Case Study By Industry | Wine & Spirits

Case Study By Industry | Wine & Spirits
Global Corporate Revenue: $5 Billion

Insight in Action: Establishing Brand Positioning by Engaging Black Cultural Traits

Learn how the world’s leading brands are applying Collage Group’s consumer insights to drive cultural resonance in advertising.

Challenge

The CMO of a major alcoholic beverage company tasked a team with surfacing the mega-trends shaping the multicultural audience. The CMO wanted the team to refine or rethink brand positioning for the entire portfolio of wine and spirits brands based on these insights.

Solution

Using Collage Group’s proprietary data into the cultural traits of Black consumers, the task force recognized that category-specific insights about the attitudes and behaviors of Black wine consumers did not conflict with those of its Black spirits consumers as long as those insights were grounded in an understanding of Black cultural traits overall.

TYING KEY OBJECTIVES TO INSIGHTS

Collage Group provided category-level detail to deepen appreciation for Black consumers across the entire portfolio of alcohol brands.

OBJECTIVE

Understand Black consumer attitudes to wine drinking and resolve why these differ from attitudes to spirits drinking.

COLLAGE RESOURCES, DATA & TOOLS

Category Essentials-Alcoholic Beverages revealed a range of distinct insights into Black consumer attitudes to wine drinking and, in particular, toward developing Connoisseurship and Expertise.

CONNECTING THE DOTS

To connect the dots, Collage’s deep dive into cultural insights allowed brand leaders to interpret the category-level detail into a broader strategy and application of the insights.

OBJECTIVE

  1. Immerse in the Black cultural experience.

COLLAGE RESOURCES, DATA & TOOLS

1. Webinars and presentations on Black Cultural Traits provided deep insight into the Realness, Self-Expression, Perseverance and Ambition traits that were used to inform how category-specific insights from spirits and wine could be unified.

2. Understand how Black consumers project influence.

2. Webinars and presentations on Cultural Influence outlined how the Cue-taking, Expertise and Trendsetting traits manifest differently across segments.

RESULT

With a deep understanding of Black Cultural Traits, the team was able to establish a foundation for understanding Black consumer wine attitudes and preferences.

PUTTING INSIGHTS IN ACTION

Armed with Collage Group insights, the multicultural task force team members found a way to unify seemingly disparate category consumption insights about Black consumers that had emerged separately from the wine and spirits divisions. The team was able to combine a deeper understanding of the Black cultural trait of Realness with the Black consumer orientation toward Expertise and Trendsetting to establish a foundation for understanding Black consumer wine attitudes and preferences. Furthermore, the team was able to see that these behaviors activated on different facets of the same underlying set of insights into Black consumers that informed Black spirit consumption.

As a result, the entire wine portfolio is now being positioned to activate Black consumers through connoisseurship, as distinct from how the spirits division activates Black consumers through a different set of group traits. 

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Essentials of Gen X Consumers

Essentials of Gen X Consumers

Collage Group’s Essentials of Gen X consumers presentation explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research: demographics and economic opportunity, identity related marketing expectations, and Cultural Traits.

Read below for several key insights and then download the presentation and recorded webinar to go deeper into our Gen X Cultural Traits.

Collage Group’s Essentials of Gen X consumers presentation explores three areas of our consumer fundamentals research: demographics and economic opportunity, identity related marketing expectations, and Cultural Traits. Read below for several key insights and then download the presentation and recorded webinar to go deeper into our Gen X Cultural Traits.

1. Gen X (aged between 42-56 years old in 2021) are less diverse than Millennials and Gen Z, but they’re significantly more diverse than the Baby Boomer cohort.

40% of the generation are people of color, much more than the 29% of Boomers. In fact, the rate of change in diversity between Baby Boomers and Gen X is much higher than from Gen X to Millennials or Millennials to Gen Z, showing how Gen X has led the way into the era of intrinsic generational diversity that exists today.

