

Key Findings: Podcasts

    • Podcasts are particularly popular with Millennials, many of whom listen while commuting or otherwise on the go.
    • Consumers across generations are drawn to podcasts for different reasons – Boomers are most likely to say they want to learn something or lean into a passion, whereas Gen Zers look for laughs and stories.

Context:

Millennials have become synonymous with “hustle culture” – and it’s this desire to always be learning, doing, or leveling up, paired with a particularly busy life stage, that contributes to their affinity for podcasting.

Boomers, on the other hand, are entering retirement and many are looking for continuous education opportunities, or simply to learn more about new passions, which we see reflected in the types of podcasts they listen to.

 Action Steps:

    • When developing podcast marketing, consider the context and outcomes your target audience hopes to gain from listening in.
    • For example, orient Millennial targeted ads around added value or information.
    • But if targeting Boomers, focus on teaching about products tied to hobbies or other interests.

Other Digital & Media Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Giana Damianos
Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

Giana joined Collage in 2019 from Indiana University, where she studied economics, political science and psychology. In her spare time, Giana is getting to know Washington DC and its historic architecture.

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Metaverse, TikTok, AR – Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media

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Metaverse, TikTok, AR – Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media
Learn how Americans across races, ethnicities, and generations engage with emerging technology and media, including the metaverse, AR, VR, emerging social media platforms, and influencers.

November 21, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives, and today’s media landscape is always changing. Technologies like the metaverse, augmented reality, and virtual reality, along with emerging trends in social media like influencer marketing, have the potential to change people’s everyday lives. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand how people feel about these new technologies, their current usage rates, and if they are interested in using them in the future.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 study on emerging media provides insights across races, ethnicities, and generations on Americans’ behaviors around the metaverse, AR, VR, wearable smart devices, and NFTs. It also looks at newer and emerging social media platforms like TikTok and BeReal, and the power of influencer marketing.

Key Findings: The Metaverse

    • Millennials, alongside Hispanic and Black Americans are more likely to have tried the metaverse and to believe it is for people like them.
    • 1 in 2 Americans want to learn more about the metaverse and they want brands to play a role in that education. This desire is particularly strong for Black Americans.
    • Entertainment is the most popular reason Americans are interested in the metaverse today. This is particularly true for Black and Hispanic Americans.

Context:

Millennial and Multicultural Americans, particularly Hispanic Americans, are keen to try new technologies as soon as they come out. For Millennials, they have grown up in an era of new tech adoption and now have relatively more resources to buy in to the new tech. Multicultural Americans often turn to technology to explore the world and their own culture, as well as the culture of others.

Many Americans expect brands to be more than just the products and services they offer. Black Americans especially want brands to step up on a host of issues. The lack of clarity still surrounding the metaverse makes it an important opportunity for brands to play a guiding role.

Entertainment holds the key to consumers’ current use (video games, digital concerts, experiences, etc.) and future appeal. Since the metaverse is still in an experimental development phase, entertainment is the most compelling reason for consumers to give the tech a try.

 Action Steps:

    • Develop your metaverse marketing strategy with early adopters – Millennial and multicultural consumers- in mind.
    • During this early phase of the metaverse, take steps to educate consumers about this emerging technology. This can include specific information on what is and isn’t considered the metaverse, the promise the technology holds, and what consumers can expect from your brand on the metaverse.
    • When connecting with Americans on the metaverse, prioritize entertainment experiences. Sponsoring a concert or sports game on the metaverse will be a way to tap into the many Americans who want to use the platform for these experiences.

Key Findings: AR, VR, and Wearable Devices

    • Americans are still not using AR or VR technology at high rates, although many are likely using AR without knowing it.
    • Asian and Hispanic Americans are most likely to use wearable devices. Health and fitness is the leading reason to use these devices, particularly for Asian Americans.

Context:

Many Americans may be unaware that they have used AR in their everyday life because they don’t relate the experience they had with the label of AR. As a result, the concept of “augmented reality” doesn’t have as much traction with consumers as the specific uses and platforms do.

Multicultural Americans, particularly Hispanic and Asian, have a strong passion for fitness. They are more likely to enjoy working out and a wearable device such as an Apple Watch or Fitbit allows them to stay connected to their fitness goals. But, while many Americans use their wearable for fitness, they are also glancing at their wearable throughout the day.

