Understand and Embrace Generational Consumer Media Habits and Channels

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Understand and Embrace Generational Consumer Media Habits and Channels
Learn how Americans across generations engage with media, including social media, movies, TV shows, music, reading, and podcasts.

November 28, 2022
Giana Damianos – Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Generational Consumer Media Habits & Channels presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 Media Habits and Channels Study provides insights across generations on the specific platforms American media users go to, their media habits, and their preferences for media content. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes.

Key Findings: Social Media

    • All Generations, with the exception of Boomers, use a wide variety of platforms, and they tend to be always ‘on’.
    • This high social media use comes at a cost, Gen Z worries most about the impact on their mental and emotional wellbeing and becoming addicted. All generations have concerns for their privacy and safety.
    • Social media functions as a portal to other media, especially for younger generations.
Primary concerns about use of social media

Context:

Social media is both friend and foe for consumers today. It is a powerful enabler of connection across generations – on the younger end, it provides ways to find community and make new friends, and on the older end it’s a powerful way to reconnect.

But there are downsides too – younger generations feel the pressure of constant comparison that social media forces upon them, and consumers of all generations worry about safety and security.

 Action Steps:

    • Provide ways to mediate the mental and emotional effects of being online.
    • Facilitate meaningful connection by encouraging authentic self-expression.
    • Utilize the power of social media as a discovery engine for other types of media – like new music and shows to watch.

Key Findings: TV & Movies

    • Most generations watch TV shows via online streaming platforms, but for Boomers, watching live TV is still most common.
    • Generations also vary when it comes to what they watch – younger generations show a preference for comedy, whereas older generations show a preference for tv news and action/adventure movies.

Context:

The proliferation of mobile devices has driven demand for streaming platform subscriptions among younger consumers. The accessibility of smart phones, tablets, and laptops offers younger generations the opportunity to stream content on the go.

Further, younger generations’ changing tastes align better with what streaming platforms offer, compared to Boomers who still highly favor news and sports, which are better suited to live TV.

 Action Steps:

    • Find and attract different generations of TV and movie viewers by understanding, and activating, based on where and when they are viewing:
      • Maintain advertising presence across TV formats, but understand that while Boomers may be watching TV more, their viewing is more passive.
      • Meanwhile younger generations are watching more via streaming platforms, but may have shorter attention spans for ads

Key Findings: Music

    • Music is a top passion point for younger consumers. The majority of Gen Z and Millennials would rather listen to music than watch TV.
    • Music is popular across generations for its ability to provide comfort and diversion while multitasking.
      Across Generations, consumers embrace the human element of music – and enjoy creating playlists themselves and sharing musical tastes with others.
47% of Americans would rather listen to music than watch TV

Context:

Music is a powerful comfort – and a powerful connector – across generations, but this is particularly true for Gen Z, a generation that craves human connection and relief from stress and anxiety.

Younger generations are passionate music fans overall, but while Gen Z tends to consume music more passively, their Millennial counterparts are more active in their passions – and like to go out to shows or live music venues.

 Action Steps:

    • Embrace the human element when selecting and promoting music – from showcasing artists stories to background on lyrics
    • Lean into options for music to be both passive and active, depending on consumer needs. For example, create task specific playlists to help consumers as they multitask, or interactive playlists for when music is the main focus.

Key Findings: Reading & Audiobooks

    • Most Americans enjoy reading – but we see significant variation by generation when it comes to format. Millennials are much more likely to consume audiobooks, and are also the most likely generation to embrace digital books.
    • Reasons for reading also vary significantly by generation. Gen Z reads as an escape, whereas older generations read to relax and to learn.
List of reasons why one reads for pleasure

Context:

Life stage and generational values play a big role when it comes to each generations reading style, as well as reasons for reading.

Millennials are often on the go, which is reflected in their penchant for consuming audiobooks as well as digital books that don’t require lugging around their reading material of choice.

The high stress and high pressure that Gen Z faces on a day-to-day basis are reflected in their desire to read as an escape, whereas Boomers entering retirement and looking for new passions are more likely to use reading to learn and to explore new topics.

 Action Steps:

    • Reach on-the-go Millennial readers through on-the-go media – audiobooks and e-readers.
    • Show an understanding of why readers are reading – for Gen Z and Millennials, this means giving them an escape, whereas for older readers, this might mean showing knowledge or skills gained through reading.