2. Despite being the smallest generation by population size, in 2019 Gen X was both the highest-earning and highest-spending generation of them all.

Due to their current life stage, Xers have reached the peak of their income potential in high-powered career positions and incur high costs for things like taking care of family and paying steep tuition prices for their college-bound kids. The Millennial and Gen X Segments Are Most Likely to Hold this View.

3. Gen Xers are most likely to go out of their way to support brands that are inclusive of people with physical disabilities, perhaps because they came of age during the fight for disability rights and the passing of the Americans with Disabilities Act in 1990.

 Uniquely, Gen X was the only generation that included looking for brands that support Christians in their top five priorities, although this statistic was driven by white Gen Xers and is less prominent for multicultural Gen Xers.

4. As a smaller generation positioned between two larger cohorts, Gen X often finds themselves bridging gaps in society.

Growing up, they bridged the divide between analog and digital, and transitioned into the post-Cold War world. Gen X often feels caught in the middle and has been called the “sandwich” generation.

5. Brands can better connect with Gen X by leveraging the cohort’s Cultural Traits. Four important traits are: Self-Reliance, Enterprising, Optimism, and Traditional.

These traits can be used to create more authentic advertising, identify efficiencies to connect across cohorts through shared traits, and identify how to best position your brand.

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How Consumers Across Generations Celebrate Halloween

How Consumers Across Generations Celebrate Halloween

Learn how consumers across generational segments interact with and celebrate Halloween.

Our latest Holidays & Occasions research covers major attitudes and behaviors of Gen Z, Millennials, Gen X and Boomers around Halloween. Read on for a few insights from this year’s study. The full report is available to members of Collage Group’s Generations program. 

1. Halloween is most highly celebrated by Gen Z and becomes less popular with age.

71% of Americans celebrate Halloween.

2. Most Americans likely have self-expression in mind when preparing for and celebrating halloween.

The Millennial and Gen X Segments Are Most Likely to Hold this View.

3. Younger Halloween celebrants are more likely to associate the holiday with a party atmosphere.

4. Millennial Americans are most likely to carve pumpkins as part of their Halloween celebration.

Almost Half of Gen Z and Millennials Go to Haunted Houses during the Halloween Season.

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Become Culturally Fluent & Future-Proof Your Brand for Growth | IDEA Forum Panel

Become Culturally Fluent & Future-Proof Your Brand for Growth | IDEA Forum Panel

At the 2021 IDEA Forum, hosted by the Insights Association, we were honored to host two special sessions centered on helping brands continue their journey to cultural fluency.

Explore an excerpt of the Multicultural Terminology report. This is a selection of a much larger, deep dive available to members of the Multicultural consumer research platform.

Attendees heard directly from Collage Group members during “Become Culturally Fluent and Future-Proof Your Brand for Growth.” In a panel hosted by Collage Group CEO and Co-Founder David Wellisch, brand leaders shared how they are seizing this moment to embrace cultural fluency as the foundation of their work.

A special thank you to our esteemed panelists:

Lisa Frison, Enterprise Strategic Diverse Initiatives Leader at Wells Fargo & Company. In her role, Lisa leads cross-functional teams responsible for strategies and initiatives that identify, attract, and retain new and existing relationships for diverse customers.

Daniel Ramos, Director of Nickelodeon Digital Consumer Insights at ViacomCBS. In his role, Daniel tracks digital trends among families, provides user-centered research support, and conducts landscape studies on education, gaming, apps, podcasts, smart speakers and more. His most important and impactful work to date is a 2-year-long study on kids and race/ethnicity titled “Shades of Us.”

Aaron Steele, Senior Director of Analytics & Insights at Procter & Gamble. As part of his role, Aaron co-leads some of the total company equality and inclusion efforts. He has spent 15 years at P&G, dedicating his work to nine iconic brands, including Tide, Bounty, Head & Shoulders, Pantene, Herbal Essences, Febreze, Dawn and Cascade.

