Posts

America’s Iconic Brands Most Effective at Winning Hispanic Consumers

,
America’s Iconic Brands Most Effective at Winning Hispanic Consumers
I had the pleasure of taking part in one of our recent in-house studies, which took a look at over 250 iconic brands. In the end, we were able to objectively identify the top 10 brands for Hispanic consumers. 

October 4, 2022
David Evans – Chief Insights Officer

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

The evaluation examined brand performance as part of our monthly CultureRate survey and assessed cultural resonance for each major demographic segment.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Top 10 Brands for Hispanic Consumers presentation.

Based on Collage Group’s proprietary metric – the Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ) – the top brands for Hispanic consumers are Walmart, Netflix, McDonald’s, Nike, YouTube, Ross, Google, Visa, Amazon, and Dove. These brands showcase two elements: 1) strong commitment to the Hispanic community and 2) excellence in marketing executions that authentically resonate with the cultural traits and needs of Hispanic consumers.

I should note, the CultureRate database is the largest of its kind available, and its growing annually by over 200,000 responses, or 30 million unique datapoints. Brand leaders apply the findings from CultureRate:Ad and CultureRate:Brand to build cultural fluency, the capability to drive total market growth from inclusive, diverse-led marketing.

As stated, we use the B-CFQ. By this standard, the 10 brands proved to be well ahead of all others in terms of appealing to America’s Hispanic segment. Additionally, three of the brands don’t appear in the top 10 for other segments, and this shows how each segment is distinct.

The B-CFQ reflects brand performance across six dimensions: Fit; Relevance, Memories (of positive past experiences), Values, Trust, and Advocacy (which is the willingness to spread positive word-of-mouth).

With regard to Hispanic consumers, all 10 top brands excelled on Fit and Relevance. Fit measures whether the brand offers a personally desirable product, and Relevance pertains to whether the brand connects with a consumer’s group identity. Moreover, each of the top 10 brands also scored particularly well on one to two additional B-CFQ dimensions.

Xue Bai, the Director of Brand and Ad Health Measurement explains it best: “Brands win by taking the lead in the areas of Fit and Relevance. But the true winners go one step further by differentiating in one or more other areas.”

Bai says successful brands truly excel at creating positive past experiences for consumers, earning their deep trust, or driving positive word-of-mouth. And she points out that each of the 10 brands named have taken these actions within the Hispanic community.

Bai says brands should build their core on Fit and Relevance, and after that, they should choose to focus on one or more of the additional dimensions to craft a winning marketing strategy.

Building Relevance requires upholding and activating Warmth and Rootedness – key traits among Hispanic consumers. Brands should also acknowledge and celebrate Hispanic patriotic pride, and be mindful to connect with the Hispanic sense of destiny and their Optimism.

Brand case studies show that winners succeed at aligning brand positioning with the cultural traits of Hispanic consumers. When brands take this approach, shoppers reward them by supporting or purchasing their product.

Engaging with Hispanic communities and groups at all levels shows a commitment to Values and builds Trust.

An example of this is seen in Nike’s support of national Hispanic organizations, as the company engaged through connections to specific Hispanic communities in key areas when it partnered with U.S. Sports Camps. The collaboration led to daylong opportunities for Los Angeles area kids to experience baseball.

Brands also prosper when they effectively build Memories and Fit. This entails that a given brand tie their brand value proposition to important Hispanic values of hospitality and intergenerational respect. Further, they should leverage brand strengths that best meet the fluid needs of time starved bicultural families. This means also enticing the Hispanic traits of Resilience and Adventurous mindset.

To that point, McDonald’s chose to honor a trailblazing Latino international icon with their “J Balvin special combo meal.” By placing this item on the menu and recognizing this Latino artist, McDonald’s taps into the exceptional and adventurous Hispanic pallet and mindset.

In conclusion, I would say that in order to build brand loyalty – whether it be with Hispanic shoppers or another segment – brands must go beyond promoting superficial insights. Simply put, that’s just not enough. Brands need to do the necessary research in order to determine ‘the why’. They must grasp how their values and brand positioning truly connects with Hispanic cultural values. This is imperative.

