Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Brands: Alcoholic Beverages

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Brands: Alcoholic Beverages
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Collage Group just launched new syndicated research streams ranking ads and brands on cultural fluency. AdRate and BrandRate are major new initiatives that provide a solution to our members’ mounting need for a comprehensive, ongoing analysis of the cultural fluency of branding and advertising. 

AdRate and BrandRate are part of a larger initiative to place every member’s brands and ads at the center of what we do. In the last two weeks, we begin our 2020 BrandRate initiative with the release of rankings in alcoholic beverages.

Our rating system is built on two years of research into how best to measure cultural fluency. Our 2020 initiative is the first step toward realizing a vision of a comprehensive and transparent database that reveals what works and what doesn’t.

AdRate is based on over 120,000 responses to approximately 150 ads in 8 categories, with deep multicultural, Millennial and Gen Z oversample. We piloted BrandRate with four investigations testing over 100 brands with 6000 consumer responses.

For each investigation we are testing ads and brands with approximately 450-500 consumers between 18-39 (21-39 for alcoholic beverages) equally divided across three levels of Hispanic acculturation, Black, Asian and White. Except for personal care and beauty categories, the sample is equally divided across gender. We also capture respondents’ cultural attribute profile and other demographics factors. This can enabled detailed assessment and lookalike identification of high frequency, high affinity or culturally similar consumers.

We hope that access to this database will motivate more inclusive advertising to drive up Cultural Fluency across every category.  It’s time to raise the bar for everyone.

alcbevbrands

In that spirit, we offer all members a free detailed mini-report on one ad and one brand for each membership subscription (Latinum and GenYZ). Members may obtain additional reports on any ad or brand 2 and 3 credits respectively, or add additional ad and brands (and obtain reports) for the same fee.

We also offer members the opportunity to commission detailed custom analyses of our data or commission engagements to using our rating methodology.

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The Multicultural Growth Opportunity: 2020 Update

The multicultural population in the United States is transforming American culture. For the first time, the white population registered negative growth across the last five years of available data, meaning Multiculturals are now driving OVER 100% of growth and a major share of expenditure growth.

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Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Brands and Ads: Alcoholic Beverages Brands and Personal Care Ads

Measuring the Cultural Fluency of Brands and Ads: Alcoholic Beverages Brands and Personal Care Ads
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Collage Group is ranking ads and brands on our all-new, proprietary cultural fluency metric. Fill out the form to download a sample of the study where you will learn more about our process and find out how top brands rank.

AdRate and BrandRate are major new initiatives that provide a solution to our members’ mounting need for a comprehensive, ongoing analysis of the cultural fluency of branding and advertising.  This is especially for the “New Wave” of younger Americans who regardless of race or ethnicity are highly responsive to multicultural themes, representation and stories.

AdRate and BrandRate are part of a larger initiative to place every member’s brands and ads at the center of what we do. In the last two weeks, we begin our 2020 AdRate and BrandRate initiative with the release of rankings in alcoholic beverages and personal care.

Our rating system is built on two years of research into how best to measure cultural fluency. Our 2020 initiative is the first step toward realizing a vision of a comprehensive and transparent database that reveals what works and what doesn’t. AdRate is based on over 120,000 responses to approximately 150 ads in 8 categories, with deep multicultural, Millennial and Gen Z oversample. We piloted BrandRate with four investigations testing over 100 brands with 6000 consumer responses.

For each investigation we are testing ads and brands with approximately 450-500 consumers between 18-39 (21-39 for alcoholic beverages) equally divided across three levels of Hispanic acculturation, Black, Asian and White. Except for personal care and beauty categories, the sample is equally divided across gender. We also capture respondents’ cultural attribute profile and other demographics factors. This can enable detailed assessment and lookalike identification of high frequency, high affinity or culturally similar consumers.

We hope that access to this database will motivate more inclusive advertising to drive up Cultural Fluency across every category.  It’s time to raise the bar for everyone.

We offer members the opportunity to commission detailed custom analyses of our data or commission engagements to using our rating methodology. If you’d like to learn more about the benefits of Collage Group’s membership, please don’t hesitate to reach out.

Discover More Insights

The Multicultural Growth Opportunity: 2020 Update

The multicultural population in the United States is transforming American culture. For the first time, the white population registered negative growth across the last five years of available data, meaning Multiculturals are now driving OVER 100% of growth and a major share of expenditure growth.

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Capture Financial Service Consumers with the Power of Digital

Capture Financial Service Consumers with the Power of Digital
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Today’s consumers are digital-forward when approaching their personal finances, and brands need to keep up. Learn how multicultural and youth segments are driving online adoption in financial services, and what your brands can do to win their attention, consumption, and loyalty.

