Connect with America’s Diverse Parents
Are you effectively engaging the 62 million parents currently living in the US with kids under 18? To win in a rapidly diversifying America, it’s crucial to understand these individuals and how they’re raising their children. Keeping reading to learn more about how Collage Group can help you better connect with parents and kids in America.

April 28, 2022
Bryan Miller – Director, Syndicated and Solutions

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There are currently more than 62 million American parents living with children under 18. These individuals constitute an outsized opportunity for brands as they’re making spending decisions for both themselves and their kids. To fully capture parental attention, organizations must understand and address these individuals as parents. But as America continues to diversify, it’s becoming harder to know how to authentically connect with parents of different cultural backgrounds.

Read on and fill out the form for an excerpt from our Parents and Kids : Connect with America’s Diverse Parents presentation.

Collage Group’s Parents & Kids Program offers organizations the insights they need to fully understand parents and how they differ across race, ethnicity, and generation on important issues and topics, at both the consumer and category level. The program also provides primary research on young kids to ensure organizations appreciate the full picture of the current American family. The program’s inaugural webinar series consists of 5 presentations, listed below.

The first presentation is attached here as both a downloadable pdf document and a webinar replay. It offers brands three recommendations to better connect with parents, as well as a warehouse of insights to help brands activate on the recommendations.  The recommendations are:

    1. Speak to the stresses and challenges many parents face
    2. Position your brand as a tool to help parents move their kids closer to their goals
    3. Help parents educate their kids around core culture and identity issues

Several key findings and next steps from this presentation include:

    1. Younger parents, especially Gen Z, are less likely to think that having kids should completely change their lives. Embrace younger parents’ desire to have it all by acknowledging this sentiment and how it shapes their reality.
    2. Multicultural parents place a higher emphasis on their children achieving financial success. Position the desire for their kids’ financial success within the context of persevering through challenges, children realizing the fruits of their parents’ labors, and having the means to take care of loved ones.
    3. Moms are more likely than dads to teach or plan to teach their kids about other identities, including other races, other cultural groups, LGBTQ+ identities, and differently abled people. Prioritize communicating with moms when offering tools to parents that want to teach their kids about these identities.
    4. Around two-thirds of Hispanic and Asian American parents are raising their kids to be bicultural—i.e., actively and fully embracing both being American and of another culture. Consider light-lift social media activations around culturally-specific holidays to drive resonance within the segment, and educate those outside of it.
    5. Almost half of all parents—and 3 in 5 black parents—believe that girls will have a harder time achieving success because of their gender. Acknowledge the gender-related challenges many moms have faced in their own lives, while clarify the steps you’re currently taking to reduce sexism.

Contact us at the form below to learn more about how you can gain access to these diverse consumer insights and much more in our Cultural Intelligence Platform.

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Bryan Miller

Bryan Miller
Director, Syndicated and Solutions

As Director of Content, Bryan leads the content team that produces all of Collage Group’s syndicated research and oversees the AdRate and BrandRate ratings products. Bryan holds a Master of Arts from Georgia State University’s Philosophy and Brains & Behavior Program, a Master of Science in Applied Economics from the University of North Dakota, and a Doctor of Philosophy from Johns Hopkins University in the Philosophy of Science, the Philosophy of Psychology and Bioethics. Outside of work, Bryan is a passionate film buff and lover of great food.

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How Multicultural Americans (Moms, Dads, and Non-Parents) Celebrate Mother’s Day and El Día de las Madres
Mother’s Day is an important holiday for Americans of all backgrounds, but Multicultural segments—especially moms and dads versus non-parents—have nuanced attitudes and celebration styles. Read on for insights curated from our Holidays and Occasions research.

Mother’s Day is one of Americans’ most beloved holidays. It’s a day dedicated to Moms (and maternal figures), honoring their important role in the family. 85% of Americans celebrate it, with an especially strong emphasis from Hispanic Americans (91%). Mother’s Day has the fourth highest average per-person spending of any holiday or occasion according to the National Retail Federation. Mother’s Day occurs every second Sunday of May, which means this year (2022), it will be on May 8th.

