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Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points
Learn how American Women engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Multicultural Women like cooking and baking the most

Women are less likely than Men to love cooking. Multicultural Women lean into cooking more than Non-Hispanic White Women and are the most into baking.

Context:

For Multicultural Women, cooking and baking are opportunities to connect with their heritage. It can be challenging to find baked goods they grew up eating, so baking them instead is a helpful option.

Action Step:

Provide examples of how your brand can help Multicultural Women connect with their cultural heritage through food.

Key Finding #2: Multicultural Women love to travel to connect with their heritage and be immersed in the culture

Multicultural Women are more likely to want to travel to places tied to their family’s heritage. When they do travel, they want to be immersed in the local culture through experiencing the food and living like a local.

Context:

Hispanic and Asian Americans are culture-focused and traveling to places that mean something to them culturally is one way they show their love of their culture. Asian Women are most likely to want to live like a local while traveling because of their inquisitive group trait, which shows up in their desire to learn about other places.

Action Step:

When showcasing travel as part of an overall marketing strategy, highlight what it means to travel like a local with cultural immersion at the center of the experience. Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.

Key Finding #3: Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise

Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise and will work out regardless of needing to do it to lose weight or be healthy. Walking is the most popular way to work out.

Context:

Multicultural Women’s love of fitness and exercise is part of a larger trend of being more health and fitness conscious. This shows up across category.

Action Step:

Showcase how your brand can help Multicultural Women reach their fitness goals. Walking is a very popular form of exercise, so highlight walking for its many benefits.

Key Finding #4: Women gamers prefer playing on their own

Women are more likely to play video games by themselves and on their mobile phones.

Context:

Women routinely experience bias and harassment online and that includes online gaming. As a result, many Women are choosing games that allow them to play alone and avoid toxic online interactions. Mobile games are often a more solo experience which may be way they lean into this channel for gaming more. However, Women are still active leaders in gaming and should be celebrated as such.

Action Step:

Showcase Women as leaders in the gaming industry and promote greater positivity for Women who enjoy gaming. It is also helpful to highlight solo games over more collaborative ones when engaging with Women in the gaming space.

Key Finding #5: Women are eco-conscious when it comes to fashion

Women, particularly those who are younger, love thrift shopping.

Context:

Women are conscientious shoppers. They care about the future of the world and thrift shopping is a sustainable, thoughtful, and economical way to shop.

Action Step:

Highlight your brand’s sustainable features and how your brand supports Women in being conscientious eco-friendly fashionistas.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points

Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points
Learn how LGBTQ+ American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, sports and fitness, travel, fashion, games, and home and garden.

August 22, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

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Passion Points are the activities that get people excited. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Food Is for Socializing

LGBTQ+ Americans love to share their food experience (IRL and online) with other people.

Context:

LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely to value being hospitable and congenial with others. They’re also more likely to “consider someone ‘family’ if we are really close, even if we’re not related.” So, sharing experiences with others is a central part of their daily lives.

The LGBTQ+ segment also skews young, so social media and digital communications are second nature. That extends to using those mediums to consume and share pictures, videos, and information about food and meals.

Action Step:

    • Celebrate meals. When representing LGBTQ+ Americans and their food experiences, remember to highlight the social aspects of making food and eating together.
    • Feed LGBTQ+ Americans’ feeds with digital food content. Recipes, inspiration, influencers, and food events are all of interest for these “foodies.”

Key Finding #2: LGBTQ+ Travelers Seek Adventure

LGBTQ+ Americans of all ages and younger non-LGBTQ+ Americans enjoy getting out of their comfort zone when they travel.

Context:

While finding travel locations welcoming of LGBTQ+ travelers is important, LGBTQ+ Americans also love to explore new cultures and enjoy new experiences. They’re unique Group Trait of Worldly highlights their penchant to be open-minded, cosmopolitan and experiential.

Action Step:

    • Emphasize new and the exciting travel opportunities for LGBTQ+ Americans. The world is big and interesting; Help them discover it.

Key Finding #3: Video Game Fandom Provides Community for the LGBTQ+ Segment

Younger LGBTQ+ Americans uniquely love video games and see them as a vehicle for self-expression and socializing.

