Posts

How Women Want Brands to Get Involved in Women’s History Month

How Women Want Brands to Get Involved in Women’s History Month
How do women celebrate Women’s History Month? And what are their expectations from brands during the month of March? Read on for insights curated from our 2021 Holidays and Occasions research.
 

Women’s History has been celebrated in March nationwide since 1982, when the government designated the week of March 7th as Women’s History Week. The occasion expanded to Women’s History Month beginning in 1987.

Today, about four in ten Americans – women and men – celebrate Women’s History Month in some way. More than half of younger women ages 18-40 celebrate the occasion, as do more than 60 percent of multicultural women.

4 in 10 Americans celebrate Women's History Month

The most common way women mark Women’s History Month is to support women-owned businesses. Overall, about a quarter of all women do this, with multicultural women even more likely to do so. Education, both about women’s history and the challenges facing American women today, is also a common way many celebrate the month. It’s also important to note that multicultural women are significantly more likely to participate in all the methods of celebration we asked about than White women. The sole exception to that trend is donating money to relevant non-profits.

Multicultural women celebrate Women's History Month

In 2021, the food delivery app DoorDash celebrated Women’s History Month by leveraging women’s interest in supporting their peers’ businesses. They created a “Made by Women” section of the app to allow users to browse women-owned businesses all in one place. Plus, for each order from these restaurants that month, DoorDash donated $1 in support of women culinary entrepreneurs. This campaign allowed DoorDash to both support women-owned restaurants directly and provide support to the non-profit sector.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to diverse consumer insights in our cultural intelligence platform.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Friendsgiving 2021: How Should My Brand Celebrate?

Friendsgiving 2021: How Should My Brand Celebrate?

It’s not too late to activate! With over 30% of Americans (and 40% of Gen Z and Millennials) celebrating “Friendsgiving,” brands will want to make their mark on this growing tradition. Keep reading to learn what consumers expect from brands like yours this Friendsgiving.

“Friendsgiving” is a holiday tradition adjacent to Thanksgiving. It’s an opportunity for friends to gather with friends in addition to, or instead of, with family. While Friendsgiving may sound like the latest fad or a “cutesy” holiday, it’s a legitimate way younger generations celebrate—and it’s likely to stick around.

Read on for key facts about the holiday, insights on how younger American consumers celebrate the Thanksgiving season, and ideas for how your brand can get involved.

What is ​Friendsgiving?

Friendsgiving is an informal bonus holiday that started gaining traction in 2013. The origin is unclear, but the term caught on via social media and it’s surged in popularity with younger Americans in recent years. Nowadays, Friendsgiving is a seasonal staple with about four in ten Gen Z and Millennials celebrating.

Holiday Stress Chart

Friendsgiving celebrations often take place sometime before Thanksgiving, as a precursor to the big day. But for many young adults who live far away from home and family, Friendsgiving acts as a substitute to the more formal family feast. It’s also a reflection of shifting family dynamics. Young adults today are delaying marriage and parenthood at greater rates than previous generations. This factors into their emphasis on friends, neighbors, and coworkers as a “chosen” family.

Moreover, almost half of Gen Z and Millennials cite amily as a source of stress around holidays. It’s no wonder, then, that many turn to their friends for comfort and joy.

Friendsgiving Celebrations

Since Friendsgiving is such a new way to celebrate Thanksgiving, it isn’t confined to the well-established traditions of Turkey Day. Rather, it’s open to interpretation—which may be just what individualistic younger generations find appealing about it. Many Friendsgiving celebrants incorporate a mix of classic Thanksgiving elements and personal flair. This means that brands have ample room to play in connecting with younger generations for Friendsgiving.

One way that Gen Z and Millennials are evolving Thanksgiving-season celebrations is by including non-traditional foods. Two-thirds of younger Americans do this, likely driven by the generations’ inherent diversity as well as their desire for novelty. Friendsgiving, free of socially imposed “rules,” offers the perfect opportunity to try out new and exciting flavors, experiment with recipes, or to share one’s culture through food.

Graph illustrating groups that have more than Thanksgiving dishes

Brand Activation

Two brands that have developed an excellent Friendsgiving campaign that appeals to Gen Z and Millennials are Amazon and S.Pellegrino. These brands partnered together in 2020 to create a virtual, shoppable “Guide to Friendsgiving.” The online storefront features videos and recipes by Kristen Kish, an LGBTQ+ Korean-American culinary expert and Top Chef championIn this pandemic-friendly activation, Kish connects with her friends via video chat to recreate their favorite recipes with a twist. From the site, shoppers can download recipes and purchase ingredients to be delivered by Amazon Fresh.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Diwali 2021: What Should My Brand Do?