Fill out the form to view a clip from our webinar, Capture Financial Service Consumers with the Power of Digital.

Transitioning financial products and services online is an industry imperative. Online services have three powerful advantages over brick-and-mortar:

  1. Online brands can offer better services to more people at lower cost
  2. Online brands can better understand the specific needs and preferences of individual consumers
  3. Online brands can leverage the digital innovations transforming the financial services industry

Succeeding in the digital arena requires not only providing products and services geared towards these three advantages, but also communicating these advantages to consumers. To do this right, financial institutions need to understand the attitudes, preferences, and behaviors of the diverse consumer segments underpinning online adoption in the first place.

In late 2019, we spoke with our membership to understand their most pressing questions about complex digital services in the financial services space. Based on these discussions and our own institutional knowledge, in January 2020 we conducted a nationally representative survey with 2,176 respondents. We over-sampled for household incomes over $50,000/year, to analyze with precision the preferences of relatively affluent consumers. We also over-sampled for Hispanic consumers, across acculturation levels.

What we see from the market is that consumers grapple with three significant barriers when they approach financial services online: data security, institutional trust, and financial literacy. By digging deeper into how these challenges affect consumers across generational and multicultural segments, we identified five actions brands can take to help consumers overcome these challenges.

The 5 Actions to Drive Digital Service Utilization in the Financial Services Industry:

  1. Combat Worry by Educating Consumers on Steps They Can Take to Protect Themselves
  2. Win Consumer Attention by Clarifying the Ways You Help Them Fight Identity Theft
  3. Build Trust by Emphasizing Real-World and Virtual Interactions with Relatable Advisers
  4. Use Language Capabilities to Appeal to Multicultural Consumers Interested in Multi-generational Financial Planning
  5. Offer a Learning Ecosystem Consumers Will Want to Use

Our insights help drive some of the world’s top brands. Talk to us about the benefits of our methodologies.

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The Multicultural Growth Opportunity: 2020 Update

The multicultural population in the United States is transforming American culture. For the first time, the white population registered negative growth across the last five years of available data, meaning Multiculturals are now driving OVER 100% of growth and a major share of expenditure growth.

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The First Deep-Dive into Consumer Behavior in the Time of COVID-19

The First Deep-Dive into Consumer Behavior in the Time of COVID-19
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We are now more than a month into the new normal of the COVID pandemic. Buying patterns have been massively disrupted, millions have lost their jobs with panic buying affecting many categories while others have nearly collapsed.

When it comes to multicultural segments in particular, a few things stand out.  First, culture is a significant determinant of human behavior in this crisis and therefore understanding cultural variation is critical.  Who is stocking up more or less?  Who is listening to influencers more than news and vice versa?  These are questions brands need answers to.

Second, the growth rate of the multicultural population and expenditure in good times is important, but in bad times, that growth rate is critical.  From our scenario modeling, we have seen there is virtually no chance of brand growth in a downturn without successfully activating multicultural consumers.

And finally, multicultural influence on the general population only increases every day.  For brands, that means that building trust and cultural relevance with these segments creates cross-over effects that drive demand across all segments, especially younger white segments.

To successfully address the challenges and take advantage of the opportunities, brands need to understand how culture is intersecting with the current climate to alter attitudes, behaviors, and receptivity to support and outreach.

With this end in mind, Collage Group fielded a study during the last week of March to provide members insights into the attitudes and behaviors of different cultural groups—racial, ethnic, and generational segments—during this time of crisis and uncertainty.   We covered attitudes, COVID mitigation behaviors, employment and finances, buying patterns, time spend, general behaviors and expected future behaviors.

Read below for four top findings from the research. 

Key takeaways

    1. Most people recognize the seriousness of the disease and don’t need to be scared into action.
    2. Avoid alarmist messaging. Remain fact-based and compassionate. Messaging should recognize that people are doing what they can, but can do even more to ensure success.
    3. Hispanic consumers are overwhelmingly feeling the economic impact. And Millennials—a group that has already experienced significant economic hardships due to student loans and the Great Recession—are bracing for more disappointment.
    4. Tell consumers how your brand will support them during these hard times. Offer coupons, extended free trials, etc.  Let them know that you know they’re struggling. This is the time to build connections and trust that can last for years.
    5. Black consumers are more likely than other groups to have bought more food, beverages, personal goods and household goods since the start of the pandemic.
    6. Understand which segments are changing behavior; who to target right now is as important as how to market.
    7. Everyone is spending more time on social media and streaming platforms, but this amplifies the differences in information people receive.  Note that younger consumers, especially younger multicultural consumers use different channels for getting information, relying more on influencers than the news.
    8. Build a culturally fluent channel strategy.  More than ever, brands need to show up in the places where segments retreat into their preferred media bubbles.