 Action Steps:

    • Don’t get caught up in labeling the technology your brand offers. Many are enjoying the experience they are getting from this technology, even if they don’t use the terminology.
    • Make marketing “glanceable” so that emails and newsfeeds can work in the small screen of the wearable as well.

Key Findings: Social Media and Influencers

    • Short content is the star of social media platforms, and that is especially true for TikTok. Americans lean into short videos whether they are on TikTok for just a few minutes or way longer.
    • While most Americans think that marketing coming directly from brands is more trustworthy than an influencer, they also find influencers and content creators to be trustworthy sources of information.

Context:

TikTok is known for its “snackable” content, and the desire for Americans to see shorter videos aligns with why this platform became so popular to begin with. Shorter content gives viewers control over how much they watch. Even if they end up watching many videos, it still feels more manageable than committing to one, longer piece of content.

Consumers are savvy about influencer marketing, and partnerships with influencers who are transparent and trustworthy will feel more authentic to them. People don’t expect an absence of advertising on social media, but they do prefer it to be clearly identified as such.

 Action Steps:

    • When advertising on TikTok, keep it “snackable” and deliver videos less than one minute in length.
    • When partnering with a content creator on social media, select those that are authentic and trustworthy including offering transparency and honesty in their decisions and potentially going out of their way to combat misinformation.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Winter Holidays: Key Insights and What Brands Need To Know

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Winter Holidays: Key Insights and What Brands Need To Know
Learn how American consumers across racial and ethnic segments prepare for and celebrate the winter holiday season.

October 24, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

Holidays and occasions are focal points for many Americans. These events afford people the opportunity to express their cultural traditions and individual preferences through decorations, food and beverage, entertainment, and activities.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Multicultural Holidays & Occasions presentation.

Holidays and occasions are also important for brands and organizations as they present an opportunity to deepen connection with consumer segments. Day of the Dead, Thanksgiving, Christmas and Kwanzaa are some of the key winter holidays brands need to understand to fully capture diverse America’s attention. Collage Group helps marketers and insights leaders connect around this holiday by providing insights that clarify the similarities and differences in how American consumers across diverse segments prepare for and celebrate these holidays. These insights allow for more efficient and effective activations that capture greater mind and market share.

Key Insight #1:

Half of Hispanic Americans celebrate Día de los Muertos, and Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic Americans are most comfortable with brands activating on this holiday.

Key Insight #2:

Most Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, and most Multicultural consumers incorporate non-traditional foods into their Thanksgiving celebrations.

Key Insight #3:

 Hispanic and Asian American segments are more likely to say their Christmas celebrations go beyond “typical” American traditions.

Key Insight #4:

Kwanzaa is a popular holiday, celebrated by many Black Americans.

Key Insight #5:

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are popular for Black and Asian Americans as a kick-off to holiday shopping.

What can my brand do to activate on a winter holiday?

    • Focus on authenticity, particularly if you are activating on a holiday that is celebrated by a specific racial or ethnic segment like Dia de los Muertos and Kwanzaa. Depending on your brand, this can include a simple celebratory message on social media pages, helping to educate the broader community about the holiday, or partnering with in-segment content creators to tell their own personal stories related to the holiday.
    • Highlight what is non-traditional about traditional American holidays. Thanksgiving and Christmas are celebrated across racial and ethnic segments, but many Multicultural Americans have their own traditions based on their heritage and upbringing. Showing the range of how Americans celebrate will appeal to many Americans, particularly those who are Multicultural, and who have different ways of celebrating.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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Understand and Embrace Women’s Media Habits and Channels

Understand and Embrace Women’s Media Habits and Channels
Learn how women engage with media, including social media, movies, TV shows, music, reading, and podcasts.

October 18, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

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Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Media Habits & Channels presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 Media Habits and Channels Study provides insights on the specific platforms Americans go to, their media habits, and their preferences for media content. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes. This report presents the data and insights through the gender lens.

Key Findings: Social Media

    • Social media serves as one of the keys to discovery and social connection. Women use online platforms to explore their personal interests and passions and stay in touch with their loved ones.
    • Women are slightly less concerned than men about the negative impact of social media on society. However, they are much more wary when it comes to personal priorities, like safety and privacy.

Context:

As women balance the positives and negatives of social media use, their Self-Caring Group Trait will likely guide them towards the types of interactions and platforms that justify their time, attention, and emotional investment.

Action Steps:

    • Be an empathetic, encouraging, and responsible owner of your social media channels. Content moderation and safety guidelines are paramount.
    • To amplify your brand’s presence in the noisy social media environment, sponsor or co-brand with popular social media content creators who appeal to women specifically.  As women seek inspiration and discovery online, your brand’s proximity can help boost lead generation.