Download the attached presentation and take a look at a few key insights and implications below:

However, it’s important to note that while motherhood is celebrated all over the world, it doesn’t always occur on the same date as it does in the United States. For instance, some Latin American countries such as Mexico, El Salvador, and Guatemala celebrate Mother’s Day (El Día de las Madres) on May 10th every year. Many Hispanic-American consumers with heritage from these countries, especially Bicultural and Unacculturated, may prefer to uphold the tradition on the day from their country of origin instead of—or in addition to—the date Mother’s Day is celebrated in the United States. So, this is an important nuance not to be overlooked when activating on multicultural consumers. Plus, it offers an additional day to connect with your brand’s target consumer groups!

As your brand strategizes on how best to resonate with multicultural consumers, take note of the key similarities and differences in how each racial and ethnic segment (as well as differences among Parents and Non-Parents of each demographic) perceives of and celebrates Mother’s Day. Download the attached presentation and read on for key insights and takeaways.

Key Insight #1:

Hispanic Americans are highly involved on Mother’s Day, and this is true for both Parents and Non-Parents. They have higher celebration rates compared to other segments and are usually more likely to participate in celebration activities like hosting a barbecue/cookout, giving cards, and buying gifts.

A Deeper Look:

For Hispanic Americans, Mother’s Day is a family affair. Everyone comes together to honor the matriarch of the family. “It’s important to celebrate mothers because they are the building blocks of the family and they are the teachers,” says Maria Miranda, assistant director of the Arizona Latino Arts and Culture Center. Typical celebrations include extended family gatherings with plenty of food, music, and flowers.

Collage Group’s research on Family Connection underscores the importance of family relationships for Hispanic Americans. Mother’s Day is a natural extension of the segment’s love and appreciation for close family bonds and festive gatherings.

Action Step:

Acknowledge Hispanic Americans’ culturally-dual Mother’s Day celebrations, including the difference in celebration dates, through your marketing efforts. Incorporate the nuances that Hispanic Americans consider meaningful aspects of the holiday, such as large family gatherings with food and music.

Key Insight #2:

Black and Asian parents (both Moms and Dads) feel especially strongly about celebrating ALL the women in their life for Mother’s Day.

A Deeper Look:

Our research on Cultural Traits has showed us that these two segments are highly community-oriented, which likely explains their stronger association with Mother’s Day as a holiday honoring all women. Parents of these segments are particularly attuned to the role that other women in their communities play in raising their children, such as sisters, aunts, cousins, Godmothers, and friends.

For the Black segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the community’s history of adversity and the necessity to create a strong network of support for one another. It’s possible that as many Black Americans become parents themselves, they reflect even more strongly on the role that many women in their community had played in helping to raise them. 

For the Asian segment, celebrating all women may be driven by the segment’s cultural emphasis on respect and humility. Many Asian countries are more collectivist, meaning that social norms prioritize the community over the individual. This may help explain why Asian Parents would be more likely to want to recognize the contributions of all women on Mother’s Day. 

Action Step:

Create cross-cultural appeal by expanding your brand’s Mother’s Day marketing efforts to be inclusive of all women that play an important maternal or supporting role in the family. Connection with others is a theme that consumers across backgrounds resonate with universally. Be sure to infuse authentic cultural cues and segment-specific nuances to connect deeply both within segments, as well as across segments.

Contact us via the form below to learn more about how you can access deeper insights on our cultural intelligence platform.

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How Consumers Across Generations Celebrate Mother's Day

Learn how American consumers prepare for and celebrate Mother's Day.

Mother’s Day presents ample opportunity for brands to connect authentically with consumers across generations. Collage Group’s Holidays & Occasions research provides insights on a wide scope of important events that occur throughout the year. In addition to Mother’s Day, members get access to research on holidays such as Thanksgiving, Hispanic Heritage Month, Halloween, Christmas, plus several more. Fill out the form below to view a sample from this year’s Mother’s Day study on Gen Z, Millennials, Gen X and Boomers. 