Key Findings: Podcasts

    • Podcasts are particularly popular with Millennials, many of whom listen while commuting or otherwise on the go.
    • Consumers across generations are drawn to podcasts for different reasons – Boomers are most likely to say they want to learn something or lean into a passion, whereas Gen Zers look for laughs and stories.

Context:

Millennials have become synonymous with “hustle culture” – and it’s this desire to always be learning, doing, or leveling up, paired with a particularly busy life stage, that contributes to their affinity for podcasting.

Boomers, on the other hand, are entering retirement and many are looking for continuous education opportunities, or simply to learn more about new passions, which we see reflected in the types of podcasts they listen to.

 Action Steps:

    • When developing podcast marketing, consider the context and outcomes your target audience hopes to gain from listening in.
    • For example, orient Millennial targeted ads around added value or information.
    • But if targeting Boomers, focus on teaching about products tied to hobbies or other interests.

Other Digital & Media Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Giana Damianos
Senior Analyst, Syndicated Research

Giana joined Collage in 2019 from Indiana University, where she studied economics, political science and psychology. In her spare time, Giana is getting to know Washington DC and its historic architecture.

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Metaverse, TikTok, AR – Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media

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Metaverse, TikTok, AR – Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media
Learn how Americans across races, ethnicities, and generations engage with emerging technology and media, including the metaverse, AR, VR, emerging social media platforms, and influencers.

November 21, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives, and today’s media landscape is always changing. Technologies like the metaverse, augmented reality, and virtual reality, along with emerging trends in social media like influencer marketing, have the potential to change people’s everyday lives. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand how people feel about these new technologies, their current usage rates, and if they are interested in using them in the future.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Best Practices for Engaging Diverse Consumers in Media presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 study on emerging media provides insights across races, ethnicities, and generations on Americans’ behaviors around the metaverse, AR, VR, wearable smart devices, and NFTs. It also looks at newer and emerging social media platforms like TikTok and BeReal, and the power of influencer marketing.

Key Findings: The Metaverse

    • Millennials, alongside Hispanic and Black Americans are more likely to have tried the metaverse and to believe it is for people like them.
    • 1 in 2 Americans want to learn more about the metaverse and they want brands to play a role in that education. This desire is particularly strong for Black Americans.
    • Entertainment is the most popular reason Americans are interested in the metaverse today. This is particularly true for Black and Hispanic Americans.

Context:

Millennial and Multicultural Americans, particularly Hispanic Americans, are keen to try new technologies as soon as they come out. For Millennials, they have grown up in an era of new tech adoption and now have relatively more resources to buy in to the new tech. Multicultural Americans often turn to technology to explore the world and their own culture, as well as the culture of others.

Many Americans expect brands to be more than just the products and services they offer. Black Americans especially want brands to step up on a host of issues. The lack of clarity still surrounding the metaverse makes it an important opportunity for brands to play a guiding role.

Entertainment holds the key to consumers’ current use (video games, digital concerts, experiences, etc.) and future appeal. Since the metaverse is still in an experimental development phase, entertainment is the most compelling reason for consumers to give the tech a try.

 Action Steps:

    • Develop your metaverse marketing strategy with early adopters – Millennial and multicultural consumers- in mind.
    • During this early phase of the metaverse, take steps to educate consumers about this emerging technology. This can include specific information on what is and isn’t considered the metaverse, the promise the technology holds, and what consumers can expect from your brand on the metaverse.
    • When connecting with Americans on the metaverse, prioritize entertainment experiences. Sponsoring a concert or sports game on the metaverse will be a way to tap into the many Americans who want to use the platform for these experiences.

Key Findings: AR, VR, and Wearable Devices

    • Americans are still not using AR or VR technology at high rates, although many are likely using AR without knowing it.
    • Asian and Hispanic Americans are most likely to use wearable devices. Health and fitness is the leading reason to use these devices, particularly for Asian Americans.

Context:

Many Americans may be unaware that they have used AR in their everyday life because they don’t relate the experience they had with the label of AR. As a result, the concept of “augmented reality” doesn’t have as much traction with consumers as the specific uses and platforms do.

Multicultural Americans, particularly Hispanic and Asian, have a strong passion for fitness. They are more likely to enjoy working out and a wearable device such as an Apple Watch or Fitbit allows them to stay connected to their fitness goals. But, while many Americans use their wearable for fitness, they are also glancing at their wearable throughout the day.

 Action Steps:

    • Don’t get caught up in labeling the technology your brand offers. Many are enjoying the experience they are getting from this technology, even if they don’t use the terminology.
    • Make marketing “glanceable” so that emails and newsfeeds can work in the small screen of the wearable as well.