Context: LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely than others to value being unique and creative. The segment also prioritizes happiness and fun in their lives. It’s no doubt, then, why LGBTQ+ consumers would flock to video games as a way of enjoying life and creative storytelling. All the better to experience it with friends. Action Step:
    • Emphasize the social dynamic of video games and celebrate the expressive possibility of joining others in playing your favorite game.

Key Finding #4: LGBTQ+ People Are Social Sports Fans

LGBTQ+ Americans may be less interested in following sports, in general, but they are more likely than others to host sports-viewing parties and go to sports bars to watch games with other people.

Context:

As a segment, LGBTQ+ Americans value being hospitable and congenial higher than other Americans. They also are more likely to say they consider someone “family” if they’re close, but not actually related.

Connecting with others is a deep priority for this segment and sports and fitness is a key way many LGBTQ+ Americans choose to build relationships with others.

Action Step:

    • Emphasize the social aspects of fandom when engaging LGBTQ+ Americans. It’s not so much about the teams or the players, it’s about the fans.

Key Finding #5: LGBTQ+ Americans Use Style to Uniquely Express Themselves

Fashion is a stand-out Passion Point for LGBTQ+ Americans. They see themselves as fashionable and enjoy self-expression and bold choices in their style.

Context:

For many LGBTQ+ Americans, celebrating their uniqueness is not only fun, but also an essential element of discovering themselves. Fashion provides a creative, expressive, and individual outlet for celebrating their own identities externally.

And given how challenging it can be to come out when society isn’t always welcoming, the desire to embrace style and fashion towards self-identity cuts across age and generation.

Action Step:

    • Lean into fashion with LGBTQ+ consumers and don’t be afraid to push some boundaries and innovate. Remember: Style is a tool of self-expression, so use it as a communication tool to this fashion-forward segment.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Engaging Women Small Business Owners

Engaging Women Small Business Owners

Small businesses drive the American economy, and the number of women-owned small businesses is growing. Read on for more information about how to connect with women small business owners by understanding how they see themselves, their goals, challenges, and motivations for partnering with larger companies.

June 16, 2022
Jenny Wolski – Analyst

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Nearly all private businesses in the U.S. are small businesses and 1.2 million of those companies are women-owned. The number of women-owned small businesses is growing, and women small business owners are highly engaged in the day-to-day decisions about their business. As a result, women small business owners make up an important segment with whom marketers and larger businesses should engage and build partnerships. In our recent Small Business Owners Study we look at small business owner’s identity, future outlook, operations, and relationship with larger companies. Read below for highlights of the study related to women small business owners and contact us to receive insights for the full picture.

Key Insight #1

Women small business owners self-identify as purposeful individuals who think about their impact on the world and value community involvement. They possess a strong desire to have their business connect to other women in their community.

Women small business owners are determined to make a difference in their communities

Implication:

Women small business owners see themselves as perseverant, conscientious, and community-oriented, so focus in on those attributes in your communication with the segment.

Key Insight #2

Women small business owners are feeling less confident than men small business owners about the current health of their business. As a result of a more tepid business outlook, they are less likely to aim for expansion.

Women small business owners are less likely to report improvements in their business

Implication:

Recognize that women small business owners haven’t had the easiest year and focus communications on how your company may be able to lend a hand.

Key Insight #3

Women small business owners are hands-on leaders that play a significant— if not complete role— when making operational decisions including benefits, finance, technology, etc.

Implication:

Address marketing communication directly to women small business owners. Despite their busy and varied schedules, owners are usually at the heart of their company’s day-to-day decisions.

Key Insight #4

Women small business owners are looking for product innovation partnerships with large companies.

Implication:

Provide women small business owners with the tools and knowledge they need to innovate.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Women Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Jenny Wolski

Jenny Wolski
Analyst

Jenny is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2021 graduate from The George Washington University where she studied Statistics and Sociology. In her spare time, Jenny is often on a hike enjoying nature.

