Tag Archive for: Demographics

Case Study | International Luxury Auto Brand

CHALLENGE

As International Luxury Auto Brand sets out to build its multicultural consumer base to be on par with other luxury auto brands, it is seeking insight into how its brand message resonates. International Luxury Auto Brand called on Collage Group to help it gain a better understanding of what multicultural consumers desire in terms of the luxury auto space. The international automaker aimed to learn how multicultural consumers perceive International Luxury Auto Brand and how to better craft its messaging to connect with multicultural audiences. In turn, Collage led International Luxury Auto Brand on a journey to unlock growth through Cultural Fluency.

SOLUTION

The first step of the journey entailed Collage Group helping International Luxury Auto Brand identify and answer key research objectives. An analysis was performed on the brand values, its history, and messaging. Collage Group experts then evaluated the various ways for International Luxury Auto Brand to show up for specific consumer segments. This process called for determining whether there was a need for more cultural representation within International Luxury Auto Brand’s marketing. Collage Group posed challenging questions, such as “Is the brand not interesting enough?” and “Is the focus on safety connecting?”

Actionable Insights

International Luxury Auto Brand’s journey incorporated Collage Group’s three streams of syndicated intelligence, as well as custom research and consulting. The journey started with assessing International Luxury Auto Brand’s cultural relevance in the market at large via our CultureRate Brand & Testing.

From there, Collage Group’s syndicated consumer and category essentials studies provided a preliminary look at the strongest opportunities for increased relevance, brand favorability, and purchase intent. Among other findings, Collage Group’s research shows that multicultural Americans will reward brands and organizations that support them. In fact, over half of multicultural people are dissatisfied with how they are portrayed in advertising. Armed with this knowledge, Collage Group advised International Luxury Auto Brand to take measures to dig deeper into category-specific nuances. Collage’s custom research team designed a unique A&U study for an acute view of critical needs and preferences of multicultural luxury vehicle prospects, which unveiled the following:

    • 60% of multicultural consumers intend to buy a vehicle in the next two years.
    • Multicultural consumers are more likely to consider auto brands that are:
      • Culturally inclusive
      • Active in their channels and communities
      • Recommended by their peers and loved ones
    • Multicultural consumers want stylish and sustainable high-performing technology in a vehicle that makes them feel seen, unique, and successful.
    • To connect with these consumers, International Luxury Auto Brand must:
      • Disruptively accelerate relevance and visibility
      • Engage and drive with key luxury and workmanship credibility beyond safety
      • Fuel a unique driving experience that upholds identity and celebrates success

Issues to Address

    • International Luxury Auto Brand’s brand values and messaging are not currently resonating with multicultural consumers.
    • There is a historic perception that International Luxury Auto Brand’s vehicles are unstylish and boxy. This viewpoint, while outdated, lingers in consumers’ minds, and creates a barrier to gaining consumers consideration.
    • International Luxury Auto Brand’s historical emphasis on safety appears to have distracted consumers from familiarity with other vehicle features. As a result, the brand has been overlooked as a luxury offering.

RESULTS

Overall, the combination of Collage Group’s syndicated intelligence, custom solutions, and subject matter expertise identified that multicultural luxury consumers are much more likely to plan to make a vehicle purchase in the next two years. Moreover, the journey with International Luxury Auto Brand identified key immediate opportunities to win with Hispanic and Asian luxury intenders.

Collage Group unveiled that International Luxury Auto Brand did not need to re-invent the car to meet multicultural consumer needs. When asked what needed to change for them to consider International Luxury Auto Brand, consumers often pointed to features already offered in existing International Luxury Auto Brand models. As such, Collage Group advised International Luxury Auto Brand to emphasize high-end/stylish design (both interior and exterior), as well as comfort, driving assistance, and in-car entertainment features.

This reframing would elevate perceptions of International Luxury Auto Brand as an exceptional luxury offering among multicultural consumers. Additionally, effort to further promote hybrid and electric models may tap into fuel efficiency and environmental considerations that show up as key preferences across consumer segments.

Multicultural consumers desire authentic cultural representation in marketing efforts. Advertising recall of International Luxury Auto Brand is amongst the lowest of luxury brands and is compounded by their social circles’ own limited experience with International Luxury Auto Brand. While the brand is currently associated with success and wealth, multicultural consumers also perceive typical International Luxury Auto Brand drivers as family-oriented, older, and White. As a result, Collage Group advised International Luxury Auto Brand to consider how advertising can be used to paint International Luxury Auto Brand as a brand that multicultural consumers enjoy to express their personal style, values, and thoughts.

The Collage Group journey with International Luxury Auto Brand continues, as we delve into greater specificity of implications to their name plates.

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Case Study | International Alcoholic Beverage Brand Group

CHALLENGE

The North American marketing and insights team at International Alcoholic Beverage Brand Group, a global alcoholic beverage company with a portfolio of more than 50 premium brands, recognized in 2021 that they needed to significantly rethink their approach to marketing to diverse America. They also recognized that the change from mainstream-focused messaging to a culturally authentic and connected approach would require a strategic shift in mindset, extending not only across the International Alcoholic Beverage Brand organization but also into channel partners.