Key Findings: Movies and Television

    • Women are not as enthusiastic about movies as they are about TV shows. Instead of watching a movie in a theater or even at home, many prefer binge-watching their favorite show.
    • There are notable genre preferences by gender. Across media, women enjoy comedy, drama, and suspense or thrillers more than men do. Meanwhile, action or adventure and sci-fi are more suited to men’s tastes in movies and TV.
    • Personal recommendations are the leading source of new content discovery for women. These viewers are also delighted to discuss movies and shows they watch with loved ones.

Context:

Women’s Self-Directed Group Trait helps explain why many women would rather string together a series of TV episodes instead of going to the movies. Watching at home offers greater control over content, timing, and personal safety. But this is not reclusive behavior. Socialization is embedded in the viewing experience: from discovery to post-watch lowdown sessions with friends.

Action Step:

    • Advertisers must collaborate with streaming TV providers to finetune technical ad execution to the streaming environment. The goal is a more seamless, subtle, and streaming-native ad experience.
    • Use the power of social listening and cultural trend insights to inform your brand’s creative strategy. Word of mouth and user-generated content related to popular movie and TV releases can be a powerful draw of women’s attention.

Key Findings: Music

    • For women, music is self-care. They often put on tunes to relax or lighten the load of their chores; they sing and dance along, which also helps lift their spirits.
    • Women are also less inclined to feel the pressure of developing or showing off their unique taste in music. Instead, they are more likely to go along with what’s currently popular.

Context:

Women lean into their Self-Care Group Trait by creating a safe and comfortable space in both physical and emotional places. In a fast-paced, news-cycle driven daily grind, busy women use music as a shortcut to respite.

While women’s relative disinterest in pursuing totally unique music interests is seemingly at odds with their Self-Directed Group Trait, it’s really a simple reminder that not every aspect of life demands the same investment of energy that’s required to assert one’s stance.

Action Step:

    • Be an extension of the listening experience, not a nuisance. Since desire to relax and recharge sets women’s listening experience apart, strive to match your tone, pace and the decibel level of the content that your ad or branded message may interrupt.
    • When designing your brand’s musical expression, lean into popular and trending tracks that have broad appeal. These will have a greater chance of resonating with women than more niche tunes will.

Key Findings: Reading

    • Despite the mainstreaming of digital and audio book formats, women still prefer the sensory experience of reading a print book. By extension, they’re also more likely to browse physical bookstores.
    • Women are drawn to fictional storylines, including novels, which lend themselves well to what women are looking for in a book: escape, relaxation, and entertainment.

Context:

Deep down, women’s attachment to physical print books is likely an expression of their desire for self-care. Book-in-hand, she can’t do chores or drive the carpool. A book provides the ultimate me-time, protected from external demands, expectations, or distractions. And preference for escapist, yet entertaining narratives is yet another manifestation of the Self-Caring Group Trait.

Action Steps:

    • Use brick-and-mortar bookstores and other retail locations as standalone media channels. Seize the opportunity to serendipitously get your brand’s message in front of consumers naturally primed for purchase.
    • Brands and products should aim to enhance women’s reading experiences and create a quiet retreat from the world.
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Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumers’ Media Habits and Channels

Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Media Habits and Channels
Learn how LGBTQ+ American consumers engage with Media, including social media, movies, TV shows, music, reading, and podcasts.

October 17, 2022
Alonzo Bailey – Data Analyst

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Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
LGBTQ+ Consumer Media Habits & Channels presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 Media Habits and Channels Study provides insights on the specific platforms LGBTQ+ Americans go to, their media habits, and their preferences for media content. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes.

Key Findings: Social Media

    • LGBTQ+ consumers are social media power users. For them, social media is one of the keys to discovery, self-expression, and community.
    • Their active social media use comes at a cost: LGBTQ+ social media users worry about the physical and emotional safety risks and the spread of anti-LGBTQ+ discourse on this digital channel.
    • Still, social media serves as connective tissue for their personal interests and passions: They seek inspiration, discover new media and entertainment content, and connect with other people who have similar interests and life experiences.

Context:

LGBTQ+ consumers are, on average, younger than non-LGBTQ+ Americans, which partially explains the segment’s heightened engagement with social media. This segment’s Proud and Communal Group Traits offer another clue about their appreciation of this channel. Online, they can be themselves, proudly present their identity, and find, and band with like-minded users.