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How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres

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How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres
Mother’s Day is an important holiday for Americans of all backgrounds, but Multicultural segments—especially moms and dads versus non-parents—have nuanced attitudes and celebration styles. Read on for insights curated from our Holidays and Occasions research.

Mother’s Day is one of Americans’ most beloved holidays. It’s a day dedicated to Moms (and maternal figures), honoring their important role in the family. 85% of Americans celebrate it, with an especially strong emphasis from Hispanic Americans (91%). Mother’s Day has the fourth highest average per-person spending of any holiday or occasion according to the National Retail Federation. Mother’s Day occurs every second Sunday of May, which means this year (2022), it will be on May 8th.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

However, it’s important to note that while motherhood is celebrated all over the world, it doesn’t always occur on the same date as it does in the United States. For instance, some Latin American countries such as Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala celebrate Mother’s Day (El Día de las Madres) on May 10th every year. Many Hispanic-American consumers with heritage from these countries, especially Bicultural and Unacculturated, may prefer to uphold the tradition on the day from their country of origin instead of—or in addition to—the date Mother’s Day is celebrated in the United States. So, this is an important nuance not to be overlooked when activating on multicultural consumers. Plus, it offers an additional day to connect with your brand’s target consumer groups!

As your brand strategizes on how best to resonate with multicultural consumers, take note of the key similarities and differences in how each racial and ethnic segment (as well as differences among Parents and Non-Parents of each demographic) perceives of and celebrates Mother’s Day. Download the attached presentation and read on for key insights and takeaways.

Key Insight #1:

Hispanic Americans are highly involved on Mother’s Day, and this is true for both Parents and Non-Parents. They have higher celebration rates compared to other segments and are usually more likely to participate in celebration activities like hosting a barbecue/cookout, giving cards, and buying gifts.

A Deeper Look:

For Hispanic Americans, Mother’s Day is a family affair. Everyone comes together to honor the matriarch of the family. “It’s important to celebrate mothers because they are the building blocks of the family and they are the teachers,” says Maria Miranda, assistant director of the Arizona Latino Arts and Culture Center. Typical celebrations include extended family gatherings with plenty of food, music, and flowers.

Collage Group’s research on Family Connection underscores the importance of family relationships for Hispanic Americans. Mother’s Day is a natural extension of the segment’s love and appreciation for close family bonds and festive gatherings.

Action Step:

Acknowledge Hispanic Americans’ culturally-dual Mother’s Day celebrations, including the difference in celebration dates, through your marketing efforts. Incorporate the nuances that Hispanic Americans consider meaningful aspects of the holiday, such as large family gatherings with food and music.

Key Insight #2:

Black and Asian parents (both Moms and Dads) feel especially strongly about celebrating ALL the women in their life for Mother’s Day.

A Deeper Look:

Our research on Cultural Traits has showed us that these two segments are highly community-oriented, which likely explains their stronger association with Mother’s Day as a holiday honoring all women. Parents of these segments are particularly attuned to the role that other women in their communities play in raising their children, such as sisters, aunts, cousins, Godmothers, and friends.

For the Black segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the community’s history of adversity and the necessity to create a strong network of support for one another. It’s possible that as many Black Americans become parents themselves, they reflect even more strongly on the role that many women in their community had played in helping to raise them. 

For the Asian segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the segment’s cultural emphasis on respect and humility. Many Asian countries are more collectivist, meaning that social norms prioritize the community over the individual. This may help explain why Asian Parents would be more likely to want to recognize the contributions of all women on Mother’s Day. 

Action Step:

Create cross-cultural appeal by expanding your brand’s Mother’s Day marketing efforts to be inclusive of all women that play an important maternal or supporting role in the family. Connection with others is a theme that consumers across backgrounds resonate with universally. Be sure to infuse authentic cultural cues and segment-specific nuances to connect deeply both within segments, as well as across segments.

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Essentials of Women Consumers

Essentials of Women Consumers
Collage Group’s Essentials of Women Consumers presentation explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research for American Women: demographics and segment context, identity, and Group Traits.

March 21, 2022
Giana Damianos – Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

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Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural, and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all household purchasing decisions. But many advertisers are missing the mark in their portrayals of this powerful consumer segment. While gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman in recent years, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising.