SOLUTION

International Alcoholic Beverage Brand joined Collage Group’s Multicultural Cultural Intelligence Program to obtain the always-on support, education, assessment and data they needed to launch the strategy to more authentically engage America’s diverse consumers, using the following steps:

1) Assess the Cultural Fluency of key brands to evaluate performance gaps and identify where they needed to build new marketing competencies.

The process began with an assessment of International Alcoholic Beverage Brand brand performance using the Collage CultureRate:Brand measurement process. Embedded as a part of the membership service, the tool enables brands to rate where they are versus competitors and diagnose where they have the biggest opportunities for improvement.

International Alcoholic Beverage Brand evaluated the Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ) of six brands and six direct competitors using CultureRate:Brand. B-CFQ measures how brands are resonating with consumers, combining six key cultural dimensions: Product Fit, Relevance, Memories, Values, Trust and Advocacy. Each of the component scores can be broken out and compared to competitors across demographics, and then linked to unique insights from the Collage Group database to help close performance gaps.

“Our relationship with Collage Group is a true partnership,” said International Alcoholic Beverage Brand Insights Leader. “Our ‘best in class’ Multicultural insights are only as good as the rich fuel of information, insights, and advice that come from the Collage Group team!”

Further, International Alcoholic Beverage Brand also used Collage Group’s Four-Stage Cultural Fluency Maturity Model to evaluate their own organization. As a result, they have been able to identify a set of organizational actions needed to put them on a path to reach Stage IV, the highest level of maturity.

2) Identify which cultural audiences for International Alcoholic Beverage Brand brands to target.

Through CultureRate:Brand, the brand was evaluated on the Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ), which measures how well brands are resonating with consumers. It assessed the Financial Services & Banking brand along six key cultural dimensions: brand fit, relevance, memories, values, trust and advocacy. The B-CFQ Threshold then helped illuminate for the Financial Services & Banking brand whether their B-CFQ score was high enough to lead to increased brand favorability and purchase intent.

3) Meet the target market where they are.

International Alcoholic Beverage Brand then moved to creating their marketing campaigns and strategic targeting. They called on Collage Group’s consumer essentials and cultural traits framework, which explains the fundamental elements of multicultural consumers. This entails understanding a number of components, including the size of the audience, where these consumers reside, the various demographics, and the economic aspects.

Further, Collage Group advised that when pursuing marketing efforts toward specific buyers, International Alcoholic Beverage Brand needed to understand the nuances. For example, there are very subtle distinctions between Mexican Americans and Cuban Americans that are especially important in regard to authentically connecting with both cohorts.

These insights were then combined with internal tools for communication, program inspiration and design, resulting in the creation of campaigns to test, learn, and launch. In these creative executions they worked to ensure they had good representation of diverse consumers in their ads.

They doubled down on showing up at key cultural moments, such as festivals, where people want to socialize and celebrate, and they integrated cultural nuanced messaging and language into point-of-sale materials. Further, they focused on forging relevant partnerships, for example, for Espolon tequila, International Alcoholic Beverage Brand partnered with Inter Miami CF, a Major League Soccer team.

DELIVERABLES & NEXT STEPS

The resulting Collage Group deliverables included the CultureRate:Brand report, the evaluation of organizational competencies, guidance for prioritizing multicultural audiences for targeting, and a plan to engage multicultural consumers in culturally relevant and authentic ways.

Overall, Collage Group helped International Alcoholic Beverage Brand build empathy with curated insights and optimize brand positioning through culture nuance. International Alcoholic Beverage Brand succeeded in creating culturally fluent processes and capabilities across the organization, which allows this leading alcoholic beverage brand to authentically connect across multicultural consumer segments resulting in better brand positioning and higher ROI for marketing dollars.

Ultimately, International Alcoholic Beverage Brand is on a multicultural journey. They are committed to “inspecting what [they] expect,” and driving continual learning, progress and stronger brand performance. Annually, they will call on Collage Group’s CultureRate:Brand assessments to see how they’ve moved the needle, and repeat the process to continue to succeed on their journey to Cultural Fluency.

In a glowing testimonial from International Alcoholic Beverage Brand’s Insights Director, he stated:

“Our relationship with Collage Group is a true a partnership. International Alcoholic Beverage Brand’s “best in class” Multicultural insights are only as good as the rich fuel of information, insights and advice that come from the Collage Group team!”

Collage Group is pleased to be their partner in the Cultural Fluency journey.

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America’s Iconic Brands Most Effective at Winning Hispanic Consumers
I had the pleasure of taking part in one of our recent in-house studies, which took a look at over 250 iconic brands. In the end, we were able to objectively identify the top 10 brands for Hispanic consumers. 

October 4, 2022
David Evans – Chief Insights Officer

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The evaluation examined brand performance as part of our monthly CultureRate survey and assessed cultural resonance for each major demographic segment.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Top 10 Brands for Hispanic Consumers presentation.

Based on Collage Group’s proprietary metric – the Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ) – the top brands for Hispanic consumers are Walmart, Netflix, McDonald’s, Nike, YouTube, Ross, Google, Visa, Amazon, and Dove. These brands showcase two elements: 1) strong commitment to the Hispanic community and 2) excellence in marketing executions that authentically resonate with the cultural traits and needs of Hispanic consumers.

I should note, the CultureRate database is the largest of its kind available, and its growing annually by over 200,000 responses, or 30 million unique datapoints. Brand leaders apply the findings from CultureRate:Ad and CultureRate:Brand to build cultural fluency, the capability to drive total market growth from inclusive, diverse-led marketing.