About Collage Group

Collage Group is the leading source of cultural intelligence about diverse consumers to more than 250 of America’s iconic brands across 15 industries. For more than 10 years, Collage Group has developed consumer insights across race and ethnicity, generation, sexual identity, gender and parent-child relationships with a focus on high-growth consumer segments. Members of the Collage Group Cultural Intelligence Programs –Multicultural, Generations, LGBTQ+ & Gender and Parents & Kids–have access to 10+ years of consumer insights and 300+ studies with new data unveiled weekly. Learn more about why America’s iconic brands turn to Collage Group for diverse consumer insights and best practices.

About CultureRate

With CultureRate:Ad and Brand, Collage Group provides competitive rankings of all top brands and ads in every major category. The CultureRate database is the largest of its kind available, growing annually by over 200,000 responses or 30 million unique datapoints. Through a deep oversample of diverse Americans, brand leaders can access rich insight into how consumers process brands and ads across race and ethnicity, generation, sexual orientation and gender. ​Brand leaders apply the findings from CultureRate:Ad and CultureRate:Brand to build cultural fluency, the capability to drive total market growth from inclusive, diverse-led marketing.

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Other Recent Hispanic Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Understanding Hispanic American Acculturation

,
Understanding Hispanic American Acculturation
The Hispanic population in the U.S. is large and growing. Understanding the diversity within the segment as well as their priorities is vital for brands and marketers to grow right alongside this critical American consumer segment.

September 13, 2022
Sudipti Kumar – Associate Director

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

As of the 2020 Census, there were 62 million Americans who identified as Hispanic. This segment accounts for over 50% of total population growth in the U.S. and it’s native-born Hispanic Americans– not new immigrants to the country–  who are driving virtually all of that growth.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Understanding Hispanic Americans  presentation.

Importantly, the segment is comprised of three sub-groups across the spectrum of acculturation: acculturatedbicultural, and unacculturated.

Those sub-groups are based on Collage’s own acculturation model designed to better understand the Hispanic segment through cultural preferences. Our model mostly focuses on language usage (Spanish, English, or both) but also includes an identity component. And, when we look at the population of Hispanic Americans by acculturation, we see that the largest and fastest growing group is Bicultural Hispanic Americans. In addition to proportional size, the Bicultural Hispanic segment is also the youngest, ensuring future growth (and importance to your messaging) too.

But, to better understand Hispanic American consumers, you need to go beyond demographic size and acculturation. Our recent research into Hispanic identity and behavior offers a set of key findings for brands and marketers when it comes to understanding and engaging with Hispanic Americans.

    1. Hispanic Americans prefer the terms Hispanic and Latino/Latina as their identifiers. There are also some terms the segment clearly does not prefer.
    2. Ethnicity and country of origin are key parts of Hispanic Americans’  identity and supersede other characteristics, like gender or life stage.
    3. Hispanic Americans are a uniquely positive segment, displaying optimism even when times are tough.
    4. Hispanic Americans are social media super users. The segment’s overall youth and forward-thinking nature have a big part to play in this.
    5. Hispanic Americans want to preserve their culture while living in America, particularly through cooking and enjoying traditional meals.

Keep reading to learn more about each of the key findings above  and download the attached document for a selection of our summary findings.

 

Key Finding #1: Hispanic Americans prefer the terms Hispanic and Latino/Latina as their identifiers. There are also some terms the segment clearly does not prefer.

When it comes to identifying terms, Hispanic Americans clearly have a preference. “Hispanic” and “Latino/Latina” top the list overall for the segment, with “Hispanic American” winning overall especially with Mexican Americans. South Americans and Central Americans are more inclined to use the label Latino/Latina.

For Puerto Ricans and Cuban Americans, their preference for using country of origin as their prime identifier really shows up, as well.

Despite the recent popularity of the term “Latinx” to denote inclusivity, you can see that it clearly does not resonate with many Hispanic Americans;  It’s the lowest on the list, alongside “Latine” and “Person of Color.”

Action Step: Use either the terms Hispanic or Latino/Latina when you want to refer to Hispanic Americans in general.

If your target is Latin Americans living in the US, defer to Latino/Latina. And keep in mind that despite broad appeal, these terms are not technically synonymous. Hispanic refers to people from Spanish-speaking countries, while Latino/Latina refers to the geography of Latin America.

Key Finding #2: Ethnicity and country of origin are key parts of Hispanic Americans’ identity and supersede other characteristics, like gender or life stage.