As more seasoned social media users, LGBTQ+ consumers are more likely to have experienced both the ups and downs of social media firsthand.

Action Steps:

    • To reach and engage with LGBTQ+ and younger audiences, build your brand social media presence on more “niche” platforms and look for opportunities for influencer collaborations.
    • Facilitate authentic peer-to-peer and consumer-to-brand interaction on your social media channels. Prioritize inclusive design to better engage with this audience.
    • Be an empathetic, encouraging, and responsible owner of your social media channels. Content moderation and safety guidelines are paramount.

Key Findings: Movies and Television

    • Streaming TV is LGBTQ+ viewers’ preferred way to watch television. Over-the-top streaming services offer on-demand access to the content they might not find elsewhere.
    • On-screen and behind-the-camera representation is extremely important to consumers in this segment. They seek authentic stories about people who share their life experiences, and they champion creatives from other underrepresented groups (e.g. women, people of color).
    • This segment is more likely to appreciate video content for its entertainment value. Genres like animation, horror, and reality TV offer LGBTQ+ viewers a temporary escape from reality. They also value movies and TV shows that drive interactions with others — online and off.

Context:

LGBTQ+ viewers are drawn to streaming both by virtue of their digital nativity and thanks to the relative abundance of LGBTQ+-focused content released to or exclusively produced by streaming companies.

Movies and TV help partially fulfill their desire for social connection — both online and in real life — and their need to retreat from an antagonistic sociopolitical environment.

Action Step:

    • Prioritize streaming in your media budget.
    • Use this segment’s unique genre preferences to produce more resonant creative content.
    • Tap into social media groups and fandom to keep pace with what’s trending for this consumer group.

Key Findings: Music

    • LGBTQ+ consumers are music super fans. From soundtracking mundane daily tasks to spontaneous dance parties or organized music events and festivals — LGBTQ+ listeners are there for it all.
    • Streaming audio services and social media are the key sources of music discovery for LGBTQ+ consumers.

Context:

Social media, including YouTube and audio streaming services, provide easy (and often free) access to a vast variety of music to today’s consumers. LGBTQ+ listeners, who are generally younger than other Americans, are especially well-positioned to take advantage of everything that the musical world has to offer.

Action Step:

    • To better connect with LGBTQ+ consumers through music, find the synergy between their favorite music and video content genres and extend the reach through social media.

Key Findings: Reading

    • Reading may not be Americans’ favorite pastime, but more than a third of LGBTQ+ consumers read at least a few times a week. They are also more likely than their non-LGBTQ+ peers to listen to audiobooks.
    • LGBTQ+ readers pick up a book in search of relaxation, escape from reality, or a chance to use their imagination.

Context:

LGBTQ+ consumers are partial to digital, on-demand content delivery systems, and this preference extends to books and other reading materials. But that doesn’t render print obsolete. Independently owned bookstores that serve the community as spaces for free-spirited living, connection, collaboration, and creativity continue to nurture these readers’ appreciation for physical books.

LGBTQ+ readers’ desire to shelter from reality with a book in hand is akin to their drive toward more escapist content in movies and TV. In the realm of books and graphic novels, this consumer segment can exercise their Proud Group Trait more freely and authentically.

Action Steps:

    • Examine your print ad placement and prioritize print publications specifically targeted at the LGBTQ+ community.
    • Find inspiration for your creative campaigns in popular, trending books as well as LGBTQ+ consumers’ preferred genres.
    • Leverage the power of smaller influencers and online book fandoms to better connect with this consumer group.
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Other Recent LGBTQ+ Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Alonzo Bailey

Alonzo Bailey
Data Analyst

Alonzo is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. He is a 2019 graduate of Morehouse College. His previous experience includes business and psychological research at Johns Hopkins University – Carey Business School, Columbia Business School, and the University of Maryland.

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Understand and Embrace Multicultural Consumer Media Habits and Channels

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Understand and Embrace Multicultural Consumer Media Habits and Channels
Learn how Multicultural Americans engage with Media, including social media, movies, TV shows, music, reading, and podcasts.

September 30, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Multicultural Consumer Media Habits & Channels presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 Media Habits and Channels Study provides insights across Multicultural segments on the specific platforms American media users go to, their media habits, and their preferences for media content. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes.