As stated, we use the B-CFQ. By this standard, the 10 brands proved to be well ahead of all others in terms of appealing to America’s Hispanic segment. Additionally, three of the brands don’t appear in the top 10 for other segments, and this shows how each segment is distinct.

The B-CFQ reflects brand performance across six dimensions: Fit; Relevance, Memories (of positive past experiences), Values, Trust, and Advocacy (which is the willingness to spread positive word-of-mouth).

With regard to Hispanic consumers, all 10 top brands excelled on Fit and Relevance. Fit measures whether the brand offers a personally desirable product, and Relevance pertains to whether the brand connects with a consumer’s group identity. Moreover, each of the top 10 brands also scored particularly well on one to two additional B-CFQ dimensions.

Xue Bai, the Director of Brand and Ad Health Measurement explains it best: “Brands win by taking the lead in the areas of Fit and Relevance. But the true winners go one step further by differentiating in one or more other areas.”

Bai says successful brands truly excel at creating positive past experiences for consumers, earning their deep trust, or driving positive word-of-mouth. And she points out that each of the 10 brands named have taken these actions within the Hispanic community.

Bai says brands should build their core on Fit and Relevance, and after that, they should choose to focus on one or more of the additional dimensions to craft a winning marketing strategy.

Building Relevance requires upholding and activating Warmth and Rootedness – key traits among Hispanic consumers. Brands should also acknowledge and celebrate Hispanic patriotic pride, and be mindful to connect with the Hispanic sense of destiny and their Optimism.

Brand case studies show that winners succeed at aligning brand positioning with the cultural traits of Hispanic consumers. When brands take this approach, shoppers reward them by supporting or purchasing their product.

Engaging with Hispanic communities and groups at all levels shows a commitment to Values and builds Trust.

An example of this is seen in Nike’s support of national Hispanic organizations, as the company engaged through connections to specific Hispanic communities in key areas when it partnered with U.S. Sports Camps. The collaboration led to daylong opportunities for Los Angeles area kids to experience baseball.

Brands also prosper when they effectively build Memories and Fit. This entails that a given brand tie their brand value proposition to important Hispanic values of hospitality and intergenerational respect. Further, they should leverage brand strengths that best meet the fluid needs of time starved bicultural families. This means also enticing the Hispanic traits of Resilience and Adventurous mindset.

To that point, McDonald’s chose to honor a trailblazing Latino international icon with their “J Balvin special combo meal.” By placing this item on the menu and recognizing this Latino artist, McDonald’s taps into the exceptional and adventurous Hispanic pallet and mindset.

In conclusion, I would say that in order to build brand loyalty – whether it be with Hispanic shoppers or another segment – brands must go beyond promoting superficial insights. Simply put, that’s just not enough. Brands need to do the necessary research in order to determine ‘the why’. They must grasp how their values and brand positioning truly connects with Hispanic cultural values. This is imperative.

About Collage Group

Collage Group is the leading source of cultural intelligence about diverse consumers to more than 250 of America’s iconic brands across 15 industries. For more than 10 years, Collage Group has developed consumer insights across race and ethnicity, generation, sexual identity, gender and parent-child relationships with a focus on high-growth consumer segments. Members of the Collage Group Cultural Intelligence Programs –Multicultural, Generations, LGBTQ+ & Gender and Parents & Kids–have access to 10+ years of consumer insights and 300+ studies with new data unveiled weekly. Learn more about why America’s iconic brands turn to Collage Group for diverse consumer insights and best practices.

About CultureRate

With CultureRate:Ad and Brand, Collage Group provides competitive rankings of all top brands and ads in every major category. The CultureRate database is the largest of its kind available, growing annually by over 200,000 responses or 30 million unique datapoints. Through a deep oversample of diverse Americans, brand leaders can access rich insight into how consumers process brands and ads across race and ethnicity, generation, sexual orientation and gender. ​Brand leaders apply the findings from CultureRate:Ad and CultureRate:Brand to build cultural fluency, the capability to drive total market growth from inclusive, diverse-led marketing.

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Other Recent Hispanic Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

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The New Marketing Imperative: How Brands Win by Navigating Diverse America’s Evolving Priorities

In 2022, increasing polarization on social issues revealed that America’s cultural divisions are likely here to stay. Further, it has become clear that conventional wisdom is no longer reliable, particularly in regard to where various segments stand on social matters. 

October 3, 2022
David Evans – Chief Insights Officer

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Collage Group’s Virtual Annual Member Roundtable is Thursday, Nov. 3 from 1 – 4 p.m. ET

National events are reshaping many of the priorities and perspectives of Americans in unexpected ways. The upshot is that brands may miss the mark if they assume embracing diverse segments requires aligning around a specific activist or political point of view.  

To navigate this minefield, it’s necessary to deeply understand where America’s diverse consumers stand on these issues and how they respond to brand activism. 

CMO Panelists

Francesco Lagutaine
Chief Marketing Officer

Michael Smith
Chief Marketing Officer

Gary Osifchin
Chief Marketing Officer & GM, US Hygiene

Here are some highlights from our agenda. Download the full agenda.