In a recent survey, we asked Hispanic Americans which three aspects of their identity they would use to describe themselves. Hispanic/Latino heritage (i.e. ethnicity) tops the list at 63%. And when we look at this by Acculturation, we see that the percentage for Hispanic/Latino heritage jumps to 79% for the Unacculturated segment and 68% for the Bicultural Hispanic Americans.

What’s more, country of origin also moves up higher for Unacculturated Hispanic Americans with 46% of them noting this as a key part of who they are. This is likely due to the sub-segment’s stronger affiliation with the U.S. rather than another country. Acculturated Hispanic Americans lean into their personality and race more than other Hispanic Americans. But despite those differences, Hispanic/Latino heritage is still in the top three for the Acculturated segment too.

Action Step: Craft marketing messaging that celebrates the diversity of the segment.

Even when messaging is narrowly targeted to a specific Hispanic sub-segment, the crossover appeal of taking the time to understand the nuances of identity will be seen and valued across the entire segment.

Key Finding #3: Hispanic Americans are a uniquely positive segment, displaying optimism even when times are tough.

Collage Group’s Group Trait work is based on 75 focused, nuanced, and culturally specific agreement scale questions in a targeted survey. The data is analyzed based on rank, differentiation and overall agreement for a target consumer group versus others.

For Hispanic Americans, four Group Traits popped: Culture-Focused, Positivity, Warmth, and Engaged.

Let’s look at one of the key group traits for the segment: Positivity. Here you can see how Hispanic Americans uniquely resonate with the cultural statements “Resilient”, “Optimistic”, and “Destined.” The combination of these three statements helps us understand the positive mindset of Hispanic Americans. Even though the segment has experienced many hardships while immigrating to and living in this country they look excitedly into the future.

Action Step: Offer optimism in these uncertain times by communicating uplifting themes that speak to resilience and overcoming adversity.

That doesn’t mean you should sugar-coat hard realities but do communicate honest messages with confidence and hopefulness.

Key Finding #4: Hispanic Americans are social media super users. The segment’s overall youth and forward-thinking nature have a big part to play in this.

Hispanic Americans are more likely to post on social media daily, visit social media to find communities where they belong and use popular newer social media platforms. In almost every arena, Hispanic Americans are more likely to post on social media and use those platforms for recommendations across categories like restaurants, fitness and exercise, and fashion.

The segment is also younger than any other racial or ethnic groups in America and that certainly plays a role in their collective interest in social media., But their penchant for digital communication and content consumption is also tied to the segment’s unique focus on being forward-thinking and open to new types of technology sooner than others.

Action Step: Speak up and harness word of mouth marketing through social media.​

Hispanic Americans are highly connected through technology and value the opinions of those in their network.

Key Finding #5: Hispanic Americans want to preserve their culture while living in America, particularly through cooking and enjoying traditional meals.

Another group trait that is highly relevant for Hispanic Americans is their Culture-Focus. That means they care a lot about maintaining their heritage even while living in the U.S. There are so many ways to preserve traditions, but cooking and enjoying traditional meals together may be one of the biggest. In fact, 9 in 10 Unacculturated and Bicultural Hispanic Americans believe that cooking meals from their culture is an important way to maintain traditions, and its still pretty high for Acculturated Hispanic Americans too.

Action Step: Highlight Hispanic Americans cooking and sharing traditional meals with their family.

This also promotes their family focus alongside their commitment to maintaining their culture.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Other Recent Hispanic Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Sudipti Kumar
Associate Director

Sudipti is an Associate Director on Collage Group’s Product and Content team. She is a graduate from NYU’s Stern School of Business where she studied finance and marketing, and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs where she received her Masters in Public Administration. In her spare time, Sudipti enjoys reading, cooking, and learning to crochet.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Women’s Passion Points
Learn how American Women engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 9, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Multicultural Women like cooking and baking the most

Women are less likely than Men to love cooking. Multicultural Women lean into cooking more than Non-Hispanic White Women and are the most into baking.

Context:

For Multicultural Women, cooking and baking are opportunities to connect with their heritage. It can be challenging to find baked goods they grew up eating, so baking them instead is a helpful option.

Action Step:

Provide examples of how your brand can help Multicultural Women connect with their cultural heritage through food.