Diwali 2021: What Should My Brand Do?

It’s not too late to activate! With two thirds of Indian Americans celebrating Diwali, brands will want to make their mark on this important holiday. Keep reading to learn what Asian consumers expect from brands like yours on this festival of lights.

Diwali is one of the major festivals celebrated among Hindus, Jains, Sikhs, and many Buddhists. The holiday lasts five days, and it coincides with the Hindu New Year according to their lunisolar calendar. Though it falls on November 4 this year, Diwali has some similarities to other winter and New Year’s celebrations, and comes with distinct cultural traditions.

Read on for key facts about the holiday, insights on how Asian American consumers celebrate, and ideas for how your brand can get involved.

What is Diwali?

Diwali honors the conclusion of the Ramayana, a key Hindu text and one of two major Sanskrit epics of ancient India. It celebrates the triumphant return of Prince Rama after a 14-year exile, the rescue of his wife Sita, and his coronation as king. Rejoicing in Rama’s victories, Diwali celebrants honor light itself amidst the darkness of coming winter.  And for many Asian Americans, Diwali is an explicitly religious holiday, with the Goddess Lakshmi – symbolizing wealth and purity – a key focus.

Traditions of Diwali​

    • Candles and firecrackers are popular in Diwali celebrations, with diya oil lamps one of the more traditional means of proving light in the darkness
    • Rangoli is an art form common in Diwali preparations, where colored sand, flower petals, rocks, and powdered stone are arranged in colorful, patterned designs on a flat surface
    • Sweet foods are a traditional component of Diwali celebrations, with many preparing malpua pancakes, laddu balls, and other fare to eat and share
    • Puja is a worship ritual common among Hindus, Buddhists, and Jains. On Diwali, offerings of light, flowers, sustenance, or song accompany these rituals, largely directed towards the Goddess Lakshmi

Among Indian Americans, having special food and drink is the most common way to celebrate Diwali. Eating and gifting sweets is therefore a key component of American Diwali, but many other customs – including fireworks, clothing, decorations, and religious ceremonies – are also popular.

Key Consumer Insights

According to Collage Group’s 2021 Holidays and Occasions study, 13% of the Asian American population celebrates Diwali, with 67% of Indian Americans making up the bulk of celebrants. Diwali therefore has a niche, but dedicated market.

Which means many brands may be wondering if they have permission to play.

Among Indian Americans, brands largely have a green light to focus on education. Most Indian Americans say brands should use their Diwali activations to explain what the holiday is and why it’s important, given that half of Americans – and 42% of Asian Americans – are not familiar with the festival at all. And Many Indian Americans also support brands sharing stories of people observing the holiday, as well as showing others what they can do to help celebrate.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Consumer Holidays Trends: Thanksgiving 2021

Consumer Holidays Trends: Thanksgiving 2021

How will Americans prepare for and celebrate Thanksgiving this year?

In a not-so-post-pandemic era, it’s essential for brands to keep an eye on the behaviors and attitudes surrounding special occasions. Insights from Collage Group’s Holidays & Occasions research enables you to communicate with your audience authentically and effectively. Fill out the form below to download a sample of the study. 

The mass majority of Americans celebrate Thanksgiving. In our most recent round of surveys fielded in May 2021, respondents gave us fascinating insights around the following topics: 

• What traditional and non-traditional foods get included in Thanksgiving celebrations

• How certain segments react to stress during the holidays 

• Which segment is most likely to have a “friendsgiving”

Collage Group helps marketers and insights leaders connect around this occasion by providing insights that clarify the similarities and differences in how American consumers across diverse segments prepare for and experience Thanksgiving. These insights allow for more efficient and effective activations that capture greater mind and market share.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Case Study By Industry | Processed & Packaged Goods

Case Study By Industry | Processed & Packaged Goods

Fostering Empathy for Diverse Consumers Across Brand Teams

CHALLENGE

To realize its mission of bringing “Flavor to All”, an international Processed & Packaged Goods Company recognized the need for a strong foundational understanding of diverse consumers as an imperative for building authentic connection across the total market.

The company had a strong starting point: a diverse workforce, inclusive mission, and credible consumer insights partners (including Collage Group) that provide data across culture.

However, the Consumer Insights team recognized that driving authentic connection would take more than unearthing culturally fluent data. They had to go the extra mile, teach the insights, and foster empathy for diverse consumers throughout their brand teams. 