Watch the replay to hear panelist answers to key questions, including:

• Do corporations have a responsibility to support consumers across race and ethnicity, generation, sexual orientation, and gender? Can brands afford to remain on the sidelines?

• What steps you are taking to authentically engage and support America’s diverse consumers, amplify their voices, and drive change?

• What is the current relationship between Diversity and Inclusion and Diverse Segment Marketing – and do you think that will change in the future?

• What do you think diverse consumer segments – and the majority of Americans – are looking for from brands?

• How do we maintain this momentum for change?

Collage Group leaders dove deeper in a second session, “Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology,” where attendees learned how to engage culture with a deep understanding of the words that define it.

Presenters, Zekeera Belton, Vice President of Client Services and Diverse Segment Strategist and Bryan Miller, PhD, Senior Director of Product and Content, shared insights into consumer reaction to terms like Latinx and BIPOC, the nuances of Hispanic vs. Latino and Black vs. African American. They also explored the labels and/or identifiers each consumer segment prefers and double-click by age, gender and more. Attendees walked away with enhanced vocabulary and insights for cultural resonance beyond specific groups to cultural fluency across many diverse consumer audiences.

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Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology

Understanding & Embracing Multicultural Terminology

Cultural Fluency, or the ability to use culture to connect effectively and authentically within and across consumer segments, is an emerging priority for brands. Understanding and embracing multicultural terminology is a key component of the cultural fluency journey.

Applying Multicultural Terminology

Brands Are Challenged by Rising Cultural Diversity and Polarization.

Research and insights leaders face enormous pressure to translate the rapid cultural transformation underway in the U.S. marketplace into clear action steps for their brands.

In 2020, cultural change rapidly accelerated, given the sudden shifts in consumer values and behaviors driven by COVID-19 and the heightened recognition of the social justice movement. CMOs began 2021 with the demand that their insights and marketing teams adopt new and more inclusive approaches to engaging America’s diverse population. “Cultural Fluency” has emerged as a new mandate: the ability to use culture to connect effectively and authentically within and across segments.

Getting language and labels right is a key component of authentically engaging across America’s diverse consumer segments. Our research-centered insights unveil consumer reaction to terms like Latinx and BIPOC, the nuances of Hispanic vs. Latino and Black vs. African American, and the most preferred terminology for Asian Americans.

Learn What Factors Influence Multicultural Terminology Preferences

The challenges insights professionals face with respect to multicultural terminology are growing as American consumers, fueled by recent social events, embrace their racial, ethnic, and intersectional identities.

This presentation explores how personal characteristics such as race, ethnicity, country of origin, generation, and gender influence self-identification and preferences for specific labels. Insights and marketing professionals can use these findings to craft outreach and messaging that respects consumer preferences and signals empathy and understanding.

Additionally, many insights professionals fail to recognize and account for the diversity within the Hispanic population that is especially important when it comes to terminology and preferred labels. This presentation also provides an overview of Collage Group’s proprietary Hispanic Acculturation model and a breakdown of preferred identifiers by acculturation level. These findings can be leveraged to improve engagement among specific Hispanic segments, including those that are Spanish-dominant.

Further, researchers unfamiliar with multicultural America often struggle to identify the correct terminology to use in surveys and may accidentally bias their results in ways they fail to appreciate. This research helps insights professionals understand the nuances of multicultural terminology, including the positive or negative sentiment in-culture consumers associate with specific terms. These findings can be used by insights professionals to craft more effective surveys.

Top Lessons for More Inclusive Research

Leveraging data from over 6,000 respondents across three surveys fielded in 2020, this presentation explores how multicultural Americans approach the many options available to them for personal self-identification. While the language surrounding multicultural identity has evolved over the past years in public discourse, multicultural Americans themselves are mostly neutral or negative about the proliferation of many new options others use on their behalf. When engaging multicultural research participants, insights professionals should be mindful to present options aligning with how these individuals prefer to think of themselves.