Read on and fill out the form for more insights from our American Women research.

Representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about their identity. Brands today must evolve to effectively understand and engage the modern American woman.

Collage Group’s Essentials of Women Consumers explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research: demographicsidentity, and Group Traits to help your brand authentically connect with Women.

Key Insight #1:

Young women are especially likely to report their gender has become increasingly important over the past few years.

My gender has become increasingly important

A Deeper Look:

The greater focus on intersectional identities over the past few years has made it easier for younger people to embrace and recognize the importance of all aspects of their identity, including the important role gender plays, especially in the lives of women.

Action Step:

Bring a nuanced portrayal of women today to your marketing efforts – relatable specificity beats painting with too broad of a brush here.

Key Insight #2:

Women across age ranges are more likely than men to say that the only achievement they care about is being happy with what they do.

A Deeper Look:

Many Women have begun to reject #GirlBoss culture and the pressure to prove themselves as equally ambitious as men. Instead, they’re redefining what success means altogether – and doing it on the individual level.

Action Step: Let go of traditional, patriarchal definitions of success and instead, portray success on individualistic terms. Acknowledge that women have the power to choose the direction of their lives – and the choices are as unique as the individual.

Key Insight #3:

Women are particularly mindful about what they say and how it may affect others. They are much less likely than Men to speak their mind if it might hurt someone’s feelings.

I speak my mind even when it hurts feelings

A Deeper Look:

Women tend to have different emotional intelligence (EQ) strengths than men, such as higher levels of empathy, greater mindfulness in interpersonal relationships, and a stronger sense of social responsibility–all of which culminate in conscientiousness toward others.

Action Step: Portrayals of Women should highlight their soft skills as their superpower–and steer clear of portraying emotion and empathy as a pitfall or stereotypical trope.

Key Insight #4:

Women often feel uncomfortable putting their own needs first and feel a stronger obligation than Men to take care of others.

I do not feel comfortable putting my needs first

A Deeper Look:

Women’s discomfort with putting their own needs first before taking care of others is likely tied to longstanding social norms and gender roles. This feeling could also be tied to lack of self-confidence or self-worth. Women’s sense of obligation may also be out of necessity, since Women often face more pressures and stresses than Men.

Action Step: Give Women the space and permission to prioritize themselves and help alleviate the everyday pressures they face.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Giana Damianos
Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

Giana joined Collage in 2019 from Indiana University, where she studied economics, political science and psychology. In her spare time, Giana is getting to know Washington DC and its historic architecture.

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Insights for Engaging & Celebrating Women

Insights for Engaging & Celebrating Women
Collage Group Hosts A Conversation About Gender Equity with Pandora, TVOne, JAFRA and Diageo in Celebration of Women’s History Month Discussion.

Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all purchasing decisions. Gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman, however, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising.

Representation alone is not enough to prove that your brand cares about their identity. Has your brand evolved to effectively understand and engage the modern American woman?

Read on and fill out the form to watch the replay and hear how brand leaders responded.

Collage Group had the pleasure of hosting four leaders from our member brands to explore insights and ideas for brands to support women and gender equality. Fill out the form to watch a replay of the presentation and panel discussion, and download an excerpt of the insights:

Collage Group Director of Product & Content Natalie Griffith kicked off the event with cultural intelligence on the demographic profile and cultural traits of women consumers, as well as insights from our Holidays & Occasions work specific to Women’s History Month.

Natalie’s presentation was followed by a conversation with Collage Group member panelists moderated by Zekeera Belton, Vice President of Client Services. Panelists included:

    • Nicole Buchanan, Pandora, National Sales and Strategy Lead, Multicultural Growth Segments
    • Audrey Cochran, TVOne, Vice President, Research
    • Andrea Hernandez, JAFRA, Sr. Brand Marketing Manager, U.S.
    • Tatiana Stadukhina, Diageo, Vice President, Johnnie Walker & Buchanan’s

Panelists answered key questions about their challenges and successes in authentically engaging and supporting women, including:

Q1: Women are powerful influencers in all aspects of social, cultural and business leadership, and they dominate consumer spending, making around 70%-80% of all purchasing decisions. How has your brand evolved to effectively understand and engage women consumers – and harness the power of their influence?