Key Findings: Social Media and Influencers

    • Short content is the star of social media platforms, and that is especially true for TikTok. Americans lean into short videos whether they are on TikTok for just a few minutes or way longer.
    • While most Americans think that marketing coming directly from brands is more trustworthy than an influencer, they also find influencers and content creators to be trustworthy sources of information.

Context:

TikTok is known for its “snackable” content, and the desire for Americans to see shorter videos aligns with why this platform became so popular to begin with. Shorter content gives viewers control over how much they watch. Even if they end up watching many videos, it still feels more manageable than committing to one, longer piece of content.

Consumers are savvy about influencer marketing, and partnerships with influencers who are transparent and trustworthy will feel more authentic to them. People don’t expect an absence of advertising on social media, but they do prefer it to be clearly identified as such.

 Action Steps:

    • When advertising on TikTok, keep it “snackable” and deliver videos less than one minute in length.
    • When partnering with a content creator on social media, select those that are authentic and trustworthy including offering transparency and honesty in their decisions and potentially going out of their way to combat misinformation.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Winter Holidays: Key Insights and What Brands Need To Know

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Winter Holidays: Key Insights and What Brands Need To Know
Learn how American consumers across racial and ethnic segments prepare for and celebrate the winter holiday season.

October 24, 2022
Elizandra Granillo – Analyst

Holidays and occasions are focal points for many Americans. These events afford people the opportunity to express their cultural traditions and individual preferences through decorations, food and beverage, entertainment, and activities.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Multicultural Holidays & Occasions presentation.

Holidays and occasions are also important for brands and organizations as they present an opportunity to deepen connection with consumer segments. Day of the Dead, Thanksgiving, Christmas and Kwanzaa are some of the key winter holidays brands need to understand to fully capture diverse America’s attention. Collage Group helps marketers and insights leaders connect around this holiday by providing insights that clarify the similarities and differences in how American consumers across diverse segments prepare for and celebrate these holidays. These insights allow for more efficient and effective activations that capture greater mind and market share.

Key Insight #1:

Half of Hispanic Americans celebrate Día de los Muertos, and Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic Americans are most comfortable with brands activating on this holiday.

Key Insight #2:

Most Americans celebrate Thanksgiving, and most Multicultural consumers incorporate non-traditional foods into their Thanksgiving celebrations.

Key Insight #3:

 Hispanic and Asian American segments are more likely to say their Christmas celebrations go beyond “typical” American traditions.

Key Insight #4:

Kwanzaa is a popular holiday, celebrated by many Black Americans.

Key Insight #5:

Black Friday and Cyber Monday are popular for Black and Asian Americans as a kick-off to holiday shopping.

What can my brand do to activate on a winter holiday?

    • Focus on authenticity, particularly if you are activating on a holiday that is celebrated by a specific racial or ethnic segment like Dia de los Muertos and Kwanzaa. Depending on your brand, this can include a simple celebratory message on social media pages, helping to educate the broader community about the holiday, or partnering with in-segment content creators to tell their own personal stories related to the holiday.
    • Highlight what is non-traditional about traditional American holidays. Thanksgiving and Christmas are celebrated across racial and ethnic segments, but many Multicultural Americans have their own traditions based on their heritage and upbringing. Showing the range of how Americans celebrate will appeal to many Americans, particularly those who are Multicultural, and who have different ways of celebrating.

Other Holidays & Occasions Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Elizandra Granillo
Analyst

Elizandra is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. She is a 2020 graduate from San Diego State University where she studied Anthropology. Her previous experience includes ethnographic research across the Tijuana-San Diego Border Region.

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Understand and Embrace Women’s Media Habits and Channels

Understand and Embrace Women’s Media Habits and Channels
Learn how women engage with media, including social media, movies, TV shows, music, reading, and podcasts.

October 18, 2022
Jill Rosenfeld – Research Manager

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Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
Women Consumer Media Habits & Channels presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 Media Habits and Channels Study provides insights on the specific platforms Americans go to, their media habits, and their preferences for media content. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes. This report presents the data and insights through the gender lens.

Key Findings: Social Media

    • Social media serves as one of the keys to discovery and social connection. Women use online platforms to explore their personal interests and passions and stay in touch with their loved ones.
    • Women are slightly less concerned than men about the negative impact of social media on society. However, they are much more wary when it comes to personal priorities, like safety and privacy.