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Case Study By Industry | Processed & Packaged Goods

Case Study By Industry | Processed & Packaged Goods

Fostering Empathy for Diverse Consumers Across Brand Teams

CHALLENGE

To realize its mission of bringing “Flavor to All”, an international Processed & Packaged Goods Company recognized the need for a strong foundational understanding of diverse consumers as an imperative for building authentic connection across the total market.

The company had a strong starting point: a diverse workforce, inclusive mission, and credible consumer insights partners (including Collage Group) that provide data across culture.

However, the Consumer Insights team recognized that driving authentic connection would take more than unearthing culturally fluent data. They had to go the extra mile, teach the insights, and foster empathy for diverse consumers throughout their brand teams. 

Learn more about Collage Group’s consumer insights in our Category Essentials for Food and fill out the form to download a sample of the research.

SOLUTION

To imbed these deep consumer insights across the company culture, Collage Group designed a partnership solution for the company through our suite of product offerings, which included:

  1. Access to the Multicultural Consumer Research Platform, where they could leverage timely research and content on topics of interest across the company, including diverse consumer digital/social behaviors, attitudes toward holidays and occasions, and more.

  2. Support from Collage Group’s Syndicated Research and SME’s to build a “Multicultural Webinar Series,” with the goal of sharing culturally relevant insights across the organization. The focus was to educate on key consumer segments (Hispanic, Black, Asian, LGBTQ+, etc.). For easy takeaways, each presentation begins and ends with “Five Facts” relevant to the demographic or topic. 
  3.  

RESULT

Collage Group operationalized a virtual, companywide webinar learning series (mid-pandemic), which included eight presentations, reaching hundreds of attendees across the company.

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Connect with Americans across Gender and Sexuality around the Holidays

Connect with Americans across Gender and Sexuality around the Holidays

LGBTQ+ Americans are especially excited about life getting back to normal so they can participate in public events and celebrate Pride. 

Our latest LGBTQ+ & Gender Holidays & Occasions webinar is an introduction and overview of our research stream that looks at the holidays and occasions that matter most to Americans across sexuality and gender. Read below for a few highlights from the presentation.

1. LGBTQ+ People Hold Significantly More Progressive Views on Marriage Proposals

Two-thirds of All Americans Believe that Women Can Propose Marriage to Men.

2. One in Two Men Enjoy Being the “Grill Master” at Barbecues.

Women are far less likely to enjoy being in charge of grilling duties.

3. Costumes and Costume Parties Play a Much Larger Role in the LGBTQ+ Community’s Halloween Celebrations.

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How Consumers Engage with Cookouts and Barbecues

How Consumers Engage with Cookouts and Barbecues

Learn how Americans across racial and ethnic segments prepare for and experience cookouts and barbecues.

Brands are constantly tapping into the attitudes, beliefs and behaviors surrounding consumer holidays and occasions. This summer, most consumers across segments are looking forward to barbecues and cookouts. In Welcome to the Traegerhood, Traeger Grill reminds us that cookouts and barbecues have the power to create a sense of community–a concept much longed for in the midst of the pandemic. Brands can look to this commercial as an example of relevant, effective storytelling.

The following consumer insights belong to a series of Collage Group reports on holidays and occasions. This targeted research allows for more efficient and effective brand activations that capture greater mind and market share.

1. Multicultural Americans Are More Likely to Have a Family Sauce or Special Recipe for Barbecues and Cookouts

39% of Americans say their family has  a special sauce or recipe for cookouts or barbecues.

Acculturated Hispanics are least likely (36%H) to say their family has a special sauce or recipe for cookouts or barbecues,
compared to Unacculturated (54%) and Bicultural (60%) Hispanics.

2. Millennials Take the Most Active Role in Food Preparation at Barbecues.

The Differences among Generations Are Likely Tied to Life Stage.

3. Food Is the Star of the Show—and Most Important Element—of Most Americans’ Cookouts.

Music Is More Likely to Be a Crucial Component of Cookouts for LGBTQ+ Americans.

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