America Now 2022: Harnessing American Identity to Navigate Social Issues

Our Keystone presentation, America Now, will reveal Americans’ stances on major issues including race relations, abortion, climate change, LGBTQ+ rights, and challenges with personal finances and inflation. Throughout this presentation, we will go deeper than ever before, addressing if and how Americans want brands to respond to these social issues. 

The core of our research unveils how diverse consumer segments respond to the central ideas that have driven marketing for decades, such as the belief in the American Dream. In a time of radical cultural transformation, learn how brands can activate diverse segments with these core ideas in flux.

CultureRate Ad and Brand Performance: Engage Diverse Consumers with Lessons in Cultural Fluency

In this section of the Roundtable, you’ll access insights learned from our proprietary CultureRate database as we reveal new learnings into how your brand can differentiate and win across the diverse consumer spectrum.

Whether you are targeting across all consumer segments, working to resonate with multicultural consumers generally, or targeting a specific race or ethnicity, this research covers the bases on what works and why in ads–and provides examples from the brands that are winning in each case.

Our team calls out key lessons from winning brands and ads to guide you as you plan your marketing campaigns post- mid-term elections and into the new year.

CMO Panel: Succeeding Amidst America’s Cultural Divisions

Collage Group members have thought deeply about how to successfully navigate America’s cultural divisions that are likely here to stay. In this panel discussion with Chief Marketing Officers from America’s iconic brands, including M&T Bank, NPR and Reckitt, you’ll hear directly from them about the actions they are undertaking in marketing and insights strategy to successfully navigate the new social landscape.

Don’t miss this chance to learn how to navigate the challenge of connecting with diverse American consumers–across race, ethnicity, generation, sexual identity, and gender. Reserve your spot today!

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Other Recent Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

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The Next Frontier: Older Gen Alpha and Younger Gen Z
Are you effectively engaging the youngest – and most diverse – consumer segments in America?

September 23, 2022
Natalie Griffith – Director, Product & Content

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If not, then you’re not only missing out on forging a connection that will pay dividends for years to come, you also may be missing out on connecting with their parents, who control a sizeable portion of spending today. Keep reading to learn more about how Collage Group can help you better connect with older Gen Z, younger Gen Alpha, and their (mostly) Gen X and Millennial parents.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
The Next Frontier: Older Gen Alpha and Younger Gen Z presentation.

There are currently more than 62 million American parents living with children under 18. These individuals constitute an outsized opportunity for brands as they’re making spending decisions for both themselves and their kids. As kids in America reach majority minority status, it’s becoming harder to know how to authentically connect with kids (and parents) of different cultural backgrounds.

To fully capture the attention of parents and kids today, organizations must learn to speak to and connect with this newest generation of families.

Collage Group’s Parents & Kids Program offers organizations the insights they need to fully understand today’s modern families and how they differ across race, ethnicity, and generation on important issues and topics, at both the consumer and category level. The fifth presentation in the Parents and Kids program, attached here as a webinar replay and PowerPoint, provides primary research on kids 6-12, as well as their parents. This research will ensure organizations appreciate the full picture of the modern American family.

Key Insight #1:Gen Alpha and Gen Z are the most racially and ethnically diverse cohorts of Americans to date. Gen Alpha is the first majority-minority generation, with only 48% of the cohort identifying as non-Hispanic White.

Context:

The increase in interracial and interethnic marriages over the past 50 years, steady immigration, and higher birthrates among multicultural women have led to an increasingly diverse population of younger Americans. In turn, the youth is coming of age surrounded by and expecting greater diversity in all aspects of life.

Action Steps:

    • Reflect America’s growing diversity in your advertising.
    • Start working now to win and build relationships with your future consumers by understanding how to best connect with culturally diverse Americans.

Key Insight #2: For kids today, standing out is the new fitting in. And differentiators have shifted too – kids view their mindsets as more differentiating than traditional markers like looks or skin color.

Context:

Kids today have grown up with diversity as the norm, so differences based on skin color or ethnicity do not stand out as strongly for them as they did for previous generations of kids. Instead, differentiators like mindset and interests are more prominent.

Action Steps:

    • Celebrate diversity along multiple facets – from interests to ethnicity

Key Insight #3: Today’s kids, especially girls, are eagerly pushing the boundaries and even rejecting the very premise of gendered play. This pushback goes well beyond the superficial elements such as packaging and shelf placement: Kids today firmly believe that toys are created for all.

Context:

The fact that young girls today are rejecting gender-based stereotypes in play is a logical extension of the decades’ long conversation around gendered roles and expectations. An incremental, yet powerful shift in higher education and in the workplace is erasing the lines between traditionally “gendered” careers. In popular culture, strong female-lead characters are defying the stereotype of a dainty damsel in distress. And many parents today deliberately choose to avoid such stereotyping. This shift  is both lauded by the voices promoting gender equality and derided by more conservative critics. 

Action Steps:

    • Manufacturers and retailers should watch this space closely. As kids increasingly perceive toys as gender-neutral and play with any toy they choose, brands that lean in can get first-mover advantage, especially if they can do so without getting political. But this privilege may come with a burden of some backlash, at least initially. To appeal to a broader customer base, consider offering several product line varieties or designing store layouts in a way that accommodates both mindsets.

Key Insight #4: Digital media, including on-demand streaming services, multiplayer video games, and social media platforms, dominate kids’ time and attention today. While parents continue to monitor and supervise their children’s online activity, Older Gen Alpha and Younger Gen Z are expertly and confidently navigating the digital world.