Key Finding #1: Multicultural Americans Interact with Various Media Channels

Hispanic and Black Americans are most likely to follow influencers and celebrities on social media. They are also more likely to interact with different media categories (TV, Movies, Music, Books) via social media.

Context:

Hispanic Americans’ younger age and general tech-savviness are part of the reasons they are so dialed into using social media. Black Americans are often at the cutting edge of new trends in the areas of fashion, music, and television and social media is often the best forum to get information first.

Action Step:

    • Partner with emerging influencers and celebrities to appeal to Black and Hispanic Americans.
    • If your brand has a media component, offer ways for Black and Hispanic Americans to interact with it online (e.g., specific social media pages to follow a musician, author, or TV show).

Key Finding #2: Young Multicultural Americans Experience Culture through the Movies They Watch

All Multicultural Americans want diverse representation in the movies they watch, but Black Americans are the most likely to want this. The segment has particularly leaned into horror films.

Context:

Movie genres, specifically ones like Horror, are an opportunity for Black Americans to explore their own histories in America in ways that not only appeal to the segment but also teach others about Black Americans’ history in this country.

Action Step:

    • Movie releases are a viable partnership opportunity for brands. When considering which movie release to partner with, prioritize those with diverse directing, casting, and culturally relevant plot lines.

Key Finding #3: Asian Americans and Unacculturated Hispanic Americans Are More Likely to Watch and Follow the News

While comedy is the most popular form of TV to watch, Unaccultured Hispanic and Asian Americans are more likely than others to watch and follow the news. International news and news that originates from their family’s country of origin are specific types of news the segments’ keep up with.

Context:

Hispanic and Asian Americans are culture-focused and maintaining ties to their heritage is important to them. Following international news is important for these segments who may be recent immigrants from another country or still have family in other parts of the world.

Action Step:

    • Recognize the value in advertising your brand on news channels or news “hours”, particularly to appeal to Hispanic and Asian Americans.

Key Finding #4: Across Multicultural Segments, Music Tied to Cultural Heritage Matters

Multicultural Americans are more likely than White Americans to enjoy listening to music that has a connection to their history and cultural heritage.

Context:

Music that is tied to history or cultural tradition matters to Multicultural Americans who love music because of their personal relationship to it. In addition, certain genres of music, such as Latin music, are now popular for all Americans. The upbeat nature of the music, rhythmic beats, make it appealing whether the lyrics are in English or Spanish.

Action Step:

    • Celebrate the contributions Multicultural Americans have made in music, across different genres.
    • Thoughtfully curate music genres to connect with specific Multicultural segments, but lean into the wide crossover appeal of pop, rock, R&B, and Hip-Hop.

Key Finding #5: Multicultural Americans Enjoy Shopping for Physical Books

While digital and audio books are gaining popularity, Americans still prefer the experience of shopping for and buying a physical book.

Context:

With so many digital media content options, physical books provide a mental break from digital stimulation and that appeals to younger and older Americans alike.

Action Step:

    • Show people reading physical books or browsing in a bookstore in ads and marketing content to resonate with the many readers in the country.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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Understanding Hispanic American Acculturation

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Understanding Hispanic American Acculturation
The Hispanic population in the U.S. is large and growing. Understanding the diversity within the segment as well as their priorities is vital for brands and marketers to grow right alongside this critical American consumer segment.

September 13, 2022
Sudipti Kumar – Associate Director

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As of the 2020 Census, there were 62 million Americans who identified as Hispanic. This segment accounts for over 50% of total population growth in the U.S. and it’s native-born Hispanic Americans– not new immigrants to the country–  who are driving virtually all of that growth.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Understanding Hispanic Americans  presentation.

Importantly, the segment is comprised of three sub-groups across the spectrum of acculturation: acculturatedbicultural, and unacculturated.

Those sub-groups are based on Collage’s own acculturation model designed to better understand the Hispanic segment through cultural preferences. Our model mostly focuses on language usage (Spanish, English, or both) but also includes an identity component. And, when we look at the population of Hispanic Americans by acculturation, we see that the largest and fastest growing group is Bicultural Hispanic Americans. In addition to proportional size, the Bicultural Hispanic segment is also the youngest, ensuring future growth (and importance to your messaging) too.

But, to better understand Hispanic American consumers, you need to go beyond demographic size and acculturation. Our recent research into Hispanic identity and behavior offers a set of key findings for brands and marketers when it comes to understanding and engaging with Hispanic Americans.