Context:

As women balance the positives and negatives of social media use, their Self-Caring Group Trait will likely guide them towards the types of interactions and platforms that justify their time, attention, and emotional investment.

Action Steps:

    • Be an empathetic, encouraging, and responsible owner of your social media channels. Content moderation and safety guidelines are paramount.
    • To amplify your brand’s presence in the noisy social media environment, sponsor or co-brand with popular social media content creators who appeal to women specifically.  As women seek inspiration and discovery online, your brand’s proximity can help boost lead generation.

Key Findings: Movies and Television

    • Women are not as enthusiastic about movies as they are about TV shows. Instead of watching a movie in a theater or even at home, many prefer binge-watching their favorite show.
    • There are notable genre preferences by gender. Across media, women enjoy comedy, drama, and suspense or thrillers more than men do. Meanwhile, action or adventure and sci-fi are more suited to men’s tastes in movies and TV.
    • Personal recommendations are the leading source of new content discovery for women. These viewers are also delighted to discuss movies and shows they watch with loved ones.

Context:

Women’s Self-Directed Group Trait helps explain why many women would rather string together a series of TV episodes instead of going to the movies. Watching at home offers greater control over content, timing, and personal safety. But this is not reclusive behavior. Socialization is embedded in the viewing experience: from discovery to post-watch lowdown sessions with friends.

Action Step:

    • Advertisers must collaborate with streaming TV providers to finetune technical ad execution to the streaming environment. The goal is a more seamless, subtle, and streaming-native ad experience.
    • Use the power of social listening and cultural trend insights to inform your brand’s creative strategy. Word of mouth and user-generated content related to popular movie and TV releases can be a powerful draw of women’s attention.

Key Findings: Music

    • For women, music is self-care. They often put on tunes to relax or lighten the load of their chores; they sing and dance along, which also helps lift their spirits.
    • Women are also less inclined to feel the pressure of developing or showing off their unique taste in music. Instead, they are more likely to go along with what’s currently popular.

Context:

Women lean into their Self-Care Group Trait by creating a safe and comfortable space in both physical and emotional places. In a fast-paced, news-cycle driven daily grind, busy women use music as a shortcut to respite.

While women’s relative disinterest in pursuing totally unique music interests is seemingly at odds with their Self-Directed Group Trait, it’s really a simple reminder that not every aspect of life demands the same investment of energy that’s required to assert one’s stance.

Action Step:

    • Be an extension of the listening experience, not a nuisance. Since desire to relax and recharge sets women’s listening experience apart, strive to match your tone, pace and the decibel level of the content that your ad or branded message may interrupt.
    • When designing your brand’s musical expression, lean into popular and trending tracks that have broad appeal. These will have a greater chance of resonating with women than more niche tunes will.

Key Findings: Reading

    • Despite the mainstreaming of digital and audio book formats, women still prefer the sensory experience of reading a print book. By extension, they’re also more likely to browse physical bookstores.
    • Women are drawn to fictional storylines, including novels, which lend themselves well to what women are looking for in a book: escape, relaxation, and entertainment.

Context:

Deep down, women’s attachment to physical print books is likely an expression of their desire for self-care. Book-in-hand, she can’t do chores or drive the carpool. A book provides the ultimate me-time, protected from external demands, expectations, or distractions. And preference for escapist, yet entertaining narratives is yet another manifestation of the Self-Caring Group Trait.

Action Steps:

    • Use brick-and-mortar bookstores and other retail locations as standalone media channels. Seize the opportunity to serendipitously get your brand’s message in front of consumers naturally primed for purchase.
    • Brands and products should aim to enhance women’s reading experiences and create a quiet retreat from the world.
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Other Recent Women's Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Jill Rosenfeld

Jill Rosenfeld
Research Manager

Jill is a Research Manager on Collage Group’s Cultural Insights team focusing on the LGBTQ+ and Gender membership. She is a graduate of the University of Michigan’s Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy. In her spare time, Jill enjoys exploring Washington DC’s restaurant scene and practicing yoga.

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Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumers’ Media Habits and Channels

Understand and Embrace LGBTQ+ Consumer Media Habits and Channels
Learn how LGBTQ+ American consumers engage with Media, including social media, movies, TV shows, music, reading, and podcasts.

October 17, 2022
Alonzo Bailey – Data Analyst

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Media is a major aspect of consumers’ everyday lives. Americans spend a significant amount of their time and attention consuming social media, visual entertainment, and audio streaming content. For brands and advertisers across industries to succeed, they need to understand where people are going to consume media content, and why they’re going there.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our
LGBTQ+ Consumer Media Habits & Channels presentation.