Context:

The unprecedented pace and breadth of tech innovation has allowed these digital natives to gain agency, serve their personal and collective interests (from hobbies to social causes), and amplify their voices. Peer-to-peer collaboration and connection, exposure to always-on surveillance and tracking, and a need to balance and reconcile the images they project online and in real life (IRL) will mark Gen Z and Gen Alpha segments’ relationship with people and technology for the foreseeable future.

Action Steps:

    • Meet these young consumers where they are. Where appropriate, use your digital platforms to amplify their voices.
    • Create consistent and coherent experiences across channels — both online and IRL.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Parents and Kids Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Natalie Griffith
Director, Product & Content

Natalie has over 10 years of experience in consumer insights and brand strategy, including 3+ years as lead researcher in Gartner Iconoculture’s Gen Z practice. Natalie has managed research projects across industries, including extensive work in financial services, media, technology, and food and beverage. Natalie holds a B.S. in Psychology from Tulane University.

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New Diverse Consumer Insights for Q4 2022

More than 250 of America’s top brands have access to the deep cultural insights needed to engage America’s diverse consumers. Do you?

September 20, 2022
David Evans – Chief Insights Officer

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Here’s an overview of the new reports we’re releasing in Q4 2022 and beyond that you’re missing out on.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these
diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

2022 Virtual Members-Only Roundtable

In 2022, increasing polarization around social issues has revealed that America’s cultural divisions are likely here to stay. But it has also become clear that the conventional wisdom regarding where various segments stand on social issues is no longer fully accurate. National events are reshaping many of the priorities and perspectives of Americans in unexpected ways. The upshot is that brands may miss the mark if they assume embracing diverse segments requires aligning around a specific activist or political point of view.

To navigate this minefield, brands need a clear understanding of where Americans across diverse segments stand on these issues and how they respond to brand activism. Collage Group’s 2022 Virtual Members-Only Roundtable, featuring updates to our America Now and CultureRate research, will help brands and organizations navigate the challenge of connecting during this period of uncertainty and confusion. Attendees will walk away with insights and tools to make data-driven decisions that will maximize connection.

Category Essentials

Our category-specific research evaluates consumer attitudes and behaviors across specific consumer goods industries. New proprietary deliverables, which include deeper category insights identified by member request, will be made available for each of our four memberships throughout the fall.

Media Habits & Channels

Learn how to connect with diverse consumers by engaging them through media. This quarter we will explore Americans’ behaviors and attitudes related to various entertainment and social media (visual, social, audio). Our research centers on both traditional media and content, as well as new channel preferences.

CultureRate

Through insights gleaned from our CultureRate database, we will unveil lessons learned from top performers across diverse segments. CultureRate provides a one-stop solution for our members’ mounting need for a comprehensive, ongoing analysis of the cultural fluency of their brands. Cultural fluency is crucial to future growth as American consumers become more responsive to multicultural themes, representation, and stories. In our all-new Q4 research, learn how CultureRate continues to be an asset for companies, many which are leveraging the largest database of its kind available and growing annually by over 200,000 responses or 30 million unique datapoints.

Parents & Kids

Create a lifetime of brand loyalty by tapping into the evolving needs of parents and their children. With rapidly changing demographics, families are becoming more racially and ethnically diverse. Discover how your brand can leverage these insights to better engage parents and kids.

Health & Wellness

Health affects every community in America, and is a key area of interest for consumers, especially as we approach a post-pandemic America. Learn more in this exploration of diverse consumer health and wellness attitudes and behaviors, covering payers, providers, and industry insights.

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Other Recent Research Articles & Insights from Collage Group

David Evans
Chief Insights Officer

David serves as the Chief Insights Officer responsible for content, data science and innovation. He is passionate about creating the critical insights that can transform the fortunes of our members, informing how we create an unparalleled member experience with our products, and build great places to work.

Get In Touch.

There's a world of Data Insight Opportunity just for you

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Brand Leaders from Paramount, H-E-B and Adsmovil on Engaging and Celebrating Hispanic Culture
Last week I had the pleasure of moderating an engaging and informative panel discussion on how brands connect with and celebrate Hispanic culture. 

September 20, 2022
Victor Paredes – Executive Director of Cultural Strategy

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The conversation was very enlightening and purposely held on September 15, the first day of National Hispanic Heritage Month.

Read on and fill out the form below to watch the full presentation,
How Great Brands Are Engaging & Celebrating Hispanic Culture.

As the Executive Director of Cultural Strategy at Collage Group, I am always looking to help our members absorb our research and findings, and then move to translate that insight into actions. With cutting edge research and analysts on our team, including trusted colleague Jack Mackinnon – Collage’s Senior Director of Product and Content – I’m perpetually armed with the latest information and data. In having our discussion, I wanted to share Collage’s findings so others may better understand how to approach and celebrate the culture.

Jack joined our panel briefly to offer a quick synopsis on modern Hispanic consumers. He first provided a bit of background on Hispanic and Latino terminology and the internal diversity within the Hispanic culture. These insights are key to any company looking to capture this audience’s attention. Jack also discussed the growth of the Hispanic community over time. One noteworthy stat he cited involved the projected increase of the population; multicultural Americans are expected to surpass the non-Hispanic White population in the 2040s.