Q2: Gender identity has become increasingly important to the modern American woman, however, only about half of women say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their gender in advertising. How has your brand worked to address this – and other challenges – to effective portrayals of American women?

Q3: The disruptions caused by the pandemic have disproportionately impacted women, specifically working moms, and could lead to long-lasting consequences for gender equality in the workplace. How is your brand supporting the modern American woman and taking steps to authentically support gender equality and drive progress?

Q4: How is your brand or company applying consumer insights on American women to support Diversity and Inclusion efforts, such as addressing the gender pay gap?

Q5: What do you think women – and the majority of Americans – are looking for from brands?

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Understanding and Embracing LGBTQ+ Terminology

Understanding and Embracing LGBTQ+ Terminology
The LGBTQ+ segment is large and growing. An important part of connecting with the segment is understanding and embracing LGBTQ+ terminology. Read on for more information on what terms the community prefers for group and individual identifiers, as well as how and when they prefer to use pronouns.

March 4th, 2021
Jill Rosenfeld – Data Analyst

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When talking about the LGBTQ+ community, there are seemingly endless acronyms, terms, and flags to choose from, and it can be difficult to know which ones to use. Getting terminology right is about more than saying the right word to refer to the right person, it’s about dignity and empathy. Terminology is really a matter of respect: saying I see you, and I affirm your identity. In our recent study, we focused on how the LGBTQ+ community uses community and individual identifiers, as well as pronouns. Continue reading for key insights on each.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our LGBTQ+  Terminology presentation.

Community Identifiers

At Collage Group, we use “LGBTQ+” to refer to any and all people who are anything except straight and cisgender – that is, people who are attracted to their same gender, multiple genders, people who don’t experience sexual attraction, transgender and non-binary people, and a whole host of others that fall under the “plus”.

To lay it out more specifically:

    • L and G: Lesbian and gay, those who are attracted to people of the same gender.
    • B: Bisexual, those attracted to multiple genders.
    • T: Transgender, a term different in kind than the previous three and referring to those who identify with a gender other than the one they were assigned at birth.
    • And finally Q+: Queer and questioning. And the plus refers to all the other labels out there – pansexual, asexual, non-binary, and beyond.

Collage Group uses this term because it allows us to be specific and inclusive, referring to the whole community and the subgroups. There’s a lot of ambiguity in acronyms like these, it’s hard to place firm definitions on people – Everyone is complicated, likely to change and famously resistant to being put in boxes!

When we asked the segment to choose their preferred terms, LGBTQ+ came out on top, followed by LGBTQ. Within subgroups, we see that younger and gender non-conforming people (those identifying as transgender and/or non-binary) were more likely to pick expansive options like LGBTQ+ and LGBTQIA+, and less likely to pick narrower terms like “gay community.” This data shows that young and gender non-conforming people – who are mostly, themselves, young – are more understanding of the diversity of the community and want to recognize it and call it out.

This focus on diversity also shows up in the evolution of the Pride Flag in recent years. While LGBTQ+ people are still most likely to use the traditional rainbow flag to represent the community, younger and gender non-conforming people are gravitating more towards the newer Progress and Intersex Progress Pride flags, which include colors to represent the transgender and intersex communities as well as people of color.

Young and Gender Non-conforming LGBTQ+ People Are Especially Likely to Use “LGBTQ+” as a Community Term

Which of the following terms do you most often use to describe the community of people who do not identify as straight/heterosexual and/or with the gender assigned to them at birth? (LGBTQ+ Respondents)

Total Ages 18-40 Ages 41-75 Gender Non-Conforming Gender Conforming
LGBTQ+ Community
27%
31%
20%
36%
25%
LGBTQ Community
19%
18%
19%
15%
19%
LGBT Community
13%
13%
13%
11%
14%
LGBTQIA+ Community
12%
15%
7%
15%
11%
Gay Community
10%
8%
15%
4%
12%
Queer Community
3%
3%
2%
8%
2%
GLBT Community
1%
0%
2%
1%
1%
I do not use any terms to refer to this community
13%
9%
20%
8%
15%

Individual Identifiers

When it comes to the terms people use to describe themselves, we see an incredible variety and some terms we might expect to be less common are actually resonating with a lot of people. The terms pansexual and queer were very popular (pansexual referring to being attracted to all genders). This reflects the growing idea that sexuality is fluid and people prefer not to put themselves boxes.