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This past Mother’s Day, Pandora launched a thoughtful campaign aimed towards younger generations that features Netflix sensation and Stranger Things actor, Millie Bobbie Brown. 

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Consumer Holidays Trends: Thanksgiving 2021

How will Americans prepare for and celebrate Thanksgiving this year?

In a not-so-post-pandemic era, it’s essential for brands to keep an eye on the behaviors and attitudes surrounding special occasions. Insights from Collage Group’s Holidays & Occasions research enables you to communicate with your audience authentically and effectively. Fill out the form below to download a sample of the study. 

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The mass majority of Americans celebrate Thanksgiving. In our most recent round of surveys fielded in May 2021, respondents gave us fascinating insights around the following topics: 

• What traditional and non-traditional foods get included in Thanksgiving celebrations

• How certain segments react to stress during the holidays 

• Which segment is most likely to have a “friendsgiving”

Collage Group helps marketers and insights leaders connect around this occasion by providing insights that clarify the similarities and differences in how American consumers across diverse segments prepare for and experience Thanksgiving. These insights allow for more efficient and effective activations that capture greater mind and market share.

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How Consumers Across Generations Celebrate Halloween

Learn how consumers across generational segments interact with and celebrate Halloween.

Our latest Holidays & Occasions research covers major attitudes and behaviors of Gen Z, Millennials, Gen X and Boomers around Halloween. Read on for a few insights from this year’s study. The full report is available to members of Collage Group’s Generations program. 

1. Halloween is most highly celebrated by Gen Z and becomes less popular with age.

71% of Americans celebrate Halloween.

2. Most Americans likely have self-expression in mind when preparing for and celebrating halloween.

The Millennial and Gen X Segments Are Most Likely to Hold this View.

3. Younger Halloween celebrants are more likely to associate the holiday with a party atmosphere.

4. Millennial Americans are most likely to carve pumpkins as part of their Halloween celebration.

Almost Half of Gen Z and Millennials Go to Haunted Houses during the Halloween Season.

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How Consumers Engage with Cookouts and Barbecues

Learn how Americans across racial and ethnic segments prepare for and experience cookouts and barbecues.

Brands are constantly tapping into the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors surrounding consumer holidays and occasions. This summer, most consumers across segments are looking forward to barbecues and cookouts. In Welcome to the Traegerhood, Traeger Grill reminds us that cookouts and barbecues have the power to create a sense of community–a concept much longed for in the midst of the pandemic. Brands can look to this commercial as an example of relevant, effective storytelling.

The following consumer insights belong to a series of Collage Group reports on holidays and occasions. This targeted research allows for more efficient and effective brand activations that capture greater mind and market share.

1. Multicultural Americans Are More Likely to Have a Family Sauce or Special Recipe for Barbecues and Cookouts

39% of Americans say their family has  a special sauce or recipe for cookouts or barbecues.

Acculturated Hispanics are least likely (36%H) to say their family has a special sauce or recipe for cookouts or barbecues,
compared to Unacculturated (54%) and Bicultural (60%) Hispanics.

2. Millennials Take the Most Active Role in Food Preparation at Barbecues.

The Differences among Generations Are Likely Tied to Life Stage.

3. Food Is the Star of the Show—and Most Important Element—of Most Americans’ Cookouts.

Music Is More Likely to Be a Crucial Component of Cookouts for LGBTQ+ Americans.

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Consumer Attitudes Towards the Olympics

Collage Group helps marketers and insights leaders connect around this occasion by providing insights that clarify the similarities and differences in how American consumers across diverse segments prepare for and experience the Olympics.

The world’s most unifying sporting event is right around the corner. The Olympics, taking place in Tokyo this year, are one occasion brands need to understand to fully capture diverse America’s attention.