Collage Group’s 2022 Media Habits and Channels Study provides insights on the specific platforms LGBTQ+ Americans go to, their media habits, and their preferences for media content. The data dives deep into content and platform drivers—spanning categories, passion points, and identity attributes.

Key Findings: Social Media

    • LGBTQ+ consumers are social media power users. For them, social media is one of the keys to discovery, self-expression, and community.
    • Their active social media use comes at a cost: LGBTQ+ social media users worry about the physical and emotional safety risks and the spread of anti-LGBTQ+ discourse on this digital channel.
    • Still, social media serves as connective tissue for their personal interests and passions: They seek inspiration, discover new media and entertainment content, and connect with other people who have similar interests and life experiences.

Context:

LGBTQ+ consumers are, on average, younger than non-LGBTQ+ Americans, which partially explains the segment’s heightened engagement with social media. This segment’s Proud and Communal Group Traits offer another clue about their appreciation of this channel. Online, they can be themselves, proudly present their identity, and find, and band with like-minded users.

As more seasoned social media users, LGBTQ+ consumers are more likely to have experienced both the ups and downs of social media firsthand.

Action Steps:

    • To reach and engage with LGBTQ+ and younger audiences, build your brand social media presence on more “niche” platforms and look for opportunities for influencer collaborations.
    • Facilitate authentic peer-to-peer and consumer-to-brand interaction on your social media channels. Prioritize inclusive design to better engage with this audience.
    • Be an empathetic, encouraging, and responsible owner of your social media channels. Content moderation and safety guidelines are paramount.

Key Findings: Movies and Television

    • Streaming TV is LGBTQ+ viewers’ preferred way to watch television. Over-the-top streaming services offer on-demand access to the content they might not find elsewhere.
    • On-screen and behind-the-camera representation is extremely important to consumers in this segment. They seek authentic stories about people who share their life experiences, and they champion creatives from other underrepresented groups (e.g. women, people of color).
    • This segment is more likely to appreciate video content for its entertainment value. Genres like animation, horror, and reality TV offer LGBTQ+ viewers a temporary escape from reality. They also value movies and TV shows that drive interactions with others — online and off.

Context:

LGBTQ+ viewers are drawn to streaming both by virtue of their digital nativity and thanks to the relative abundance of LGBTQ+-focused content released to or exclusively produced by streaming companies.

Movies and TV help partially fulfill their desire for social connection — both online and in real life — and their need to retreat from an antagonistic sociopolitical environment.

Action Step:

    • Prioritize streaming in your media budget.
    • Use this segment’s unique genre preferences to produce more resonant creative content.
    • Tap into social media groups and fandom to keep pace with what’s trending for this consumer group.

Key Findings: Music

    • LGBTQ+ consumers are music super fans. From soundtracking mundane daily tasks to spontaneous dance parties or organized music events and festivals — LGBTQ+ listeners are there for it all.
    • Streaming audio services and social media are the key sources of music discovery for LGBTQ+ consumers.

Context:

Social media, including YouTube and audio streaming services, provide easy (and often free) access to a vast variety of music to today’s consumers. LGBTQ+ listeners, who are generally younger than other Americans, are especially well-positioned to take advantage of everything that the musical world has to offer.

Action Step:

    • To better connect with LGBTQ+ consumers through music, find the synergy between their favorite music and video content genres and extend the reach through social media.

Key Findings: Reading

    • Reading may not be Americans’ favorite pastime, but more than a third of LGBTQ+ consumers read at least a few times a week. They are also more likely than their non-LGBTQ+ peers to listen to audiobooks.
    • LGBTQ+ readers pick up a book in search of relaxation, escape from reality, or a chance to use their imagination.

Context:

LGBTQ+ consumers are partial to digital, on-demand content delivery systems, and this preference extends to books and other reading materials. But that doesn’t render print obsolete. Independently owned bookstores that serve the community as spaces for free-spirited living, connection, collaboration, and creativity continue to nurture these readers’ appreciation for physical books.

LGBTQ+ readers’ desire to shelter from reality with a book in hand is akin to their drive toward more escapist content in movies and TV. In the realm of books and graphic novels, this consumer segment can exercise their Proud Group Trait more freely and authentically.