We also see 4% and 3% of LGBTQ+ people identifying as asexual and demisexual, respectively. These are terms for people who either do not experience sexual attraction (asexual), and people who only experience sexual attraction to people they feel an emotional connection to (demisexual). We also asked about aromantic and demiromantic. These terms refer to people who never or only sometimes experience romantic attraction.

The separation of romantic and sexual attractions opens a whole other world of terminology, and we could only fit in some of it in the survey. For example, someone might identify as asexual and panromantic, meaning they do not experience sexual attraction but can experience romantic attraction to people of all genders. That’s why we allowed people to choose more than one term here. The ways that people refer to themselves are infinite.

One important thing I need to point out here, based on our methodology, is that these percentages are not supposed to indicate the actual percentage of the LGBTQ+ population that identifies as each of these terms. Because we had a quota system in place to makes sure that we got enough sample from the L, G, B, T, and Q groups, we’ve ended up overrepresenting some and underrepresenting others.

For example, some estimates say that bisexual people make up more than half of the total segment, far more than the 37% of our sample. This likely means that there are even more pansexual and queer people out there too, because “bisexual” is the term more common in surveys and everyday life that these people whose sexuality is fluid or who are attracted to more than one gender are likely to choose.

Younger and Gender Non-conforming People Were More Likely to Choose Labels Including “Pansexual”, “Queer”, and “Asexual”

You mentioned that [previous answer] best describes your sexuality. But, we know those options may be too general to best describe you. From this longer list, which of the following do you identify with? (LGBTQ+ Respondents).

Total Ages 18-40 Ages 41-75 Gender Non-Conforming Gender Conforming
Bisexual
37%
35%
41%
36%
37%
Gay
29%
28%
30%
23%
31%
Lesbian
26%
26%
26%
15%
29%
Pansexual
10%
12%
6%
16%
8%
Queer
8%
11%
4%
17%
6%
Asexual
4%
5%
2%
9%
3%
Demisexual
3%
4%
1%
8%
1%
I'm not sure
2%
2%
2%
7%
1%
Demiromatic
2%
2%
1%
5%
1%
Aromantic
2%
2%
1%
6%
1%

Pronouns

Finally, we wanted to get an idea of people’s opinions about pronouns, and whether it’s appropriate to ask other people to tell you their pronouns. Pronouns are more than just grammar, they’re a part of our identities. About one third of LGBTQ+ people think that others should always ask for other people’s pronouns, and the same amount say that they always put their own pronouns in their social media profiles. A not-insignificant amount of non-LGBTQ+ people say the same – about a quarter of them. Even younger LGBTQ+ people, about half of them, agree that people should always ask for other people’s pronouns. And gender non-conforming people are the most likely of all subgroups to agree, at 65%.

One Third of LGBTQ+ People Say One Should Always Ask about Pronouns

The same number say they always include pronouns on social media profiles:

LGBTQ+ Non-LGBTQ+
People should always ask for other people's prounouns
36%
24%
I put my pronouns in all my social media profiles
36%
24%

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent LGBTQ+ Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity

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Insights You Need to Engage and Activate Parents and Kids Across Race and Ethnicity
Collage Group Launches Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program

American consumer attitudes continue to evolve, and to help you keep pace, Collage Group is incredibly excited to announce our new Parents & Kids Program as part of our leading Cultural Intelligence Platform. This new offering, created with input from nearly a dozen Collage members, is designed to cover the insights marketing and consumer insights professionals need to engage and activate parents and kids across race and ethnicity. Based on our scoping, there is no other syndicated resource available that offers full coverage of parents and kids with race and ethnicity overlays.