    1. Hispanic Americans prefer the terms Hispanic and Latino/Latina as their identifiers. There are also some terms the segment clearly does not prefer.
    2. Ethnicity and country of origin are key parts of Hispanic Americans’  identity and supersede other characteristics, like gender or life stage.
    3. Hispanic Americans are a uniquely positive segment, displaying optimism even when times are tough.
    4. Hispanic Americans are social media super users. The segment’s overall youth and forward-thinking nature have a big part to play in this.
    5. Hispanic Americans want to preserve their culture while living in America, particularly through cooking and enjoying traditional meals.

Keep reading to learn more about each of the key findings above  and download the attached document for a selection of our summary findings.

 

Key Finding #1: Hispanic Americans prefer the terms Hispanic and Latino/Latina as their identifiers. There are also some terms the segment clearly does not prefer.

When it comes to identifying terms, Hispanic Americans clearly have a preference. “Hispanic” and “Latino/Latina” top the list overall for the segment, with “Hispanic American” winning overall especially with Mexican Americans. South Americans and Central Americans are more inclined to use the label Latino/Latina.

For Puerto Ricans and Cuban Americans, their preference for using country of origin as their prime identifier really shows up, as well.

Despite the recent popularity of the term “Latinx” to denote inclusivity, you can see that it clearly does not resonate with many Hispanic Americans;  It’s the lowest on the list, alongside “Latine” and “Person of Color.”

Action Step: Use either the terms Hispanic or Latino/Latina when you want to refer to Hispanic Americans in general.

If your target is Latin Americans living in the US, defer to Latino/Latina. And keep in mind that despite broad appeal, these terms are not technically synonymous. Hispanic refers to people from Spanish-speaking countries, while Latino/Latina refers to the geography of Latin America.

Key Finding #2: Ethnicity and country of origin are key parts of Hispanic Americans’ identity and supersede other characteristics, like gender or life stage.

In a recent survey, we asked Hispanic Americans which three aspects of their identity they would use to describe themselves. Hispanic/Latino heritage (i.e. ethnicity) tops the list at 63%. And when we look at this by Acculturation, we see that the percentage for Hispanic/Latino heritage jumps to 79% for the Unacculturated segment and 68% for the Bicultural Hispanic Americans.

What’s more, country of origin also moves up higher for Unacculturated Hispanic Americans with 46% of them noting this as a key part of who they are. This is likely due to the sub-segment’s stronger affiliation with the U.S. rather than another country. Acculturated Hispanic Americans lean into their personality and race more than other Hispanic Americans. But despite those differences, Hispanic/Latino heritage is still in the top three for the Acculturated segment too.

Action Step: Craft marketing messaging that celebrates the diversity of the segment.

Even when messaging is narrowly targeted to a specific Hispanic sub-segment, the crossover appeal of taking the time to understand the nuances of identity will be seen and valued across the entire segment.

Key Finding #3: Hispanic Americans are a uniquely positive segment, displaying optimism even when times are tough.

Collage Group’s Group Trait work is based on 75 focused, nuanced, and culturally specific agreement scale questions in a targeted survey. The data is analyzed based on rank, differentiation and overall agreement for a target consumer group versus others.

For Hispanic Americans, four Group Traits popped: Culture-Focused, Positivity, Warmth, and Engaged.

Let’s look at one of the key group traits for the segment: Positivity. Here you can see how Hispanic Americans uniquely resonate with the cultural statements “Resilient”, “Optimistic”, and “Destined.” The combination of these three statements helps us understand the positive mindset of Hispanic Americans. Even though the segment has experienced many hardships while immigrating to and living in this country they look excitedly into the future.

Action Step: Offer optimism in these uncertain times by communicating uplifting themes that speak to resilience and overcoming adversity.

That doesn’t mean you should sugar-coat hard realities but do communicate honest messages with confidence and hopefulness.

Key Finding #4: Hispanic Americans are social media super users. The segment’s overall youth and forward-thinking nature have a big part to play in this.

Hispanic Americans are more likely to post on social media daily, visit social media to find communities where they belong and use popular newer social media platforms. In almost every arena, Hispanic Americans are more likely to post on social media and use those platforms for recommendations across categories like restaurants, fitness and exercise, and fashion.

The segment is also younger than any other racial or ethnic groups in America and that certainly plays a role in their collective interest in social media., But their penchant for digital communication and content consumption is also tied to the segment’s unique focus on being forward-thinking and open to new types of technology sooner than others.