Action Steps:

    • Examine your print ad placement and prioritize print publications specifically targeted at the LGBTQ+ community.
    • Find inspiration for your creative campaigns in popular, trending books as well as LGBTQ+ consumers’ preferred genres.
    • Leverage the power of smaller influencers and online book fandoms to better connect with this consumer group.
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Other Recent LGBTQ+ Research Articles and Insights from Collage Group

Alonzo Bailey

Alonzo Bailey
Data Analyst

Alonzo is an Analyst on Collage Group’s Product & Content team. He is a 2019 graduate of Morehouse College. His previous experience includes business and psychological research at Johns Hopkins University – Carey Business School, Columbia Business School, and the University of Maryland.

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Case Study By Industry | Financial Services & Banking

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Case Study By Industry | Financial Services & Banking

CHALLENGE

The Diverse Segments team of a major Financial Services & Banking brand has a dedicated focus on understanding the specific needs and preferences of consumers to help inform culturally relevant and authentic in-market executions. While the team partners with many market research vendors, they came to Collage Group to add depth to their insights across multicultural and generational consumers in the U.S.  

While the team had developed many successful dedicated advertising executions across the years that speak to cultural nuances, the Financial Services & Banking brand approached Collage Group with a new challenge. They wanted to prove that cultural insights can be applied to create campaigns that widely resonate across the total market, as well. 

SOLUTION

Collage Group has supported many brands in this effort with more than 10 years of quantifiable data evaluating more than 300 brands and ads. The data overwhelmingly shows that culturally resonate advertising featuring a specific segment can and will resonate across broader audiences if done in an authentic, relatable way. This is counter to the thinking that brands face a “trade-off” when deciding between a culturally nuanced dedicated ad aimed at a specific consumer segment and a more generic total market execution.

 

Collage Group partnered with the Financial Services & Banking brand to recommend a solution that would apply the CultureRate:Brand and Ad evaluation methodology in depth across its brand and ads. The result aimed to illuminate that it is possible to break the “genpop vs. targeted” trade-off specifically among the financial sector, helping the Financial Services & Banking brand escape the trap of being generic or forgettable. Further, the solution included key takeaways for the brand to understand where and how they rank among their competitors, and make informed decisions for future ad and brand investments.

CultureRate:Ad Evaluation

Through CultureRate:Ad, the Financial Services & Banking brand’s ads were put to the test as part of a suite of rigorous methodologies that helped brands navigate the rapidly shifting consumer landscape. The ads were evaluated on two metrics: the Ad Cultural Fluency Quotient (A- CFQ) and Backlash, both of which are supported with an exhaustive range of diagnostic metrics.
    • A-CFQ is Collage Group’s proprietary KPI that uses four factors to optimally predict high brand favorability and purchase intent.
    • Backlash metrics take conventional brand favorability a step further by quantifying the degree to which an ad can “flip” perception from positive to negative or vice versa.
Combining A-CFQ and Backlash metrics for target segments revealed the dynamics that made for the Financial Services & Banking brand’s ads successful, or unsuccessful, as compared to their competitors.

CultureRate:Brand Evaluation

Through CultureRate:Brand, the brand was evaluated on the Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ), which measures how well brands are resonating with consumers. It assessed the Financial Services & Banking brand along six key cultural dimensions: brand fit, relevance, memories, values, trust and advocacy. The B-CFQ Threshold then helped illuminate for the Financial Services & Banking brand whether their B-CFQ score was high enough to lead to increased brand favorability and purchase intent.

RESULTS

As a result of the CultureRate:Ad and Brand evaluations, Collage Group provided key insight into how the the Financial Services & Banking company’s brand and ads are performing across each diverse consumer segment – Hispanic, Black, Asian and NH-White consumers – as well as by Hispanic Acculturation level.

 

The findings – which evaluated the Financial Services & Banking company vs. its financial service competitors – showed, that while it may be harder for those in the financial space to develop cultural connections with consumers overall, there are still clear winners that have broken through to resonate with multiple segments simultaneously.

 

Evaluating how the Financial Services & Banking brand performed within each consumer segment, as well as in direct relation to their key competitors, enabled the Financial Services & Banking brand to understand their competitive positioning and make informed decisions for future ad and brand investments. This work was then shared across the Diverse Segments team to illuminate, and take action on, where the brand was winning and identify opportunities for growth.

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Collage Group Case Study | Cell

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Collage Group Case Study | Cell

INDUSTRY: TECHNOLOGY

GLOBAL CORPERATE REVENUE: $183 BILLION

Learn how the world’s leading brands are applying Collage Group’s cultural insights to drive authenticity in marketing that improves cultural resonance.