Fill out the form below for more details on the new program, including reporting breakouts and content.

Why focus on Parents & Kids?

Demographic change amplifies the need to effectively resonate with America’s diverse parents and their children. In fact, the generations most likely to have children are between 5 and 12 percent more racially and ethnically diverse than older generations.

And, multicultural Americans are 10% more likely to have children under 18 living in their households.

Household with Children Under 18 Present Average Household Size
40% Hispanic
3.4 Hispanic
34% Asian
3.0 Asian
27% Black
2.6 Black
23% White
2.4 White

For many brands, the age of kids is also especially important given the development of decision-making processes–our research will dig deeper into this area. From birth to age 3 children are largely dependent on parental decision-making. As children age, they develop more capacity to make their own decisions.

What’s included in the Parents & Kids Cultural Intelligence Program?

Starting this spring, our new Parents & Kids Program will unveil how culture impacts the roles that moms and dads play in their children’s lives, with insights including:

    • the parenting style(s) they embrace
    • the values they prioritize instilling in their kids
    • how they navigate the impact of the changing media landscape and shifting social norms on their children

The Program also provides insight into how the culture, age and gender of the child impacts parental attitudes and behaviors, including:

    • how they respond to their children’s preferences and desires
    • how they select products and services for their kids across category
    • when and how they “hand-off” decision-making to their kids across category

Collage Group is committed to conducting specific research on both parents and kids to provide unparalleled insights, as many brands have a significant gap in their understanding of the way culture impacts parenting and the parent-child decision-making process. We hope you’ll find value in this new research.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Health and Wellness Across Gender

Health and Wellness Across Gender
Men and Women have unique perspectives, needs, and experiences related to health insurance and health care. Keep reading for key insights, and a downloadable deck to help your brand or organization better connect with these segments.
 

Americans are increasingly embracing a consumer mindset when it comes to healthcare. Men and Women alike are shopping around, comparing prices, and seeking more information than they have in the past. They are doing this because heath care has changed – it has expanded choice and shifted costs.

To win in this constantly evolving space, brands and organizations need to understand men and women’s unique health-related perspectives and how they impact their engagement with health insurers and providers.

Collage Group’s 2021/2022 Health & Wellness Study leverages data captured from more than 3,500 Americans to help brands understand how health-related attitudes and behaviors differ by gender. Our research reveals how an emerging consumer mindset impacts Americans engagement with both the health insurance and health care provider space. We explore barriers to insurance coverage, drivers and barriers to trust and satisfaction, provider preferences, receptivity to provider advice, and more.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

#1: Affordability is the Top Barrier for the Uninsured

The high cost of healthcare for Americans is not news, we know that men and women both face increasing costs and are seeking ways to offset them. But for women, costs are even higher earlier in life, thanks to increased incidence of many chronic conditions, as well as the healthcare costs associated with their reproductive years. This leads many to cut costs by forgoing care or insurance altogether – lack of affordability is the top reason why uninsured women don’t have coverage.

Affordability is also the top reason why men don’t have insurance, albeit at a much lower rate. But what’s interesting – and actionable for healthcare brands – is that men are twice as likely as women to say that they don’t have health insurance because they don’t know how to purchase it. They’re also twice as likely to say they don’t have health insurance because they don’t need it.

Best Practice: The Nevada Health Link took a creative approach to attracting the cost conscious uninsured. Their creative campaign titled, “You Can’t Afford to Not Be Insured”, highlighted the savings insurance provides when faced with a variety of common ailments compared to paying out of pocket – presenting insurance as a relative value.

#2: Men Seek Insurance Partnership Through Communication

Communication with their health insurance provider is particularly important for New Wave Men – those who are 26-41 in this study. When asked what insurance companies might do to be seen as a partner rather than a barrier in improving health, New Wave men were significantly more likely to say “If I had a person at the insurance company I could easily communicate with.”