Action Step: Speak up and harness word of mouth marketing through social media.​

Hispanic Americans are highly connected through technology and value the opinions of those in their network.

Key Finding #5: Hispanic Americans want to preserve their culture while living in America, particularly through cooking and enjoying traditional meals.

Another group trait that is highly relevant for Hispanic Americans is their Culture-Focus. That means they care a lot about maintaining their heritage even while living in the U.S. There are so many ways to preserve traditions, but cooking and enjoying traditional meals together may be one of the biggest. In fact, 9 in 10 Unacculturated and Bicultural Hispanic Americans believe that cooking meals from their culture is an important way to maintain traditions, and its still pretty high for Acculturated Hispanic Americans too.

Action Step: Highlight Hispanic Americans cooking and sharing traditional meals with their family.

This also promotes their family focus alongside their commitment to maintaining their culture.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Hispanic Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Sudipti Kumar
Associate Director

Sudipti is an Associate Director on Collage Group’s Product and Content team. She is a graduate from NYU’s Stern School of Business where she studied finance and marketing, and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs where she received her Masters in Public Administration. In her spare time, Sudipti enjoys reading, cooking, and learning to crochet.

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Essentials of Hispanic Consumers

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Essentials of Hispanic Consumers
Collage Group’s Essentials of Hispanic Consumers presentation explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research: demographics and economic opportunity, identity, and Group Traits.

September 12, 2022
Sudipti Kumar – Associate Director

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Hispanic Americans are a large and growing U.S. consumer segment both in terms of population and economic power. Brands must better understand this influential consumer group to effectively engage with them through their marketing and advertising.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Essentials of Hispanic Consumers  presentation.

Collage Group’s Essentials of Hispanic Consumers explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research: demographics, identity, and Group Traits to help your brand authentically connect with Hispanic Americans.

Key Insight #1

Hispanic Americans are a growing force in America, and their population will nearly double by 2060.

Asian population is expected to double by 2060

Implication:

Recognize the cultural and economic power of the Hispanic segment today. As their population and purchasing power grows, they will increasingly influence the national culture.

Key Insight #2

Hispanic Americans are not a monolith. Heritage and country of origin matter to their identity, particularly for the Unacculturated and Bicultural segments.

Unacculturated Hispanic Americans identify deeply with their heritage

Implication:

Highlight the rich heritage and contributions of Hispanic Americans in this country. Include messages that speak to the segment’s different cultural backgrounds.

Key Insight #3

Hispanic Americans are increasingly interested in supporting brands that support their race and ethnicity.

Hispanic Americans are incresingly interested in supporting brands that support them

Implication:

Hispanic Americans notice when brands take action to support them. Develop a clear strategy to support Hispanic Americans (through representation, financial commitments, or other methods) and communicate efforts to the community in advertising and public relations.

Key Insight #4:

There are four unique Group Traits important to understanding Hispanic Americans: Culture-focused, Positivity, Warmth, and Engaged.

Hispanic American Group Traits

Implication:

Utilize the Group Traits as ways to connect with Hispanic Americans authentically. For example, to activate on positivity, offer optimism even in uncertain times by communicating uplifting themes in marketing that speak to resilience and overcoming adversity.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Other Recent Hispanic Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Sudipti Kumar
Associate Director

Sudipti is an Associate Director on Collage Group’s Product and Content team. She is a graduate from NYU’s Stern School of Business where she studied finance and marketing, and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs where she received her Masters in Public Administration. In her spare time, Sudipti enjoys reading, cooking, and learning to crochet.

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Understand and Embrace Black Consumer Passion Points

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Understand and Embrace Black Consumer Passion Points
Learn how Black American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, sports and fitness, travel, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Jenny Wolski – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Black Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Powerful Memories Are Made in the Kitchen

Black Americans feel at home cooking and baking in their kitchens.

Context:

Many Black Americans grew up in the kitchen learning how to cook from older family members. They see preparing a meal as time to spend with family, create memories, and express love and care for others through food.

Action Step:

Portray cooking and baking as a full family (plus friends) activity and emphasize the real motivator for Black Americans’ enjoyment making food at home: relationships.

Key Finding #2: Black Travelers Welcome Discomfort

Black Americans are more likely than others to travel to get out of their comfort zone, but they prefer to do so domestically in the U.S.

Context:

Historically, prejudice followed Black Americans along with them on trips. But now, the Greenbook has evolved into influencers and Black consumers’ Group Traits of Determined, Real, Believing, and Forward-thinking merge to make this segment uniquely optimistic and adventurous travelers.