Please contact us to learn how our COVID pandemic research can benefit your brand.

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The Multicultural Growth Opportunity: 2020 Update

The multicultural population in the United States is transforming American culture. For the first time, the white population registered negative growth across the last five years of available data, meaning Multiculturals are now driving OVER 100% of growth and a major share of expenditure growth.

Read More »

Optimize Digital Services in the Health Care Space

Optimize Digital Services in the Health Care Space
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Health care costs are high and rising. And many health care companies are leaning on digital services to reduce costs while improving customer satisfaction. To fully realize these benefits, companies need to understand the relevant attitudes and preferences of both multicultural and generational consumers.

Enjoy a complimentary sample of this study by filling out the form.

The cost of health care is a top concern, not only for patients, but for providers, insurers, and vendors too. As a result, organizations and companies working in the health care space are constantly pressed to produce better outcomes on tightening budgets. Tighter margins and the need for change is giving rise to technological innovations that reduce costs.

We’re already seeing digital service innovations take hold in this space: online and mobile platforms to manage health care and insurance plans, virtual visits, and apps and wearable tech to monitor health. These services offer clear efficiencies that translate into hard dollars for health care companies including

  1. Reduced administrative staff
  2. Improved consumer satisfaction
  3. Opportunity to leverage collected data

The cost of health care is a top concern, not only for patients, but for providers, insurers, and vendors too. As a result, organizations and companies working in the health care space are constantly pressed to produce better outcomes on tightening budgets. Tighter margins and the need for change is giving rise to technological innovations that reduce costs.

We’re already seeing digital service innovations take hold in this space: online and mobile platforms to manage health care and insurance plans, virtual visits, and apps and wearable tech to monitor health. These services offer clear efficiencies that translate into hard dollars for health care companies including

  1. Reduced administrative staff
  2. Improved consumer satisfaction
  3. Opportunity to leverage collected data

But to fully realize these efficiencies, organizations need to drive mass utilization of their digital services. This is where marketing and branding have a huge role to play—driving digital service utilization among consumers.  And to do this right, companies need to understand the attitudes, preferences, and behaviors of diverse consumer segments to know how to capture their attention and drive utilization.

In late 2019, we spoke with our membership to understand their most pressing questions about complex digital services in the health care space. We heard the same three questions asked time and again, across health care vendors, providers, and insurers:

  1. Why don’t people use their health insurer’s digital platforms?
  2. What do people want from their digital platform?
  3. What are the emerging trends in health care digital services?

To answer these questions from both the multicultural and generational lens, we conducted a nationally representative survey this January with 2,442 respondents. We over-sampled consumers of older age groups so that we could analyze data with added precision for the Boomer+ generation. We also over-sampled the Hispanic segment across acculturation levels.

Strategic takeaways from our research include:

  1. The top reason consumers don’t use their health insurer’s website or app is that they think it’s unnecessary. They’re used to communicating in other ways, like over the phone. Clearly show them how using digital services will make their lives easier.
  2. People most want to learn about health care topics from online sources. Engage consumers with captivating online media that’s informative and connects them with your services.
  3. Younger and multicultural consumers are the most interested in virtual visits, but they’re also among the most skeptical of the quality of care. Put virtual offerings front and center, and make sure to convey the standards that ensure a high-quality visit.

Discover the Latest Insights

The Multicultural Growth Opportunity: 2020 Update

The multicultural population in the United States is transforming American culture. For the first time, the white population registered negative growth across the last five years of available data, meaning Multiculturals are now driving OVER 100% of growth and a major share of expenditure growth.

Read More »

It’s Christmas in August: We Bring You the Gift of Insight

Want to Win the Holidays? Start Early with these Essential Consumer Insights
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Win the Holidays All Year Long.

This year, research into holidays and occasions was the most requested topic among our clientele of America’s top brands. Many of the calendar holidays are cultural touchpoints that represent billions of dollars in consumer expenditure each year. Whether it’s Mother’s Day, St. Patricks day, Kwanzaa or Christmas – our research can help you understand which audience has the largest buying potential – and how to reach them.

Before you dive into specific holiday insights, take a minute to review the three learnings below that reveal general holiday attitudes among consumer segments.

1.

Consumers value both tradition and individualism in their celebration, particularly Hispanic and African Americans. Show consumers that you understand this tension by illustrating how these segments can use your brand to individualize holiday traditions.

2.