New Wave Men Seek Insurance Partnership

Best Practice: The state of Minnesota health insurance exchange, or “MNSure”, recently ran a campaign highlighting the communication support provided to those seeking to enroll. MNSure utilizes a network of “assisters” who provide 1:1 support on social channels, year round. The ads seen below were designed to be shared by the assister network across social channels, so individuals could reach out to the assisters directly to receive support, or through the provided contact information.

MNSure Highlights Certified Navigators

#3: New Wave Women Have Endured Negative Healthcare Services, Leading to Lower Healthcare Satisfaction  

Of all segments we looked at in this study, younger women (26-41yrs old) have the lowest level of satisfaction of their health care providers. And the unfortunate truth behind this number seems to be that they have simply had more negative experiences with health care providers in the past. In fact, younger women are significantly more likely to have experienced literally every negative experience we asked about – from doctors rushing through visits and not listening to them, to lifestyle judgment and pressured decision making.

The silver lining of the negative experiences women have had in the past is that they now know what they want from health care providers. Women want personalized care, from doctors who understand their unique healthcare needs, and they want it delivered in a way that is efficient and effective.

Young women most likely to receive bad service

Best Practice: Recognizing that the needs of women weren’t being completely met through traditional providers, Maven Health set up gap-filling coverage tailored to the needs of women. Maven provides detailed information from the comfort of an app, but also personal concierge service and virtual visits with regular providers to ensure women get the personal support they want.

Health care preferences

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America Now: Younger LGBTQ+ Americans Have High Expectations for Brands

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America Now: Younger LGBTQ+ Americans Have High Expectations for Brands

This research is part of a series that expands on our 2021 Roundtable Presentation, America Now. Read on to learn more about LGBTQ+ consumers, their perspective on gender and sexual identities, and what they expect from brands like yours.

Brands can better engage with consumers by understanding how they view different aspects of their own identity. Race, ethnicity, age, sexuality, and gender are just a few of the many elements of a person’s identity impacting how people see themselves and shaping their expectations for brands. LGBTQ+ Americans, especially those who are younger, tell us that their sexuality is becoming an increasingly important aspect of their identity. As a result, brands have to step up their inclusive marketing practices and oftentimes that means deftly engaging with social and political issues.

In a recent survey, Collage Group asked people to choose the most important aspect of their identity. Personality came out on top, followed by race, and country of origin. Just 8 percent of LGBTQ+ people responded that sexuality is the most important aspect of their identity. However, the importance of sexual identity is on the rise for this segment. Over 50 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents agree that their sexuality has become an increasingly important part of their identity in recent years. This is especially true for those between the ages of 18 and 40 years old. Younger LGBTQ+ are also significantly more likely to say their sexuality plays an increasingly important role in their identity than older LGBTQ+ Americans.

Importance of Sexual Identity for LGBTQ+ People

As sexuality becomes a more important element in how LGBTQ+ see themselves, brands must improve their efforts to accurately represent sexuality and gender in advertising — especially when targeting younger and multicultural LGBTQ+ consumers. Only 39 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents say they’re satisfied with portrayals of their sexuality in advertising, significantly less than the approximately 53 percent of non-LGBTQ+ respondents who agree. Seeing their own sexual identity portrayed in advertising matters a lot to 42 percent of young LGBTQ+, significantly higher than older LGBTQ+ respondents. Similarly, for gender portrayals, over a third of all LGBTQ+ say it matters a lot to see advertisements with people of the same gender identity. Doing this comes with great benefits, as young LGBTQ+ are more likely to buy products and services from brands that challenge gender stereotypes in their advertisements.

LBTBQ+ Americans identify more with their sexuality

Beyond mere representation in advertising, LGBTQ+ consumers also desire to see brands engage in social and political issues impacting their community. About 40 percent of LGBTQ+ respondents agree that brands should focus on social and political issues even if they don’t directly relate to their products and services. 

Overall, most LGBTQ+ respondents prefer brands to get involved by educating consumers about LGBTQ+ rights and discrimination. However, young LGBTQ+ consumers would also like to see brands hire more LGBTQ+ in leadership positions and donate to LGBTQ+ causes.

America Now - LGBTQ and Identity - Collage Group

Contact us to find out how you can access the full America Now report with these insights and much more.

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