One of this year’s most moving campaigns comes from consumer giant Proctor & Gamble, whose #LeadWithLove campaign hits every cultural mark. Their latest commercial, Love Leads to Good, brings awareness around the Olympic games through inclusive casting and thoughtful storytelling. 

The following consumer insights belong to a series of Collage Group reports on holidays and occasions. This targeted research allows for more efficient and effective brand activations that capture greater mind and market share.

1. Hispanic Americans Are More Likely to Believe the Olympics Brings Unity across Different Countries.

According to our most recent study, 76% of Americans believe the Olympics are a great way to bring unity across different countries.

2. Most Americans Take Advantage of the Olympics to Watch Sports outside Their Typical Viewing Habits.

However, Gen Z is notably less likely to expand their viewership to new sports.

3. Three in Four Multicultural Americans Agree that the Olympics Are a Great Way to Celebrate Diversity.

The Olympics are a great way to celebrate diversity.

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Fundamentals of Generational Marketing: Passion Points
Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in.
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They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. They are concrete expressions of culture. This research offers brands and marketers important insights to win over consumers from all generational cohorts.

Learn more in this download from our Engage Gen Z and Millennial Passion Points presentation.

Engage Gen Z and Millennial Passion Points

What matters most to Boomers, Gen X, Millennials and Gen Z?

Our topline results show that consumers generally opt for TV and Movies, Music, and Food. Boomers and Gen Z consumers tend to have more fluctuations in their passions with higher peaks and lower valleys than Gen X and Millennials. Boomers are more likely to say they are interested in religion, while Gen Z over-indexes in music and games. Gen Xers often find themselves between Millennials and Boomers, such as their passion for traveling. 

Millennials, known for their love of new experiences, are significantly more interested in staying active than the older two generations.

Beyond these top-line results, we have much insight as to which generational cohorts over or under-index on various topics such as movies & tv shows, music, food and travel.

Here are four important data points from the study:

1. Movies & TV Shows

On the left, you see the favorite movie genres for the total population. Comedy and Action/Adventure are the overall winners. On the right, though, we see the responses of each generational cohort.

Gen Z and Millennials are more likely to prefer genres like horror (Gen Z), fantasy, and animation, including anime. Gen X and Boomers, however, are more likely to choose a drama, thriller, or science fiction option.

2. Music & Audio

Looking through the chart, you’ll see that the generations have distinct tastes in music genres – at least between older and younger generations. For the total population, Rock is most popular, with 42 percent of consumers saying it is in their top three music genres. But both younger generations under-index on rock music. Especially Gen Z, where only 25 percent say they choose rock. Gen Z and Millennials over-index on liking Hip-Hop and R&B and are more open to K-pop as well.

This is aligned with what we know about younger generations generally – they’re more racially and ethnically diverse, and this is reflected in their diverse music tastes as well.

3. Food

When it comes to food, one big question is whether American consumers consider themselves “foodies,” who prioritize taste and experiential eating, or “health nuts,” who prioritize nutrition and diets. 

Here, we see that more Americans consider themselves “Foodies” than “Health Nuts.”

We also see some interesting generational variation here.

On the left, we see that about half of Americans consider themselves “Foodies,” and that Millennials – at 61 percent – is more likely than all other generations to believe this.  And on the right, we see that less than a third of the total population considers themselves “health nuts.” Gen Z and Gen X consumers hold to that average, but the big differences lie between Millennials and Boomers. 

So far, we’ve seen a lot of trends hold to a younger vs older dichotomy, but when it comes to food-related identity, Millennials really stand out as being food-focused. Boomers are not as focused on considering themselves a foodie or a health nut. While most Americans call themselves “foodies,” Millennial Americans lead the “health nut” trend.

4. Travel

For many people, the main tossup is between domestic versus international travel.

On average at the total population level, consumers are pretty split between the two, but preference for domestic taking a slight lead.

However when we break the data down by generation, we see a pretty clear pattern amongst consumers. 