Key Finding #2: Multicultural Women love to travel to connect with their heritage and be immersed in the culture

Multicultural Women are more likely to want to travel to places tied to their family’s heritage. When they do travel, they want to be immersed in the local culture through experiencing the food and living like a local.

Context:

Hispanic and Asian Americans are culture-focused and traveling to places that mean something to them culturally is one way they show their love of their culture. Asian Women are most likely to want to live like a local while traveling because of their inquisitive group trait, which shows up in their desire to learn about other places.

Action Step:

When showcasing travel as part of an overall marketing strategy, highlight what it means to travel like a local with cultural immersion at the center of the experience. Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.

Key Finding #3: Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise

Multicultural Women are passionate about fitness and exercise and will work out regardless of needing to do it to lose weight or be healthy. Walking is the most popular way to work out.

Context:

Multicultural Women’s love of fitness and exercise is part of a larger trend of being more health and fitness conscious. This shows up across category.

Action Step:

Showcase how your brand can help Multicultural Women reach their fitness goals. Walking is a very popular form of exercise, so highlight walking for its many benefits.

Key Finding #4: Women gamers prefer playing on their own

Women are more likely to play video games by themselves and on their mobile phones.

Context:

Women routinely experience bias and harassment online and that includes online gaming. As a result, many Women are choosing games that allow them to play alone and avoid toxic online interactions. Mobile games are often a more solo experience which may be way they lean into this channel for gaming more. However, Women are still active leaders in gaming and should be celebrated as such.

Action Step:

Showcase Women as leaders in the gaming industry and promote greater positivity for Women who enjoy gaming. It is also helpful to highlight solo games over more collaborative ones when engaging with Women in the gaming space.

Key Finding #5: Women are eco-conscious when it comes to fashion

Women, particularly those who are younger, love thrift shopping.

Context:

Women are conscientious shoppers. They care about the future of the world and thrift shopping is a sustainable, thoughtful, and economical way to shop.

Action Step:

Highlight your brand’s sustainable features and how your brand supports Women in being conscientious eco-friendly fashionistas.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Understand and Embrace Asian Consumer Passion Points

Understand and Embrace Asian Consumer Passion Points
Learn how Asian American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, travel, sports and fitness, fashion, games, and home and garden.

September 1, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Asian Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Asian Americans Are Passionate about Cooking and Cook Meals to Maintain Cultural Traditions

Asian Americans rely on cooking and baking to maintain their cultural traditions.

Context:

Cooking traditional recipes connects Asian Americans with their cultural backgrounds. Food is a central part of their community and the places they are from, and they want to honor that in the kitchen.

Action Step:

    • In advertising, highlight Asian Americans love for traditional meals and cooking either subtly or overtly.
    • Offer examples of how your brand can help Asian Americans keep their love for traditional meals alive.

Key Finding #2: Asian Travelers Enjoy Overseas Adventures

Asian Americans love to travel internationally both to connect with their heritage and to have new cultural experiences.

Context:

Two thirds of Asian Americans are foreign born, and the other third are very likely to be second generation Americans. Their relatively recent immigration stories mean they are likely to still have personal and emotional connections with their country of origin. Traveling internationally helps them to connect with their heritage.

Asian Americans are also inquisitive, and they like to travel to experience new foods and different cultures than their own.

Action Step:

    • Engage with Asian American travelers by emphasizing the personal connections they have across global locations.
    • Position travel as a tool to help people connect with their heritage and traditions.
    • Stimulate Asian American’s curiosity for different cultures and lifestyles by inspiring them to create new memories abroad.

Key Finding #3: Asian Americans Share a Unique Passion for Fitness and Exercise

Asian Americans lead the multicultural segment in having a passion for fitness and exercise, especially walking and doing yoga. They over-index on the use of multiple types of gyms and gym equipment.

Context:

Asian Americans consistently prioritize their health and fitness because they are health focused. They choose a variety of ways to be active but similar to most Americans, walking wins. That’s probably because it’s pretty easy to do!

Action Step:

    • Help Asian Americans understand how your brand can be a part of their healthy lifestyle.

Key Finding #4: Younger Asian Americans Express Themselves Through Fashion

Younger Asian Americans see fashion as a way to express their individuality.

Context:

Asian Americans aren’t afraid to make fashion choices that are bold and unique. They are pioneers in streetwear culture because of the ways they can express themselves through their clothing and accessories. Streetwear also means comfortable clothing, something else that Asian Americans prefer in their fashion!