With such growth anticipated, brands must take notice and prepare a strategy to reach these segments.

According to Collage research, 57% of Hispanics celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month. Not to mention just under 15% of the Black population and almost the same percentage of the Asian population also observe the month. Moreover, 91% of the Hispanic community either wants, or doesn’t object to, brands including Hispanic Heritage Month within their advertising.

Panelist Maria Twena, Chief Marketing Officer at Adsmovil, noted that 55% of U.S. Hispanics either came to the country as a child at age 10 or younger, or are a child with at least one foreign born, immigrant parent. Maria says this bilingual, bicultural segment is the largest within the Hispanic market. Brands are aware of this demographic and as one part of their approach, they have wisely started to vie for this group’s attention.

“They inform brand and product purchases at a very early age,” she said of this cohort. “We’re seeing brands focus more on that segment as a primary target – keeping the Spanish dominant as a core target, obviously, but a shift is slowly happening in terms of who the primary target is.”

Angel Bellon, Senior Director of Creative Strategy & Cultural Intelligence at Paramount, called on brands, and society as a whole, to move away from the myth that advertisements toward the Hispanic community must include Spanish speaking.

“It’s time to look beyond language,” Angel said.

“Of course, Spanish language advertising is going to be effective because its recognition of our identity as a community,” Angel continued. “However, the representation of our community is much more current when we look at English speaking.”

Angel cited that 75% of Hispanics are fluent in English and only 28% are unacculturated. Thus, a large majority of Hispanics are totally comfortable with English, according to Angel, and brands should act accordingly when looking to market to them. Angel’s point was a good one. Spanish speaking ads are indeed effective and there are certainly times and cases where the Spanish language should be used. However, as Angel also stated, Hispanics are very comfortable with English and brands must appreciate that when looking to reach out to the community.

Brands, Angel said, should celebrate Hispanics’ cultural impact, and ought to educate people on the diversity that exists within the Hispanic community. Such a strategy would be much more effective than merely concentrating on language.

Erika Prosper, Senior Director of Customer Insights at H-E-B, and the first lady of San Antonio, suggested that brands and marketers move to better understand codeswitching and thus work it within their advertising. She also instructed brands to hire more people of color, but warned against simply bringing talent aboard for the sake of diversity. “You need to make sure that you’re not just bringing them for show, but you’re following through with their recommendations,” she said.

“You have to have that inclusion at every level, not just the top of the table, and not just at the bottom, putting products on the shelf,” Erika said. “You have to make sure it’s all the way through.”

Angel agreed, saying often times when brands stumble or get it wrong, it’s usually those brands that have not had a single person of color involved in the strategizing.

“If you don’t have those people, then you shouldn’t be talking to the Latino community,” Angel said. “Targeting to the Hispanic community is a privilege, not a right.” Brands, Angel said, should ask “have we earned the right to speak to the Hispanic community?” And that benefit is earned through initiatives and recognizing that the community is there every day of the year, not just during Hispanic Heritage Month.

Erika made a point to mention her attire, a colorful outfit that displayed Hispanic heritage pride. She articulated the importance of being able to dress in a way that gave a nod to the culture, and to do so without fearing backlash or a negative response from her employer or colleagues.

One of my favorite parts of our conversation was getting a chance to hear Maria speak a bit about the children’s book she authored titled, “School Crossing.” Her own childhood was the inspiration as she, like the book’s main character, grew up in America, living with her immigrant Hispanic family.

“I always felt like an outsider at home and at school, and society didn’t reflect my life experience.” So, with that, Maria set out to create a character that was “authentically Latina, bilingual, bicultural and struggling with belonging.”

It is a very interesting, and also an important story, as there are many young people out there who share that experience and who can relate.

Again, I thought our panel discussion was fascinating! It was interesting, educational and informative, as we offer numerous tips to brands on how to better connect with the Hispanic community.

The entire conversation can be viewed by filling out the form above, and any company looking to gain further insights on engaging with the community can contact Collage Group at the form below.

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Other Recent Hispanic Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Victor Paredes
Executive Director of Cultural Strategy

Victor Paredes, Executive Director of Cultural Strategy, is a successful marketing and advertising executive leader with proven experience in building practices that drive brand equity, sales, traffic, and qualified leads. His marketing experience spans sectors such as entertainment, hospitality, healthcare, consumer packaged goods, and direct to consumer services. Throughout his career, Victor has led multidisciplinary teams of strategy, digital, media, promotions and public relations experts in building effective integrated marketing platforms. Today, Victor brings keen cultural competence to creative storytelling and leadership in a multicultural America.

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Holidays & Occasions: Hispanic Heritage Month
Over half of Hispanic Americans celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month and want brands like yours to activate on this important commemoration. Keep reading to learn how consumers prepare and celebrate this important time.

September 13, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

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Hispanic Heritage Month is a time to celebrate the ever-expanding contributions of Hispanic Americans to U.S. history and culture. The celebration originated as Hispanic Heritage Week in 1968 but was expanded to a full month in 1988. Rather than taking place within a calendar month, Hispanic Heritage Month begins on September 15th to commemorate the Independence Day of the Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. It also includes Independence Day for Mexico on the 16th, Chile on the 18th, and concludes with Día De La Raza, on October 12th.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Multicultural Holidays & Occasions: Hispanic Heritage Month  presentation.