Younger people have a distinctly stronger desire to travel abroad – especially Gen Z, at 61%, they are significantly more likely than all other generations. Millennials are an even split. Older generations are where we see a stronger preference for domestic travel. Boomers are the most likely generation to prefer traveling within the US over traveling abroad – about three in four. Perhaps driven by a desire to stay closer to home.

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Fundamentals of Multicultural Marketing: Passion Points

What matters most to American consumers across racial and ethnic segments? Collage Group's latest study covers major Multicultural Passion Points your brand can act on immediately.

What are Passion Points?

Passion Points are the activities and areas of life people are deeply interested in. They are the “things” that people prioritize when spending their time, money, and attention. They are concrete expressions of culture.

Collage’s Passion Point research offers deep insight into 8 Passion Points we know Americans care deeply about. This work offers brands and marketers important tools to win multicultural consumer segments.

To get you started, let’s look at some topline findings about the things that matter most across both segments and the Passion Points themselves.

1. Multicultural Consumers Want More Experiential Movie-watching

When we asked people if they like watching movies in theaters more than at home, and if they prefer “enhanced” movie experiences, like IMAX or 3D, less than half of the total population agreed. But it’s the Non-Hispanic White segment which is driving this low agreement. Multicultural segments were more likely to say they prefer watching movies in theaters, and that they prefer IMAX and 3D movie experiences.

When we double click into acculturation, we see that bicultural and unacculturated Hispanics are the ones really driving the Hispanic desire for theaters and enhanced movie experiences.  Acculturated Hispanic consumers are less likely to enjoy watching movies in theaters (42%H ; Bi: 54% ; Un: 63%H), or having an “enhanced” movie experience (41%H ; Bi: 56% ; Un: 56%).

2. Multicultural Consumers Have Distinct Tastes for Music Genres

Which genres are most popular across multicultural segments?

For the total population, Rock is most popular, with 42 percent of consumers saying it is in their top three music genres. But all three multicultural segments under-index on rock music. Especially the Black segment, where only 11 percent say they choose rock! What do these consumers listen to instead? 

For Black Americans, the answer is R&B – seven in ten Black consumers choose R&B over other genres. Black consumers are also most likely to listen to Hip-Hop, Jazz, Blues, Soul, and Gospel music.

For Asian Americans, the answer is Pop music – half of Asian consumers say they choose Pop over other genres. Asian consumers are also most likely to choose electronic and K-Pop music.

And for Hispanic Americans, the most popular music genre is Latin Pop, including Reggaeton. About a third of Hispanic consumers say they choose this genre over other options.

3. More Americans Consider Themselves “Foodies” Rather than “Health Nuts”

About half of Americans consider themselves “Foodies,” and the Black segment – at 56 percent – is more likely than non-Hispanic White consumers believe this.

We also see that while less than a third of the total population considers themselves “health nuts,” all multicultural segments are more likely than non-Hispanic White consumers to do so.

While only a quarter of White consumers are “health nuts,” over a third of Asian, Black, and Hispanic consumers are. With Unacculturated Hispanic consumers being the most likely, at 48 percent, compared to the other Hispanic Acculturation segments.

And while most Americans call themselves “foodies,” Multicultural Americans lead the “health nut” trend. 

4. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans Prefer to Travel Internationally

When we asked consumers to choose between traveling domestically or internationally, most of the Hispanic and Asian segments chose international travel. As you can see on the chart, only 48 percent – about half – of Hispanic consumers chose domestic travel, and even fewer – 38 percent – of Asian respondents opted for the U.S. option. Within the Hispanic segment, bicultural and unacculturated Hispanic Americans are more likely than their acculturated peers to prefer international travel.

The Black and Non-Hispanic White consumer segments, on the other hand, prefer domestic over international travel.