Action Step:

    • Show how your brand can make Asian Americans feel comfortable while still staying true to themselves and expressing who they are.

Key Finding #5: Asian Americans are Analytical Gamers

Asian Americans share an interest in analog and digital strategic thinking games.

Context:

Asian Americans are analytical and like to think about their options before making decisions. Games that require thinking before making a final decision (e.g., word games or crossword puzzles, chess) provide an example of their analytical mindset.

Action Step:

    • Capture the attention of Asian Americans by focusing on strategic thinking games or highlighting them playing these types of games in your advertising.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Other Recent Asian Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points

Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points
Learn how LGBTQ+ American consumers engage with Passion Points, including food, sports and fitness, travel, fashion, games, and home and garden.

August 22, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Passion Points are the activities that get people excited. They are the “things” Americans prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. In other words, Passion Points are concrete expressions of culture.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
LGBTQ+ Consumer Passion Points  presentation.

Collage Group’s coverage of Passion Points includes in-depth analysis across eight key areas of American consumers’ lives. This is the stuff Americans get fired up about and the places in which they invest their time and money. So, it’s an effective place for brands to both extend reach and deepen connection with America’s multicultural consumers. These activations can vary, from authentic creative and brand positioning to partnerships and sponsorships. In all cases, Passion Points provide critical insights for understanding which activations will be most successful.

Key Finding #1: Food Is for Socializing

LGBTQ+ Americans love to share their food experience (IRL and online) with other people.

Context:

LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely to value being hospitable and congenial with others. They’re also more likely to “consider someone ‘family’ if we are really close, even if we’re not related.” So, sharing experiences with others is a central part of their daily lives.

The LGBTQ+ segment also skews young, so social media and digital communications are second nature. That extends to using those mediums to consume and share pictures, videos, and information about food and meals.

Action Step:

    • Celebrate meals. When representing LGBTQ+ Americans and their food experiences, remember to highlight the social aspects of making food and eating together.
    • Feed LGBTQ+ Americans’ feeds with digital food content. Recipes, inspiration, influencers, and food events are all of interest for these “foodies.”

Key Finding #2: LGBTQ+ Travelers Seek Adventure

LGBTQ+ Americans of all ages and younger non-LGBTQ+ Americans enjoy getting out of their comfort zone when they travel.

Context:

While finding travel locations welcoming of LGBTQ+ travelers is important, LGBTQ+ Americans also love to explore new cultures and enjoy new experiences. They’re unique Group Trait of Worldly highlights their penchant to be open-minded, cosmopolitan and experiential.

Action Step:

    • Emphasize new and the exciting travel opportunities for LGBTQ+ Americans. The world is big and interesting; Help them discover it.

Key Finding #3: Video Game Fandom Provides Community for the LGBTQ+ Segment

Younger LGBTQ+ Americans uniquely love video games and see them as a vehicle for self-expression and socializing.

Context: LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely than others to value being unique and creative. The segment also prioritizes happiness and fun in their lives. It’s no doubt, then, why LGBTQ+ consumers would flock to video games as a way of enjoying life and creative storytelling. All the better to experience it with friends. Action Step:
    • Emphasize the social dynamic of video games and celebrate the expressive possibility of joining others in playing your favorite game.

Key Finding #4: LGBTQ+ People Are Social Sports Fans

LGBTQ+ Americans may be less interested in following sports, in general, but they are more likely than others to host sports-viewing parties and go to sports bars to watch games with other people.

Context:

As a segment, LGBTQ+ Americans value being hospitable and congenial higher than other Americans. They also are more likely to say they consider someone “family” if they’re close, but not actually related.

Connecting with others is a deep priority for this segment and sports and fitness is a key way many LGBTQ+ Americans choose to build relationships with others.

Action Step:

    • Emphasize the social aspects of fandom when engaging LGBTQ+ Americans. It’s not so much about the teams or the players, it’s about the fans.

Key Finding #5: LGBTQ+ Americans Use Style to Uniquely Express Themselves

Fashion is a stand-out Passion Point for LGBTQ+ Americans. They see themselves as fashionable and enjoy self-expression and bold choices in their style.