To demonstrate the company’s commitment to diversity, equity, and inclusion, a global brand of consumer electronic devices planned an integrated brand campaign for Pride Month. As an organization, their objective was to engage multicultural audiences authentically and sustain conversation with diverse consumers. The electronic devices company aimed to shine a light on intersectionality of the communities they seek to engage throughout the year, specifically Black trans women. They saw an opportunity in Pride Month to show up as a brand to support the LGBTQ+ community, going deeper than they had in previous years. This was a key moment for the electronic devices company to elevate the stories and truths of underrepresented communities and carry optimism and advocacy forward throughout the year.

CHALLENGE

A global brand of electronic devices sought insight into how to activate LGBTQ+ consumers, with a specific focus on Black trans women. The Marketing Lead wanted to link category preferences to key segment insights to develop a creative brief for their ad agency for a Pride Month Campaign.

SOLUTION

Using Collage Group’s proprietary CultureRate:Ad data on advertising performance and the Cultural Traits of LGBTQ+ consumers, the company clarified the story line for the creative brief that grounded product features and category specific interests in an appreciation of Cultural Traits and was able to link these to the traits of LGBTQ+ allies. The Marketing Lead rethought the brief in a way that significantly expanded the audience without losing focus on LGBTQ+.  

Tying Objectives to Insights

Collage Group provided the insight and guidance needed to reposition the creative brief to significantly expand its appeal to a larger audience without losing focus on the target segment.

Category-level detail asked for by the client served as a useful, practical starting point for connecting with specific demographics.

OBJECTIVE

More deeply understand LGBTQ+ preferences for consumer electronic device usage.

COLLAGE RESOURCES, DATA & TOOLS

Category Essentials-Media specific to LGBTQ+ consumers provided a range of insights into streaming consumption, social media behavior, and device usage.   

Connecting the Dots

But to connect the dots, Collage’s deep dive into cultural insights allowed brand leaders to interpret the category-level detail into broader strategy and application of the insights.

OBJECTIVES

Immerse in LGBTQ+ cultural experience.

COLLAGE RESOURCES, DATA & TOOLS

Webinars and in-depth Q&A presentations on LGBTQ+ Cultural Traits revealed crucial Cultural Traits that could clarify the storyline particularly on the importance of a highly diverse friend group and low levels of “rootedness” or family ties.

Evaluate the cultural resonance of recent brand and recent ads with LGBTQ+ consumers.

Webinars on understanding Culturally Fluent ads provided essential guidance on casting, stories, and authentic representation.

 

Detailed CultureRate evaluations of recent alcoholic beverage ads leading with Black trans women and registering high Cultural Fluency were used to build confidence in the potential for allyship appeal.

Lean into LGBTQ+ Passion Points that reveal where the segment’s culture comes to life.

Webinars and Presentations on LGBTQ+ Passion Points revealed specific activities including music and fashion preferences that would inform creative decision making.

Putting Insights Into Action

Relying on these insights, and SME support from Collage Group’s in-culture subject matter experts, the Marketing Lead was able to develop a much more powerful creative brief.

Instead of relying solely on insights into the preferences of the (very small albeit visible) segment of Black trans women,  the Marketing Lead was able to reframe the campaign around the much more lucrative combination of this segment and its allies. The following actions were taken:

    • Oriented messaging around Cosmopolitan and Self-Expression, key traits of both LGBTQ+ and Black consumers.
    • Associated electronic device usage with the nuances of specific Passion Points appealing to LGBTQ+ people, including fashion and music.
    • Better positioned the product’s innovative camera features important to photography of diverse friend groups and community members.

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Case Study By Industry | National Public Radio

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Case Study By Industry | National Public Radio

CHALLENGE

NPR was founded 50 years ago with the mission to create a more informed public – one challenged and invigorated by a deeper understanding and appreciation of events, ideas and cultures. This mission remains front and center, as NPR leadership recently challenged the organization to reach a new “North Star”: to diversify the NPR audience to reflect, serve and inspire America. With this focused purpose in mind, NPR’s audience insights team came to Collage Group to gain expertise quickly and in alignment across the enterprise.

SOLUTION

Collage Group partnered with NPR on a solution that would evaluate the perception of the brand among Multicultural consumers and identify key areas of growth opportunity. From there, NPR and Collage would dig deeper to unveil insights and define engagements to improve authentic engagement among key Multicultural segments.

Evaluation of the NPR brand on the CultureRate:Brand tool was one of the first steps taken by Collage Group to bring NPR closer to its goal of reflecting, serving and inspiring all Americans.