1. Multicultural Consumers Want More Experiential Movie-watching

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

% agree

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > .95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

2. Multicultural Consumers Have Distinct Tastes for Music Genres

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

Multiselect, Max. 3

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > .95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

3. More Americans Consider Themselves “Foodies” Rather than “Health Nuts”

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

% agree

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

4. Bicultural and Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian Americans Prefer to Travel Internationally

Collage Group Passion Points Survey, January 2021 (18-75 population)

Forced choice

* Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other racial/ethnic segments

W Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from Non-Hispanic White respondents

H Indicates statistically significant difference (p > 0.95) from all other Hispanic Acculturation segments

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While Love of Family Is Universal, Representation Must Be Nuanced

Family is a commonly shared value across diverse segments, but that doesn’t mean it’s one-size-fits-all. Read on to understand the nuances within multicultural family life for authentic representation and effective connection on the path towards Cultural Fluency.

Fill out the form to download a sample of the study.

Human beings are social by nature – this is universally true. No matter our background, we all crave connection. We value family and anchor our lives to our loved ones.

Our research confirms that family matters to pretty much everyone, but our data also reveals: how is family experienced and expressed differently across cultural backgrounds?

These subtleties aren’t just food for thought – getting them right matters. Multicultural Americans, especially Black and Unacculturated Hispanic consumers, say it matters a lot to them that advertisements represent families that look like theirs. And a fifth of Americans, especially Black consumers, want to see more non-traditional family structures represented.

How should brands activate on the shared value of family connection?

Brands must understand nuances in multicultural family dynamics to accurately represent and connect with these powerful segments. In doing so, you’re not only pleasing consumers – you’re taking a strategic approach to be Culturally Fluent.

Authentic representation of one segment doesn’t come at the cost of resonance with other segments. In fact, genuine cultural signals are what resonates. Even if the cues aren’t personally relatable, the recognition of authenticity is priceless. An accurate portrayal of one segment is a way to position your brand as trustworthy and respected by all consumers.

Collage Group’s 2020 research initiatives dive deep into family values, attitudes, and behaviors to distinguish variations across segments and uncover authentic details. Keep reading for high-level segment takeaways and download the deck for more, including family profiles by segment.

1. Which consumers value the role of song, music and dance in the family?

About a third of Hispanic and Black Americans value the role of song, music, and dance in the family. These activities are ways to bond with one another and are also likely to be present at family gatherings.

For instance, Oreo acknowledges the lively nature of Hispanic American families with a relevant portrayal of the importance of song and dance in family life. Their recent spot features Latin pop singer Becky G video-chatting her brother. They connect over a shared love of music – and Oreos – as they sing and dance over the phone with her extended family in the background.

Our CultureRate:Ad research shows that this ad successfully represents the Hispanic experience of the universal Group Trait of Family, while simultaneously resonating across segments (including White viewers). The music-and-dance-filled ad did exceptionally well with the Hispanic segment, with an A-CFQ score of 81 (+6 points above the resonance threshold of 75), as well as the Black segment (A-CFQ score of 74). But the power of authentically representing the Hispanic family was appreciated by other segments, too, with A-CFQ scores of 73 for the Asian segment and 72 for the White segment. Even though the ad was in Spanish, consumers recognize and appreciate the cultural cues of singing and dancing as relevant to Hispanic families.

2. How do Unacculturated Hispanic and Asian American consumers value family?

Both segments like to make their families proud and live in accordance with familial expectations. They also tend to be especially loyal to their families and prize their input when making decisions.

This spot by Chase leans into Asian Americans’ desire to please their elders. A son is learning to make noodles from scratch, and along the way seeks guidance from his mother and approval from his grandmother.

3. How often do multicultural consumers spend time with family?

Multicultural Americans tend to have more relatives and be closer to distant relatives than White Americans. Moreover, Hispanic and Black segments spend more time with their relatives and are more likely to build close relationships with them than White Americans are.

Connect across segments through this common value and illustrate how your brand can strengthen family ties. For instance, a recent Christmas spot by Etsy shows a Black family gathered for the holiday. The son’s new boyfriend joins the celebration, but feels intimidated by all the relatives, until they warmly “welcome him to the family” with a personalized gift.

For more insights on the study, download an excerpt of the sample above. Learn more about membership, custom research and more by filling out the form below. 

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