Learn more about Collage Group’s consumer insights in our Category Essentials for Food and fill out the form to download a sample of the research.

SOLUTION

To imbed these deep consumer insights across the company culture, Collage Group designed a partnership solution for the company through our suite of product offerings, which included:

  1. Access to the Multicultural Consumer Research Platform, where they could leverage timely research and content on topics of interest across the company, including diverse consumer digital/social behaviors, attitudes toward holidays and occasions, and more.

  2. Support from Collage Group’s Syndicated Research and SME’s to build a “Multicultural Webinar Series,” with the goal of sharing culturally relevant insights across the organization. The focus was to educate on key consumer segments (Hispanic, Black, Asian, LGBTQ+, etc.). For easy takeaways, each presentation begins and ends with “Five Facts” relevant to the demographic or topic. 
  3.  

RESULT

Collage Group operationalized a virtual, companywide webinar learning series (mid-pandemic), which included eight presentations, reaching hundreds of attendees across the company.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

How Consumers Engage with Cookouts and Barbecues

How Consumers Engage with Cookouts and Barbecues

Learn how Americans across racial and ethnic segments prepare for and experience cookouts and barbecues.

Brands are constantly tapping into the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors surrounding consumer holidays and occasions. This summer, most consumers across segments are looking forward to barbecues and cookouts. In Welcome to the Traegerhood, Traeger Grill reminds us that cookouts and barbecues have the power to create a sense of community–a concept much longed for in the midst of the pandemic. Brands can look to this commercial as an example of relevant, effective storytelling.

The following consumer insights belong to a series of Collage Group reports on holidays and occasions. This targeted research allows for more efficient and effective brand activations that capture greater mind and market share.

1. Multicultural Americans Are More Likely to Have a Family Sauce or Special Recipe for Barbecues and Cookouts

39% of Americans say their family has  a special sauce or recipe for cookouts or barbecues.

Acculturated Hispanics are least likely (36%H) to say their family has a special sauce or recipe for cookouts or barbecues,
compared to Unacculturated (54%) and Bicultural (60%) Hispanics.

2. Millennials Take the Most Active Role in Food Preparation at Barbecues.

The Differences among Generations Are Likely Tied to Life Stage.

3. Food Is the Star of the Show—and Most Important Element—of Most Americans’ Cookouts.

Music Is More Likely to Be a Crucial Component of Cookouts for LGBTQ+ Americans.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Consumer Spotlight: LGBTQ+ and Women Passion Points

Consumer Spotlight: LGBTQ+ & Women Passion Points

Collage Group’s LGBTQ+ & Gender research equips members with a “cultural toolbox” that provides deep insight into consumer segments, enabling brands to authentically engage and communicate with their audience.

One pillar of this cultural research is called Essentials, which gives a 360-degree view of the LGBTQ+ & Women consumer landscape, spread across two different types of content: Cultural Traits and Passion Points. The Cultural Traits are designed to provide you with high level Cultural Attributes and more specific Group Traits to understand critical personality characteristics for a given segment or generational cohort, sexuality, or gender.

The research below is from Passion Points, a study that focuses on the activities that Americans like doing and the interests and enthusiasms they have. If Cultural Traits are the drivers behind decision-making, Passion Points are what Consumers spend their time deciding on. Or as we say, Passion Points are “concrete expressions of culture.”

Movies

Nearly half of the LGBTQ+ segment consider themselves to be a “film buff.” That’s significantly higher than Non—LGBTQ+ by 14 percentage points.

This signifies a deep level of fandom and confidence in their knowledge base about films—focus on films as a serious hobby. This particular attitude may be driven by their passion for representation in storytelling.

When we asked people if they think of themselves as experts or movie buffs, women were significantly less likely to agree. Only one in three women consider themselves movie buffs, while four of ten men agree. This could have something to do with societal pressures on women to be less self-endorsing. They are less likely claim that they’re an expert, but this doesn’t mean that women are less passionate about movies and shows than men are.

Food

Since LGBTQ+ Americans are more likely to enjoy staying connected with celebrity news, they’re also more likely to receive their food inspiration from social media. 

In fact, 58% of LGBTQ+ say they get food inspiration from social media and follow food influencers like chefs or other people for recipes.

One interesting way that women’s interest in food differs from that of men is their interest in seasonal foods and drinks. Two thirds of women say their tastes changes throughout the seasons, significantly more than men. Whether this is looking for soups and hearty stews in the cold winter, or trying a special at a restaurant that features fresh summer vegetables, women are flexible and adventurous in their taste. This means that they’re often looking for new recipes, new foods and drinks to try. 