According to Collage Group’s Holidays and Occasions survey from 2021, 57 percent of Hispanic Americans celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month, supporting Hispanic-owned businesses and enjoying traditional Hispanic foods and beverages, among other activities. 42 percent of the total Hispanic population say that this month is important to them, making it an opportunity to activate and reach Hispanic American Consumers.

Key Insight #1

Most Hispanic Americans are open to brands activating on Hispanic Heritage Month in their marketing and advertising. They are mostly interested in brands educating Americans about Hispanic cultures and their continued influence in America today.

Most Hispanic Americans are open to brands activating on Hispanic Heritage Month

Implication:

Create marketing campaigns that not only celebrate Hispanic Americans but inform people on specific contributions of Hispanics to American culture.

Key Insight #2:

Bicultural consumers are most likely to buy products that are created specifically for Hispanic Heritage Month.

Implication:

Craft culturally specific messaging that speaks on the duality of feeling both American and Hispanic. Make use of Spanglish to connect with bicultural consumers.

Key Insight #3:

Hispanic Americans take pride in their persistence in the face of adversity and would like to see brands acknowledging their people’s perseverance.

Implication:

Bring the spirit of perseverance to your campaign, highlighting the importance of resilience for people in the Hispanic community.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Understanding Hispanic American Acculturation
The Hispanic population in the U.S. is large and growing. Understanding the diversity within the segment as well as their priorities is vital for brands and marketers to grow right alongside this critical American consumer segment.

September 13, 2022
Sudipti Kumar – Associate Director

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As of the 2020 Census, there were 62 million Americans who identified as Hispanic. This segment accounts for over 50% of total population growth in the U.S. and it’s native-born Hispanic Americans– not new immigrants to the country–  who are driving virtually all of that growth.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Understanding Hispanic Americans  presentation.

Importantly, the segment is comprised of three sub-groups across the spectrum of acculturation: acculturatedbicultural, and unacculturated.

Those sub-groups are based on Collage’s own acculturation model designed to better understand the Hispanic segment through cultural preferences. Our model mostly focuses on language usage (Spanish, English, or both) but also includes an identity component. And, when we look at the population of Hispanic Americans by acculturation, we see that the largest and fastest growing group is Bicultural Hispanic Americans. In addition to proportional size, the Bicultural Hispanic segment is also the youngest, ensuring future growth (and importance to your messaging) too.

But, to better understand Hispanic American consumers, you need to go beyond demographic size and acculturation. Our recent research into Hispanic identity and behavior offers a set of key findings for brands and marketers when it comes to understanding and engaging with Hispanic Americans.

    1. Hispanic Americans prefer the terms Hispanic and Latino/Latina as their identifiers. There are also some terms the segment clearly does not prefer.
    2. Ethnicity and country of origin are key parts of Hispanic Americans’  identity and supersede other characteristics, like gender or life stage.
    3. Hispanic Americans are a uniquely positive segment, displaying optimism even when times are tough.
    4. Hispanic Americans are social media super users. The segment’s overall youth and forward-thinking nature have a big part to play in this.
    5. Hispanic Americans want to preserve their culture while living in America, particularly through cooking and enjoying traditional meals.

Keep reading to learn more about each of the key findings above  and download the attached document for a selection of our summary findings.

 

Key Finding #1: Hispanic Americans prefer the terms Hispanic and Latino/Latina as their identifiers. There are also some terms the segment clearly does not prefer.

When it comes to identifying terms, Hispanic Americans clearly have a preference. “Hispanic” and “Latino/Latina” top the list overall for the segment, with “Hispanic American” winning overall especially with Mexican Americans. South Americans and Central Americans are more inclined to use the label Latino/Latina.

For Puerto Ricans and Cuban Americans, their preference for using country of origin as their prime identifier really shows up, as well.

Despite the recent popularity of the term “Latinx” to denote inclusivity, you can see that it clearly does not resonate with many Hispanic Americans;  It’s the lowest on the list, alongside “Latine” and “Person of Color.”

Action Step: Use either the terms Hispanic or Latino/Latina when you want to refer to Hispanic Americans in general.

If your target is Latin Americans living in the US, defer to Latino/Latina. And keep in mind that despite broad appeal, these terms are not technically synonymous. Hispanic refers to people from Spanish-speaking countries, while Latino/Latina refers to the geography of Latin America.

Key Finding #2: Ethnicity and country of origin are key parts of Hispanic Americans’ identity and supersede other characteristics, like gender or life stage.

In a recent survey, we asked Hispanic Americans which three aspects of their identity they would use to describe themselves. Hispanic/Latino heritage (i.e. ethnicity) tops the list at 63%. And when we look at this by Acculturation, we see that the percentage for Hispanic/Latino heritage jumps to 79% for the Unacculturated segment and 68% for the Bicultural Hispanic Americans.

What’s more, country of origin also moves up higher for Unacculturated Hispanic Americans with 46% of them noting this as a key part of who they are. This is likely due to the sub-segment’s stronger affiliation with the U.S. rather than another country. Acculturated Hispanic Americans lean into their personality and race more than other Hispanic Americans. But despite those differences, Hispanic/Latino heritage is still in the top three for the Acculturated segment too.

Action Step: Craft marketing messaging that celebrates the diversity of the segment.