Context:

For many LGBTQ+ Americans, celebrating their uniqueness is not only fun, but also an essential element of discovering themselves. Fashion provides a creative, expressive, and individual outlet for celebrating their own identities externally.

And given how challenging it can be to come out when society isn’t always welcoming, the desire to embrace style and fashion towards self-identity cuts across age and generation.

Action Step:

    • Lean into fashion with LGBTQ+ consumers and don’t be afraid to push some boundaries and innovate. Remember: Style is a tool of self-expression, so use it as a communication tool to this fashion-forward segment.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Other Recent Multicultural Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Gen Z Passion Points

,
Gen Z Passion Points

What matters most to Gen Z consumers? Collage Group’s latest Generational Passion Points study includes key insights into Gen Z consumers to enhance brand engagement and activation.

August 8, 2022
Natalie Griffith – Director, Product & Content

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life of deep interest to consumers. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. And, they are concrete expressions of culture.

Fill out the form to download the attached presentation for key insights and applications.

Collage Group’s Passion Point research offers deep insight into 8 different Passion Points we know are most important to American consumers. This work offers brands and marketers important tools to engage and win diverse consumer segments.

To get you started with our Passion Points research, read on for sample topline findings on Gen Z consumers, as compared to other generational segments.​​

Travel

The majority of Gen Z is already saying they have a strong urge to travel the world–they are close behind Millennials in this passion. And this sense of urgency is consistent across Gen Z cohorts. With the wealth of travel content online, they have had a greater exposure to all the world has to offer at such a young age than any generation before them. And with all that content, they have a had a lifetime to develop FOMO, or fear or missing out, on seeing the world, and travel influencers sure make it look exciting.

Overwhelmingly, 55% of Gen Z agrees they would rather travel internationally. Younger Gen Z, ages 13 to 17, is even more so interested in traveling abroad. This is a great contrast compared to older generations, as it speaks to this generation’s greater ingroup diversity and their acceptance of and interest in experiencing other cultures.

Gen Z is strongly driven by a desire for adventure. When forced to choose, they would rather be doing exciting things than relaxing on vacation. Younger Gen Z comes out on top with 67% preferring excitement. Fun is the priority, a common theme for this generation.

Cooking & Dining Out

Brands must be careful not to overestimate Gen Z’s identification with being a “foodie,” meaning someone who takes enjoyment in meals and trying new foods. While Millennials are known for this, Gen Z is not quite there. The younger group tends to be less adventurous, as it’s important to remember that they are mostly still living at home with their parents, and likely have lacked the freedom to go out and expand their palate. Older Gen Z consumers, however, are now young adults and are more likely to try new foods.

About half of Gen Z and Millennials like to source their recipes from food influencers or chefs. Our data shows that 49% of gen Z saying they follow food influencers, chefs, and other people to learn new recipes. Often what these viral recipes have in common is that they put an unexpected twist on known ingredients, and that they’re easy and accessible.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Other Recent Gen Z Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Natalie Griffith
Director, Product & Content

Natalie has over 10 years of experience in consumer insights and brand strategy, including 3+ years as lead researcher in Gartner Iconoculture’s Gen Z practice. Natalie has managed research projects across industries, including extensive work in financial services, media, technology, and food and beverage. Natalie holds a B.S. in Psychology from Tulane University.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

In Wake of Higher Prices, Grocery Shoppers Buy Cheaper Brands, Make Fewer Purchases

, , , , , , ,
In Wake of Higher Prices, Grocery Shoppers Buy Cheaper Brands, Make Fewer Purchases

As prices for everyday items continue to soar, a number of Americans find themselves priced out of buying certain products, and others are able to afford but refuse to pay the steeper costs.

August 1, 2022
Quintin Simmons – Public Relations & Communications Manager

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

When it comes to grocery shopping the choice to not buy isn’t a realistic option. Inflation has taken a noticeable toll on the cost of goods of all kinds, from home purchases to vehicle buys. The grocery store is no exception.

Fill out the form for more details in an excerpt of our Category Essential on Food.

To contend with higher grocery bills, a segment of shoppers have changed their shopping habits. Overall, most shoppers reported that they have decided to select cheaper brands, or they have opted to purchase fewer items.

Across racial and ethnicity lines, the reaction to grocery price hikes has been largely similar. Hispanic, Black, and Asian American consumers were more likely to report changing where they shop. These three groups also said they have stopped or have reduced making bulk food purchases.