Keep your brand on the cusp of consumer intel with Collage Group's LGBTQ+ & Gender research. Fill out the form below to start a conversation about the benefits of membership.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Fundamentals of Generational Marketing: Passion Points

Fundamentals of Generational Marketing: Passion Points
Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in.
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on email
Email

They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. They are concrete expressions of culture. This research offers brands and marketers important insights to win over consumers from all generational cohorts.

Learn more in this download from our Engage Gen Z and Millennial Passion Points presentation.

Engage Gen Z and Millennial Passion Points

What matters most to Boomers, Gen X, Millennials and Gen Z?

Our topline results show that consumers generally opt for TV and Movies, Music, and Food. Boomers and Gen Z consumers tend to have more fluctuations in their passions with higher peaks and lower valleys than Gen X and Millennials. Boomers are more likely to say they are interested in religion, while Gen Z over-indexes in music and games. Gen Xers often find themselves between Millennials and Boomers, such as their passion for traveling. 

Millennials, known for their love of new experiences, are significantly more interested in staying active than the older two generations.

Beyond these top-line results, we have much insight as to which generational cohorts over or under-index on various topics such as movies & tv shows, music, food and travel.

Here are four important data points from the study:

1. Movies & TV Shows

On the left, you see the favorite movie genres for the total population. Comedy and Action/Adventure are the overall winners. On the right, though, we see the responses of each generational cohort.

Gen Z and Millennials are more likely to prefer genres like horror (Gen Z), fantasy, and animation, including anime. Gen X and Boomers, however, are more likely to choose a drama, thriller, or science fiction option.

2. Music & Audio

Looking through the chart, you’ll see that the generations have distinct tastes in music genres – at least between older and younger generations. For the total population, Rock is most popular, with 42 percent of consumers saying it is in their top three music genres. But both younger generations under-index on rock music. Especially Gen Z, where only 25 percent say they choose rock. Gen Z and Millennials over-index on liking Hip-Hop and R&B and are more open to K-pop as well.

This is aligned with what we know about younger generations generally – they’re more racially and ethnically diverse, and this is reflected in their diverse music tastes as well.

3. Food

When it comes to food, one big question is whether American consumers consider themselves “foodies,” who prioritize taste and experiential eating, or “health nuts,” who prioritize nutrition and diets. 

Here, we see that more Americans consider themselves “Foodies” than “Health Nuts.”

We also see some interesting generational variation here.

On the left, we see that about half of Americans consider themselves “Foodies,” and that Millennials – at 61 percent – is more likely than all other generations to believe this.  And on the right, we see that less than a third of the total population considers themselves “health nuts.” Gen Z and Gen X consumers hold to that average, but the big differences lie between Millennials and Boomers. 

So far, we’ve seen a lot of trends hold to a younger vs older dichotomy, but when it comes to food-related identity, Millennials really stand out as being food-focused. Boomers are not as focused on considering themselves a foodie or a health nut. While most Americans call themselves “foodies,” Millennial Americans lead the “health nut” trend.

4. Travel

For many people, the main tossup is between domestic versus international travel.

On average at the total population level, consumers are pretty split between the two, but preference for domestic taking a slight lead.

However when we break the data down by generation, we see a pretty clear pattern amongst consumers. 

Younger people have a distinctly stronger desire to travel abroad – especially Gen Z, at 61%, they are significantly more likely than all other generations. Millennials are an even split. Older generations are where we see a stronger preference for domestic travel. Boomers are the most likely generation to prefer traveling within the US over traveling abroad – about three in four. Perhaps driven by a desire to stay closer to home.

Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on email
Email

Other Recent Generational Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Fundamentals of Multicultural Marketing: Passion Points

Fundamentals of Multicultural Marketing: Passion Points

What matters most to American consumers across racial and ethnic segments? Collage Group's latest study covers major Multicultural Passion Points your brand can act on immediately.

What are Passion Points?

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. They are concrete expressions of culture.

Collage’s Passion Point research offers deep insight into 8 Passion Points we know Americans care deeply about. This work offers brands and marketers important tools to win multicultural consumer segments.

To get you started, let’s look at some topline findings about the things that matter most across both segments and the Passion Points themselves.

1. Multicultural Consumers Want More Experiential Movie-watching

When we asked people if they like watching movies in theaters more than at home, and if they prefer “enhanced” movie experiences, like IMAX or 3D, less than half of the total population agreed. But it’s the Non-Hispanic White segment which is driving this low agreement. Multicultural segments were more likely to say they prefer watching movies in theaters, and that they prefer IMAX and 3D movie experiences.