Hispanic and Asian consumers are less likely to celebrate “traditional” American holidays like Fourth of July and Thanksgiving. To win with these consumers around these holidays, focus on segment-relevant themes such as immigration and family.

3.

Consumers are least likely to take offense at brand advertisements that activate on cultural holidays related to their race/ethnicity. If you choose to activate on a cultural holiday, use authentic members of the culture to communicate that the relevant segment is okay with the activation to diffuse concern from other segments.

Three Barbecue Insights to Fire Up Your Connection with Diverse America

Three Barbecue Insights to Fire Up Your Connection with Diverse America
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There’s one month left of summer and that means there are still many summer barbecues to be had. But the end of summer doesn’t mean barbecue season is over. Fall is just around the corner with a plethora of back to school and sports related barbecues.

As you activate with consumers throughout the year around the barbecue occasion, you’ll need to keep in mind how barbecues and cookouts vary for different segments. Multicultural consumers are more likely to agree that there is a difference between barbecues and cookouts.

Don’t miss the next webinar 

Navigating the OTT Revolution and Beyond: How Youth is Changing Content Consumption and the Media Landscape

September 4th, 2019

Our latest research on holidays and occasions features a deep dive into consumers’ barbecue experiences to help you navigate the occasion across segments. Read below for three key insights and download the barbecue insights deck for a deeper dive.

1. African Americans are more likely than other segments to have or attend a barbecue on traditional “barbecue holidays.” Most advertisements on barbecues do not include cultural winks to this segment. Focus on what matters to African Americans when advertising around these specific occasions—food, family/friends, and a lively atmosphere.

2. Hispanics are less likely than other segments to eat traditional barbecue foods such as hot dogs and hamburgers, and more likely to eat steak, chicken, and cultural foods. Make sure to appropriately represent what Hispanics have on their barbecue plates when engaged in targeted advertising.

3. Segments have barbecue-specific drinking preferences. White, Asian and Hispanic consumers lean towards beer, while African Americans prefer liquor. Alcohol brands should target their advertisements accordingly, while reminding consumers there are other available options.

Four Things You Need to Know about African-American Consumers

Four Things You Need to Know About African-American Consumers
  1. The African-American segment skews young. The segment’s median age is 34, 6 years younger than the non-African American population and 9 years younger than the White population. Given their size and relative youth, this segment will continue to be a must-capture for brands for years to come.

2. The African American segment’s share of expenditure growth was two thirds of the White segment’s despite the fact they are one fifth the size. And the segment’s purchasing power and expenditure is likely to continue growing as young African Americans achieve higher education levels.

3. African Americans have a high level of optimism about their personal future, despite the challenges they face and the perception that their path to success is steeper. In fact, the segment’s recognition of their unique challenges fuels their drive to succeed.

4. Across age groups, African Americans have a strong sense of cultural pride and a heightened sense of exceptionalism—i.e., a tendency to focus on one’s own internal uniqueness and the perceived differences that set one apart from others. These factors combine with the desire to share their voice, positioning them as powerful influencers across all segments.

Corporate Sustainability is a Multicultural Priority

Corporate Sustainability is a Multicultural Priority

If you’re trying to target “sustainable” shoppers, read this first.

Which elements of sustainability would multicultural consumers be willing to pay a premium for, and what are they doing to live more eco-conscious lives?

Which elements of sustainability would multicultural consumers be willing to pay a premium for, and what are they doing to live more eco-conscious lives?

 In a political climate that’s failing to meet both social and ecological needs, many consumers are “voting with their dollars” to reward brands that engage in sustainable business practices. If you know where those dollars are going, you can position your brands to be on the receiving end.

We addressed the issue of sustainability in a recent Collage survey, fielded to a nationally representative sample of 3,098 respondents with multicultural and youth oversamples. In it, we asked multicultural consumers if they’d be willing to pay more for certain sustainable business practices, and whether they engage in their own sustainable behaviors.

So how do you get consumers to buycott your products, rather than boycott them? See the attached mini-deck for more information about the following insights:

How well do you know your segments?

1.

  • Asians?
  • African Americans?
  • Hispanics?
  • Whites?
are most willing to pay a premium for brands providing their workers a ‘living wage’ .

2.

Women, especially among
  • African American?
  • Hispanic?
  • Asian?
  • White?
consumers, care more about the humane treatment of animals.

3.

  • White?
  • African American?
  • Asian?
  • Hispanic?
men are most attracted to brands that give back to local communities.

4.

  • African American?
  • Asian?
  • Hispanic?
  • White?
Millennials are the most regular consumers of meat alternatives.

Only this sample of our research has the answers.