All three segments – plus White American shoppers – said that affordability is indeed a factor when they decide which foods to buy. Of the White Americans polled, 78% answered that they often or always make a special effort to buy foods that are affordable. Black shoppers also see affordability as an important factor, as 73% responded in kind. Close behind them were Asians at 72%. 

Americans Food Choices

When asked what matters most when choosing a store for grocery shopping, 57% of all races responded, “low prices.” Moreover, collectively 42% of Hispanic, Black, Asians, and Whites said they recently decided to purchase cheaper items or generic brands due to the higher grocery costs. Some have bought less groceries and a portion have decided to shop for food elsewhere.

As prices and food bills continue to mount, buyers of all backgrounds have taken notice, and many are making adjustments.

Fill out the form below to learn more about how you can access the full report.

LinkedIn
Twitter
Facebook
Email

Other Recent Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Quintin Simmons

Quintin Simmons
Public Relations & Communications Manager

Quintin Simmons is Public Relations & Communications manager at Collage Group. He has over two decades of journalism and communications experience, having written and edited for a variety of publications, and servicing as media rep for a number of national outlets. Quintin, a communications and media relations expert, is always looking to connect and engage with writers and reporters.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

How Women Want Brands to Get Involved in Women’s History Month

How Women Want Brands to Get Involved in Women’s History Month
How do women celebrate Women’s History Month? And what are their expectations from brands during the month of March? Read on for insights curated from our 2021 Holidays and Occasions research.
 

Women’s History has been celebrated in March nationwide since 1982, when the government designated the week of March 7th as Women’s History Week. The occasion expanded to Women’s History Month beginning in 1987.

Today, about four in ten Americans – women and men – celebrate Women’s History Month in some way. More than half of younger women ages 18-40 celebrate the occasion, as do more than 60 percent of multicultural women.

4 in 10 Americans celebrate Women's History Month

The most common way women mark Women’s History Month is to support women-owned businesses. Overall, about a quarter of all women do this, with multicultural women even more likely to do so. Education, both about women’s history and the challenges facing American women today, is also a common way many celebrate the month. It’s also important to note that multicultural women are significantly more likely to participate in all the methods of celebration we asked about than White women. The sole exception to that trend is donating money to relevant non-profits.

Multicultural women celebrate Women's History Month

In 2021, the food delivery app DoorDash celebrated Women’s History Month by leveraging women’s interest in supporting their peers’ businesses. They created a “Made by Women” section of the app to allow users to browse women-owned businesses all in one place. Plus, for each order from these restaurants that month, DoorDash donated $1 in support of women culinary entrepreneurs. This campaign allowed DoorDash to both support women-owned restaurants directly and provide support to the non-profit sector.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to diverse consumer insights in our cultural intelligence platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Friendsgiving 2021: How Should My Brand Celebrate?

Friendsgiving 2021: How Should My Brand Celebrate?

It’s not too late to activate! With over 30% of Americans (and 40% of Gen Z and Millennials) celebrating “Friendsgiving,” brands will want to make their mark on this growing tradition. Keep reading to learn what consumers expect from brands like yours this Friendsgiving.

“Friendsgiving” is a holiday tradition adjacent to Thanksgiving. It’s an opportunity for friends to gather with friends in addition to, or instead of, with family. While Friendsgiving may sound like the latest fad or a “cutesy” holiday, it’s a legitimate way younger generations celebrate—and it’s likely to stick around.

Read on for key facts about the holiday, insights on how younger American consumers celebrate the Thanksgiving season, and ideas for how your brand can get involved.

What is ​Friendsgiving?

Friendsgiving is an informal bonus holiday that started gaining traction in 2013. The origin is unclear, but the term caught on via social media and it’s surged in popularity with younger Americans in recent years. Nowadays, Friendsgiving is a seasonal staple with about four in ten Gen Z and Millennials celebrating.

Holiday Stress Chart

Friendsgiving celebrations often take place sometime before Thanksgiving, as a precursor to the big day. But for many young adults who live far away from home and family, Friendsgiving acts as a substitute to the more formal family feast. It’s also a reflection of shifting family dynamics. Young adults today are delaying marriage and parenthood at greater rates than previous generations. This factors into their emphasis on friends, neighbors, and coworkers as a “chosen” family.