When we double click into acculturation, we see that bicultural and unacculturated Hispanics are the ones really driving the Hispanic desire for theaters and enhanced movie experiences.  Acculturated Hispanic consumers are less likely to enjoy watching movies in theaters (42%H ; Bi: 54% ; Un: 63%H), or having an “enhanced” movie experience (41%H ; Bi: 56% ; Un: 56%).

2. Multicultural Consumers Have Distinct Tastes for Music Genres

Which genres are most popular across multicultural segments?

For the total population, Rock is most popular, with 42 percent of consumers saying it is in their top three music genres. But all three multicultural segments under-index on rock music. Especially the Black segment, where only 11 percent say they choose rock! What do these consumers listen to instead? 

For Black Americans, the answer is R&B – seven in ten Black consumers choose R&B over other genres. Black consumers are also most likely to listen to Hip-Hop, Jazz, Blues, Soul, and Gospel music.

For Asian Americans, the answer is Pop music – half of Asian consumers say they choose Pop over other genres. Asian consumers are also most likely to choose electronic and K-Pop music.

And for Hispanic Americans, the most popular music genre is Latin Pop, including Reggaeton. About a third of Hispanic consumers say they choose this genre over other options.

3. More Americans Consider Themselves “Foodies” Rather than “Health Nuts”

About half of Americans consider themselves “Foodies,” and the Black segment – at 56 percent – is more likely than non-Hispanic White consumers believe this.

We also see that while less than a third of the total population considers themselves “health nuts,” all multicultural segments are more likely than non-Hispanic White consumers to do so.

While only a quarter of White consumers are “health nuts,” over a third of Asian, Black, and Hispanic consumers are. With Unacculturated Hispanic consumers being the most likely, at 48 percent, compared to the other Hispanic Acculturation segments.

And while most Americans call themselves “foodies,” Multicultural Americans lead the “health nut” trend. 

4. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans Prefer to Travel Internationally

When we asked consumers to choose between traveling domestically or internationally, most of the Hispanic and Asian segments chose international travel. As you can see on the chart, only 48 percent – about half – of Hispanic consumers chose domestic travel, and even fewer – 38 percent – of Asian respondents opted for the U.S. option. Within the Hispanic segment, bicultural and unacculturated Hispanic Americans are more likely than their acculturated peers to prefer international travel.

The Black and Non-Hispanic White consumer segments, on the other hand, prefer domestic over international travel.

1. Multicultural Consumers Want More Experiential Movie-watching

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

% agree

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > .95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

2. Multicultural Consumers Have Distinct Tastes for Music Genres

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

Multiselect, Max. 3

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > .95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

3. More Americans Consider Themselves “Foodies” Rather than “Health Nuts”

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

% agree

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

4. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans Prefer to Travel Internationally

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

Forced choice

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px

Case Study By Industry | Food

Case Study By Industry | Food

Finding Growth Opportunities Among a Multicultural Segment

CHALLENGE

A prominent U.S.-based food company had been carefully curating a positioning strategy for a multicultural segment to explicitly match what they were hearing from consumers through their research.

But sales was reporting a different story: competitors were stealing market share.

The challenge: they needed to go beyond the surface to capture what consumers weren’t telling them.

SOLUTION

To get deeper, faster – Collage Group had a head start. By leveraging our existing consumer research database of more than 70 million data points, we quickly moved to address the brand’s specific issues.

1. Our depth of research and best practices in our syndicated database illuminated attitudes and behaviors of the segment, including trends in home cooking.

2. Collage Group’s custom solutions team conducted qualitative interviews in key metro areas and honed in on perceptions of the product in relation to competitors, as well as cooking habits and sources for inspiration. Our in-situation observational approach brought the consumer’s relationship with the category to life and allowed us to explore beyond reported answers.

3. To vet and prioritize findings from the qualitative work, we launched a quantitative survey to ~1,000 multicultural consumers in this segment.

RESULT

While the brand’s positioning worked in theory, we found that it overlooked how key multicultural consumers use the product(s). Going behind the scenes enabled us to explore how this consumer segment actually connects to the brand through a unique lens.

Based on our findings, we delivered:

• A new creative brief leading with a deep understanding of how to execute with cultural fluency top-of-mind, preventing the brand from executing a strategy that generates backlash.

A renewed strategic focus on the right channels to reach this multicultural consumer segment – and the content to highlight in campaigns.

A distribution strategy and pricing schemes to build awareness and loyalty.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of just for you

collage-transparent-white-156px