Action Step:

Boost Black Americans’ excitement for U.S. locations and weave local interests into your travel messaging.

Key Finding #3: Black Athletes Are Leaders In and Out of Their Sport

Black Americans are dedicated sports fans who follow their favorite teams, as well as the careers of specific athletes.

Context:

Black athletes have served as American heroes for Black sports fans (and all sports fans) for decades. As a result of that earned trust and influence, Black athletes have often refused to “stick to sports” and have weighed in on important social and politics issues that matter to the Black community. Since 2020, this trend has only ramped up with athletes like Lebron James, Serena Williams, Colin Kaepernick, Maya Moore, and others speaking up for equality.

Action Step:

Recognize the influence and social/political clout of Black athletes and partner with them on marketing efforts.

Key Finding #4: Fashion is a Vehicle for Black Self-Expression

Black Americans are uniquely passionate about fashion. They consider themselves trendsetters and enjoy expressing their personalities with style.

Context:

Self expression is an essential element of Black Americans’ lives. In fact, they are more likely to see themselves as unique, unabashed, and authentic than others. For many Black Americans, individuality is something to be celebrated across all aspects of life.

Action Step:

When you’re engaging Black consumers, de-emphasize uniformity and function in favor of fashion’s fun and uncommon side.

Key Finding #5: Black Americans Embrace the “Gamer” Identity

Black Americans love to play video games and even are self-proclaimed “gamers.”

Context:

For Black Americans, video games are a vehicle for some of the things they value most: connecting with their friends and family, self-expression, and personal achievement.

Action Step:

Resist the urge to see video games as just a “game.” Instead, emphasize the bigger motivators for why Black Americans love them: social connection, individuality, and skill-building.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Black Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jenny Wolski

Jenny Wolski
Analyst

Jenny is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2021 graduate from The George Washington University where she studied Statistics and Sociology. In her spare time, Jenny is often on a hike enjoying nature.

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Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points
Learn how American Women engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Multicultural Women like cooking and baking the most

Women are less likely than Men to love cooking. Multicultural Women lean into cooking more than Non-Hispanic White Women and are the most into baking.

Context:

For Multicultural Women, cooking and baking are opportunities to connect with their heritage. It can be challenging to find baked goods they grew up eating, so baking them instead is a helpful option.

Action Step:

Provide examples of how your brand can help Multicultural Women connect with their cultural heritage through food.

Key Finding #2: Multicultural Women love to travel to connect with their heritage and be immersed in the culture

Multicultural Women are more likely to want to travel to places tied to their family’s heritage. When they do travel, they want to be immersed in the local culture through experiencing the food and living like a local.

Context:

Hispanic and Asian Americans are culture-focused and traveling to places that mean something to them culturally is one way they show their love of their culture. Asian Women are most likely to want to live like a local while traveling because of their inquisitive group trait, which shows up in their desire to learn about other places.

Action Step:

When showcasing travel as part of an overall marketing strategy, highlight what it means to travel like a local with cultural immersion at the center of the experience. Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.

Key Finding #3: Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise

Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise and will work out regardless of needing to do it to lose weight or be healthy. Walking is the most popular way to work out.

Context:

Multicultural Women’s love of fitness and exercise is part of a larger trend of being more health and fitness conscious. This shows up across category.

Action Step:

Showcase how your brand can help Multicultural Women reach their fitness goals. Walking is a very popular form of exercise, so highlight walking for its many benefits.

Key Finding #4: Women gamers prefer playing on their own

Women are more likely to play video games by themselves and on their mobile phones.

Context:

Women routinely experience bias and harassment online and that includes online gaming. As a result, many Women are choosing games that allow them to play alone and avoid toxic online interactions. Mobile games are often a more solo experience which may be way they lean into this channel for gaming more. However, Women are still active leaders in gaming and should be celebrated as such.

Action Step:

Showcase Women as leaders in the gaming industry and promote greater positivity for Women who enjoy gaming. It is also helpful to highlight solo games over more collaborative ones when engaging with Women in the gaming space.

Key Finding #5: Women are eco-conscious when it comes to fashion

Women, particularly those who are younger, love thrift shopping.

Context:

Women are conscientious shoppers. They care about the future of the world and thrift shopping is a sustainable, thoughtful, and economical way to shop.

Action Step:

Highlight your brand’s sustainable features and how your brand supports Women in being conscientious eco-friendly fashionistas.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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