Moreover, almost half of Gen Z and Millennials cite amily as a source of stress around holidays. It’s no wonder, then, that many turn to their friends for comfort and joy.

Friendsgiving Celebrations

Since Friendsgiving is such a new way to celebrate Thanksgiving, it isn’t confined to the well-established traditions of Turkey Day. Rather, it’s open to interpretation—which may be just what individualistic younger generations find appealing about it. Many Friendsgiving celebrants incorporate a mix of classic Thanksgiving elements and personal flair. This means that brands have ample room to play in connecting with younger generations for Friendsgiving.

One way that Gen Z and Millennials are evolving Thanksgiving-season celebrations is by including non-traditional foods. Two-thirds of younger Americans do this, likely driven by the generations’ inherent diversity as well as their desire for novelty. Friendsgiving, free of socially imposed “rules,” offers the perfect opportunity to try out new and exciting flavors, experiment with recipes, or to share one’s culture through food.

Graph illustrating groups that have more than Thanksgiving dishes

Brand Activation

Two brands that have developed an excellent Friendsgiving campaign that appeals to Gen Z and Millennials are Amazon and S.Pellegrino. These brands partnered together in 2020 to create a virtual, shoppable “Guide to Friendsgiving.” The online storefront features videos and recipes by Kristen Kish, an LGBTQ+ Korean-American culinary expert and Top Chef championIn this pandemic-friendly activation, Kish connects with her friends via video chat to recreate their favorite recipes with a twist. From the site, shoppers can download recipes and purchase ingredients to be delivered by Amazon Fresh.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Diwali 2021: What Should My Brand Do?

Diwali 2021: What Should My Brand Do?

It’s not too late to activate! With two thirds of Indian Americans celebrating Diwali, brands will want to make their mark on this important holiday. Keep reading to learn what Asian consumers expect from brands like yours on this festival of lights.

Diwali is one of the major festivals celebrated among Hindus, Jains, Sikhs, and many Buddhists. The holiday lasts five days, and it coincides with the Hindu New Year according to their lunisolar calendar. Though it falls on November 4 this year, Diwali has some similarities to other winter and New Year’s celebrations, and comes with distinct cultural traditions.

Read on for key facts about the holiday, insights on how Asian American consumers celebrate, and ideas for how your brand can get involved.

What is Diwali?

Diwali honors the conclusion of the Ramayana, a key Hindu text and one of two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India. It celebrates the triumphant return of Prince Rama after a 14-year exile, the rescue of his wife Sita, and his coronation as king. Rejoicing in Rama’s victories, Diwali celebrants honor light itself amidst the darkness of coming winter.  And for many Asian Americans, Diwali is an explicitly religious holiday, with the Goddess Lakshmi – symbolizing wealth and purity – a key focus.

Traditions of Diwali​

    • Candles and firecrackers are popular in Diwali celebrations, with diya oil lamps one of the more traditional means of proving light in the darkness
    • Rangoli is an art form common in Diwali preparations, where colored sand, flower petals, rocks, and powdered stone are arranged in colorful, patterned designs on a flat surface
    • Sweet foods are a traditional component of Diwali celebrations, with many preparing malpua pancakes, laddu balls, and other fare to eat and share
    • Puja is a worship ritual common among Hindus, Buddhists, and Jains. On Diwali, offerings of light, flowers, sustenance, or song accompany these rituals, largely directed towards the Goddess Lakshmi

Among Indian Americans, having special food and drink is the most common way to celebrate Diwali. Eating and gifting sweets is therefore a key component of American Diwali, but many other customs – including fireworks, clothing, decorations, and religious ceremonies – are also popular.

Key Consumer Insights

According to Collage Group’s 2021 Holidays and Occasions study, 13% of the Asian American population celebrates Diwali, with 67% of Indian Americans making up the bulk of celebrants. Diwali therefore has a niche, but dedicated market.

Which means many brands may be wondering if they have permission to play.

Among Indian Americans, brands largely have a green light to focus on education. Most Indian Americans say brands should use their Diwali activations to explain what the holiday is and why it’s important, given that half of Americans – and 42% of Asian Americans – are not familiar with the festival at all. And Many Indian Americans also support brands sharing stories of people observing the holiday, as well as showing others what they can do to help celebrate.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px