Even when messaging is narrowly targeted to a specific Hispanic sub-segment, the crossover appeal of taking the time to understand the nuances of identity will be seen and valued across the entire segment.

Key Finding #3: Hispanic Americans are a uniquely positive segment, displaying optimism even when times are tough.

Collage Group’s Group Trait work is based on 75 focused, nuanced, and culturally specific agreement scale questions in a targeted survey. The data is analyzed based on rank, differentiation and overall agreement for a target consumer group versus others.

For Hispanic Americans, four Group Traits popped: Culture-Focused, Positivity, Warmth, and Engaged.

Let’s look at one of the key group traits for the segment: Positivity. Here you can see how Hispanic Americans uniquely resonate with the cultural statements “Resilient”, “Optimistic”, and “Destined.” The combination of these three statements helps us understand the positive mindset of Hispanic Americans. Even though the segment has experienced many hardships while immigrating to and living in this country they look excitedly into the future.

Action Step: Offer optimism in these uncertain times by communicating uplifting themes that speak to resilience and overcoming adversity.

That doesn’t mean you should sugar-coat hard realities but do communicate honest messages with confidence and hopefulness.

Key Finding #4: Hispanic Americans are social media super users. The segment’s overall youth and forward-thinking nature have a big part to play in this.

Hispanic Americans are more likely to post on social media daily, visit social media to find communities where they belong and use popular newer social media platforms. In almost every arena, Hispanic Americans are more likely to post on social media and use those platforms for recommendations across categories like restaurants, fitness and exercise, and fashion.

The segment is also younger than any other racial or ethnic groups in America and that certainly plays a role in their collective interest in social media., But their penchant for digital communication and content consumption is also tied to the segment’s unique focus on being forward-thinking and open to new types of technology sooner than others.

Action Step: Speak up and harness word of mouth marketing through social media.​

Hispanic Americans are highly connected through technology and value the opinions of those in their network.

Key Finding #5: Hispanic Americans want to preserve their culture while living in America, particularly through cooking and enjoying traditional meals.

Another group trait that is highly relevant for Hispanic Americans is their Culture-Focus. That means they care a lot about maintaining their heritage even while living in the U.S. There are so many ways to preserve traditions, but cooking and enjoying traditional meals together may be one of the biggest. In fact, 9 in 10 Unacculturated and Bicultural Hispanic Americans believe that cooking meals from their culture is an important way to maintain traditions, and its still pretty high for Acculturated Hispanic Americans too.

Action Step: Highlight Hispanic Americans cooking and sharing traditional meals with their family.

This also promotes their family focus alongside their commitment to maintaining their culture.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Hispanic Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Sudipti Kumar
Associate Director

Sudipti is an Associate Director on Collage Group’s Product and Content team. She is a graduate from NYU’s Stern School of Business where she studied finance and marketing, and Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs where she received her Masters in Public Administration. In her spare time, Sudipti enjoys reading, cooking, and learning to crochet.

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Advertising to Hispanic American Consumers: Learnings from CultureRate:Ad Analysis
Resonating with Hispanic Americans goes beyond simply translating advertising from English to Spanish. CultureRate:Ad analysis reveals that successful ads do much more than use language to win Hispanic consumers.

September 12, 2022
Giana Damianos – Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

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Hispanic Americans are an important consumer group, with the second-highest population representation and purchasing power in the U.S. Brands trying to win Hispanic consumers face a multitude of inroads to reach the segment: Spanish language, cultural cues, representation, core values like family, key issues like immigration, and so much more.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
CultureRate:Ad: Spanish Language Ad Analysis presentation.

But many of these options offer unclear returns, leaving many brands reliant on the default strategy of just translating ads originally created for the mainstream.

Collage Group’s CultureRate:Ad analysis reveals new insights into what works, crystallizing a set of choices brands can make to up their game. This report provides an in-depth analysis of the use of Spanish language in advertising, with a comparative look at resonance across acculturation groups, as well as a contrasting viewpoint of high-scoring English language ads.

This study pulls in demographic background on the segment, as well as broader context around Hispanic identity, importance of language, and overarching Hispanic Group Traits—all of which offer a holistic view of Hispanic Americans and provide clues to inform brand strategy.

Top 15 Ads by Acculturation
  1. Spanish language ads tend to perform better with Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanics—but English ads still dominate the top 15 for these segments.

    • Takeaway: Use Spanish language when it’s an authentic element of the story, but don’t rely on it to drive performance. Bolster ads (regardless of language) with authentic cultural cues and multicultural representation.
  2. Multicultural representation is key to resonating with all segments, but it doesn’t have to be of Hispanics—representation of other segments frequently halos into the top 15 too.

    • Takeaway: Choose Hispanic representation when it aligns with the ad’s message and content. In other words, don’t just substitute multicultural actors into an otherwise White-led ad. Multicultural inclusion goes hand-in-hand with cultural cues that are specific and relevant to that segment.
  3. Both vignette and specific-story ads will resonate across segments equally well, but each have their pros and cons.

    • Takeaway: Consider the tradeoffs of using each ad style, and choose based on the best fit with your brand’s broader marketing strategy.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Other Recent Hispanic Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Giana Damianos
Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

Giana joined Collage in 2019 from Indiana University, where she studied economics, political science and psychology. In her spare time, Giana is getting to know Washington DC and its historic architecture.

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