Fill out the form to ​watch our webinar, The “CultureRate” Brand and Ad Rating System: Five Lessons for Better Ads and Case Study featuring NPR.

NPR Webinar

CultureRate:Brand Evaluation

Through CultureRate:Brand, the NPR brand was evaluated on the Brand Cultural Fluency Quotient (B-CFQ), which measures how well brands are resonating with consumers. It assessed NPR along six key cultural dimensions: brand fit, relevance, memories, values, trust and advocacy. The B-CFQ Threshold then helped illuminate for NPR where they stood with diverse consumers.

“We were surprised and delighted to learn what we were doing well through the CultureRate report,” says Lori Kaplan, NPR’s Senior Director of Audience Insights. “The report also enabled us to dig deeper into the areas where we still had work to do. For us, this was specifically within the Hispanic and Black communities.”

Based on the B-CFQ, NPR performed well among relevance, trust, advocacy and values. The team was able to leverage this data–combined with an earlier CultureRate:Ad study that revealed existing creative was not resonating among Multicultural audiences–as a jumping point for commissioning an additional, qualitative research project. What followed was a study that unveiled how NPR could emerge as a “go to” media source across Multicultural consumer groups. Further, it helped them understand why they were falling behind within some Multicultural consumer segments.

RESULTS

NPR Mobile App exampleAs a result of the CultureRate:Brand evaluation and custom qualitative research study, NPR was able to answer a key question, “What do audiences want?”

“The research found that Multicultural audiences want to be heard,” says Kaplan. “They want to know that NPR is for them. And, they will see their experiences in our shows and content.”

To respond to this insight, NPR developed new ad creative concepts that Collage Group Subject Matter Experts (SMEs) evaluated for resonance among Multicultural audiences. The final product was the development of a podcast advertising campaign intended to appeal across Multicultural consumer segments with the tagline “More Voices. All Ears.” The campaign aims to illustrate listening, reflecting and sharing across communities and cultures. Further, it incorporates bolder, more inclusive, authentic messages.

The Collage Group CultureRate:Ad study, which tested this “More Voices. All Ears” ad, demonstrated that the campaign raised brand favorability and intent to use among Hispanic, Black and Asian audiences. Complementary research showed that awareness of NPR rose significantly among Black and Hispanic audiences during the campaign period. A qualitative study underscores that the campaign piqued curiosity, stimulated senses and stirred imaginations and helped serve as a “welcome mat” into NPR podcasts. That said, the CultureRate:Ad study also highlighted areas for the marketing team to make the link to NPR stronger and to reduce points of confusion. These were useful learnings to infuse into the next iteration of the campaign. Further, the NPR team found such value in the CultureRate:Ad study that they will be testing several more ads for additional campaigns.

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How Consumers Across Generations Celebrate Mother’s Day

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How Consumers Across Generations Celebrate Mother's Day

Learn how American consumers prepare for and celebrate Mother's Day.

Mother’s Day presents ample opportunity for brands to connect authentically with consumers across generations. Collage Group’s Holidays & Occasions research provides insights on a wide scope of important events that occur throughout the year. In addition to Mother’s Day, members get access to research on holidays such as Thanksgiving, Hispanic Heritage Month, Halloween, Christmas, plus several more. Fill out the form below to view a sample from this year’s Mother’s Day study on Gen Z, Millennials, Gen X and Boomers. 

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This past Mother’s Day, Pandora launched a thoughtful campaign aimed towards younger generations that features Netflix sensation and Stranger Things actor, Millie Bobbie Brown. 

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Key Consumer Insights on Black History Month

Key Consumer Insights on Black History Month

Learn how American consumers prepare for and celebrate Black History Month.

Holidays and occasions are focal points for many Americans. These events afford people the opportunity to express their cultural traditions and individual preferences through decorations, food and beverage, entertainment, and activities.

Fill out the form to view a sample from our research on consumer attitudes and behaviors around Black History Month.

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Heritage months are also important for brands and organizations as they present an opportunity to deepen connection with consumer segments. Black History Month is one occasion brands need to understand to fully capture diverse America’s attention. Collage Group helps marketers and insights leaders connect around this occasion by providing insights that clarify the similarities and differences in how American consumers across diverse segments prepare for and experience Black History Month. These insights allow for more efficient and effective activations that capture greater mind and market share.

America’s leading brands leverage Collage Group’s research on Black Consumers to authentically engage and connect with their audience. Explore more tools that help you connect with this segment. 

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